St.Louis plug in readiness task force

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  • Introduce Paul Snider, Manager, Government Affairs, Kansas City Power & Light Scott Carson, National Sales Director, Smith Electric Vehicles US
  • Transportation Electrification means purposefully moving from a transportation system fueled by petroleum toward transportation fueled by electricity. Many thought-leaders have concluded electric is the transportation solution of the future, given the expanding world market for petroleum-based fuel and the contraction of easy sources for oil. As such, our federal leadership is calling for significant investment in electric vehicle technology research and deployment and has given us some tools to get there.
  • We have been given some high targets to meet over the next few years, and what tools do we have to get there? Electric ground support and offroad vehicles have become nearly commonplace already Low-speed, or neighborhood, electric vehicles have been widely available for several years, though by no means a major market. All-electric, full-speed, commercial vehicles have been rolling out since late 2009, led by Smith Electric Vehicles here in the U.S. and have been a niche market in Europe for 80 years. Full-speed consumer electric vehicles are launching worldwide late this year and throughout 2011 and are arriving at the same time as plug-in electric hybrids.
  • Lofty goals, but what are the practical benefits of electric transportation? Local contractor electricians, to install and maintain the electric vehicle supply equipment (called EVSEs) would be the largest employment opportunity in most areas.   Depending on the volume sold, dealers may be able to add sales and mechanic jobs to support the additional sales.  Truck upfitters will support fleet EV purchases. Battery plants will provide assembly, skilled trades, and engineering jobs (a project in Tennessee will employ up to 1300 people). The EVSE industry itself provides manufacturing and sales jobs.
  • These are the air pollutants regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency. Picking on ozone, our major polluter: It is a chemical compound, created by particular conditions outdoors The “Ozone layer” above the earth is natural and protects us from UV rays But “Ground-level ozone” is a human-made pollutant, created when Nitrogen Oxide and Volatile Organic Compound emissions come together in heat and sunlight.
  • Ozone affects our health Causing damage to respiratory system Everyone can be affected, especially people with asthma, children, elderly, and people who exercise outdoors Ozone affects the Environment Damages leaves Reduces crop yields Makes plants less resistant to pests and disease As we can see here, mobile sources, our on-road and off-road vehicles, combine to make up 56% of ozone air pollution.
  • The Center for Neighborhood Technology recently released its Housing & Transportation Affordability Index. This slide compares annual household gasoline expenses in our region between the year 2000 and the peak of gas prices in mid-2008. The neighborhoods near the center of the action were spending less than $900 a year in 2000 on gas, but at its peak price in 2008, even those people would spend triple the money per year, up to $2700. Bright yellow = Less than 900 $/Year Light tan = 900 to 1,800 $/Year Tan = 1,800 to 2,700 $/Year Pink = 2,700 to 3,600 $/Year Red = 3,600 $/Year and Greater
  • As you know, the general trend over the years is higher gas prices. Just like housing costs ideally shouldn’t be more than 30% of total household income, ideally transportation costs shouldn’t rise above approximately 15% of total household income. Looking at the percentage of income spent in our region, even in the urban core in Kansas City, models show that transportation costs are at 16 and 17%, with much higher costs as we get to the outer rings of the metro.
  • Fleets have economies of scale and are necessarily the early adopters of vehicle technologies, which ultimately reduces costs for consumers. Fleet driving patterns are known, so matching the right vehicle and electric range to a known application creates built-in success and the perfect climate for demonstrations and pilot projects. Fleets are ubiquitous in urban areas, and as early adopters, their visibility promotes new technologies to the community Usually fleets get to try out new technologies because of these reasons, and sometimes or perhaps often it is a burden they carry for the general population, but theirs is an important and significant role
  • There are all sorts of acronyms for plug-in vehicles: EV, BEV, PHEV, ER-EV, but essentially there are two kinds: those that are powered solely by batteries and those that rely on the support of a more traditional fuel, usually gasoline or diesel. Either way, their electric batteries are primarily charged by electric outlets connected to the grid.
  • Now for the fun stuff. What’s coming down the assembly line now and in the near future? Ford plans to deliver the Transit Connect Electric small commercial van in 2010, its Focus Electric passenger car in 2011, and two next-generation hybrids and plug-in hybrid in 2012
  • Consumers are now able to reserve a first-run LEAF by visiting nissanusa.com/leaf-electric-car and putting in a $99 deposit. The LEAF is being launched in limited markets this winter, with wider distribution in 2011. Kansas City area dealers are scheduled to become Qualified for electric vehicle sales and service in June or July of 2011.
  • Columbia, Vantage, Miles, GEM, and other manufacturers have been producing low-speed all-electric work trucks for years. These vehicles have a maximum speed of 25 miles per hour, are legal on many streets with maximum posted speed limit of 35 miles per hour, and are ideal for many work and neighborhood situations.
  • Full-speed electric work trucks are now a reality, ranging from box trucks to full-size utility bucket trucks. Based on a platform and business model being used in Europe for more than 80 years, Smith EV US started assembling trucks in Kansas City last fall, and business is quickly growing here and around the U.S.
  • The Chevy Volt will launch in November in select markets. It’s introduction in the rest of the States will be staggered, according to the effort each community puts into a plug-in readiness effort, and they don’t yet have specific plans for a dealer training schedule in Kansas City. Chevy expects to be in the whole US market by the end of 2012.
  • Existing hybrid Priuses can be converted to plug-in hybrids with a certified conversion from A123 Hymotion, but the factory Plug-In Hybrid Prius isn’t due until 2011, with Toyota’s first all-electric vehicle tentatively scheduled for 2012.
  • Partnerships are being formed by area companies to supply solar charging canopies to those interested in further reducing their footprints by using solar energy to supplement their use of the electric grid.
  • Going back to passenger vehicles, let’s take a look at the charge times associated with a full or partial charge. Using a regular 120-volt outlet, it can take up to 20 hours to recharge a fully discharged battery, depending on how big your battery pack is. This is commonly called Level 1 charging. Using an outlet like your clothes dryer does, a 240-volt charge or level 2 charging, a fully discharged battery pack of the same size takes about a quarter of the time to recharge. More convenient, but it requires a much heavier load from the utility. This is where our friends on the Smart Grid project come in and one of the reasons why creating a plug-in strategy is necessary.
  • Over to Ron Achelpohl, Assistant Director of Transportation Planning at Mid-America Regional Council to talk about our Plug-In Readiness Initiative.
  • Environmental Improvement : Reduces emissions such as CO2, GHG, and particulates. Increases Transportation Energy Efficiency 50% efficiency gain over internal combustion vehicles. Cost savings result. Improves energy security Reduces demand for foreign oil and replacing it with domestic fuel sources. Provides great fuel source flexibility, including use of wind and solar. Increased economic activity, competitiveness, and jobs This new industry segment brings new green jobs in the plug-in space. New revenue streams result. Additional companies are attracted to our area.
  • Electrification projects and plug-in readiness activities are taking place throughout the country.
  • The sum total of these activities can be summed up with this map. Electrification is taking place more rapidly on the coasts. Kansas City can be the leader in the Mid West. But how do we get there?
  • Project Get Ready has identified barriers and prioritized the most important actions cities must take to become plug-in ready
  • Consumers will need to learn the pros and cons of a plug-in lifestyle, and a new way of valuing upfront costs against operational savings. All these players will need to build a new system of connectivity in order to line up charging times, billing, consumer preferences. Such changes create a multitude of barriers, not the least of which is “how can all these changes happen simultaneously and in a coordinated manner?”
  • Management as a multi-sector, city-wide project. Consumer hesitation at diving into a new paradigm for mobility Consumers will need to be educated about plug-ins Service techs will need to be trained High upfront costs for consumers will need to be reduced What if this exacerbates my peak load
  • Corporate/city/state fleets commit to buy a certain number of plug-ins Stakeholder group provides a place for interested consumers/fleets to register early Create collaborative stakeholder group to help interests align. Sign on to a clear regional plan Have one “champion” whose job it is to keep this group moving forward Work with banks and dealers to offer low-interest loans for plug-ins Bundle all key incentives at vehicle point of purchase (home charger vouchers, rebates, etc.) Perks: access to HOV lanes, free tolls/downtown parking, reserved airport parking. Create education plans including test drives, “quick lease” options, and high profile drivers. Reduced (or free) electricity rates for charging. Fast-track permitting for charging stations. Ensure new and reconstruction/renovation building codes support the operation of plug-ins. Tie provisions of free home and public charge spots, as well as free or cheaper electricity, to either utility override power or “no charge” times. Local employers/retailers provide some charge stations at parking decks. Install public charge spots in high-traffic zones and parking areas with public and private money Provide affordable and available—or free—Level 2 home-charger/driveway circuit installation.
  • Corporate/city/state fleets commit to buy a certain number of plug-ins Stakeholder group provides a place for interested consumers/fleets to register early Create collaborative stakeholder group to help interests align. Sign on to a clear regional plan Have one “champion” whose job it is to keep this group moving forward Work with banks and dealers to offer low-interest loans for plug-ins Bundle all key incentives at vehicle point of purchase (home charger vouchers, rebates, etc.) Perks: access to HOV lanes, free tolls/downtown parking, reserved airport parking. Create education plans including test drives, “quick lease” options, and high profile drivers. Reduced (or free) electricity rates for charging. Fast-track permitting for charging stations. Ensure new and reconstruction/renovation building codes support the operation of plug-ins. Tie provisions of free home and public charge spots, as well as free or cheaper electricity, to either utility override power or “no charge” times. Local employers/retailers provide some charge stations at parking decks. Install public charge spots in high-traffic zones and parking areas with public and private money Provide affordable and available—or free—Level 2 home-charger/driveway circuit installation.
  • Support non-traditional OEMs, conversion shops, and other businesses with tax incentives, contracts. Plug in owners get access to a “plug-in concierge”. Plug-in service is better than traditional service. Invest in education for plug-in service technicians and plug-in crash safety training for fire/police Provide cash incentives to consumers for vehicles so that plug-in-premium is eliminated Introduce a government/3rd party sponsored battery warranty program to share the risk and to reduce the near-term cost of advanced batteries Launch major marketing plan to highlight the “empowerment, fun and energy independence” associated with plug-ins Bundle plug-in purchase with a “green power only” utility contract and discounts on home solar, AMI installation, a smart grid upgrade, bike, bus pass, and/ or light rail pass to high-light plug-in role in the green lifestyle Foster early roll-out in taxi fleets and rental cars Develop materials to educate the drivers of tomorrow by reaching students of all levels Install sub-meters (or Smart Grid) for plug-ins
  • Support non-traditional OEMs, conversion shops, and other businesses with tax incentives, contracts. Plug in owners get access to a “plug-in concierge”. Plug-in service is better than traditional service. Invest in education for plug-in service technicians and plug-in crash safety training for fire/police Provide cash incentives to consumers for vehicles so that plug-in-premium is eliminated Introduce a government/3rd party sponsored battery warranty program to share the risk and to reduce the near-term cost of advanced batteries Launch major marketing plan to highlight the “empowerment, fun and energy independence” associated with plug-ins Bundle plug-in purchase with a “green power only” utility contract and discounts on home solar, AMI installation, a smart grid upgrade, bike, bus pass, and/ or light rail pass to high-light plug-in role in the green lifestyle Foster early roll-out in taxi fleets and rental cars Develop materials to educate the drivers of tomorrow by reaching students of all levels Install sub-meters (or Smart Grid) for plug-ins
  • Create a strategy for establishing a network of charging stations both public and private, including number, timing, ownership, locations and funding Coordinate with Government Policy Sub-team to ensure building codes, permitting processes, and zoning ordinances support the strategy. Coordinate with electric utility companies to manage impact to grid through timing level of charging and supplementation with distributed generation (PV, Wind). Plan the installation of charging infrastructure for public entities, businesses, and electric utilities for fleets and the general public Coordinate with the permitting authority to facilitate fast and easy installation of home charging station installations when a person purchases a plug-in vehicle. Include regulatory planning in cooperation with the government policy sub team and work with government policy sub-team to initiate regulatory framework discussions with PSC and KCC.
  • Coordinate with the permitting authority to facilitate fast and easy installation of home charging station installations when a person purchases a plug-in vehicle. Include regulatory planning in cooperation with the government policy sub team and work with government policy sub-team to initiate regulatory framework discussions with PSC and KCC.
  • (Passenger cars from major OEMs; heavy, medium, and light duty fleet work vehicles; personal vehicles – scooters, bicycles, NEVs, etc)

Transcript

  • 1. Task Force Kickoff May 4, 2010 St. Louis Regional Clean Cities Coalition St. Louis Regional Plug-in Readiness Initiative
  • 2.  
  • 3.
    • Moving from a transportation system fueled by petroleum toward transportation fueled by electricity.
    • Federal leadership is calling for significant investment in electric vehicle technology:
      • 1M plug-in vehicles on the road by 2015.
      • 50% tax credit for infrastructure.
      • $7500 tax credit for purchasing plug-in vehicles.
      • Grant opportunities.
  • 4.
    • Some industry estimates predict or hope:
      • 25% of light-duty vehicles sales will be electric by 2020.
      • 75% of light-duty vehicle miles will be electric by 2040.
  • 5.
    • Local contractor electricians
    •  
    • Sales and technicians at car and truck dealers
    •  
    • Truck upfitters will support electric chassis
    • Assembly, skilled trades, and engineering jobs
    • Electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) manufacturing and sales jobs.
  • 6.
    • What are the main pollutants?
    • Carbon monoxide
    • Lead
    • Nitrogen dioxide
    • Particulate Matter
    • Ozone
    • Sulfur dioxide
    • Air Toxics
  • 7. Practical Benefits of EVs: Air Quality Mobile sources combine for 56% of ozone air pollution
  • 8. Practical Benefits of EVs: Fuel Affordability Data copyright ©2010 by CNT (Center for Neighborhood Technology)
  • 9. Practical Benefits of EVs: Fuel Affordability Transportation Costs as % Income Data Not Available Less than 15% 15 to 18% 18 to 20% 20 to 28% 28% and Greater
  • 10.
    • Economies of scale
    • Known driving routes; predictable success
    • Visibility and promotion
  • 11. Type Example Electric Range BEV Battery Electric Vehicle Nissan Leaf 100 miles - all electric. PHEV Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Chevy Volt 40 miles electric, then gasoline backup.
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16. Full-Speed Work Trucks Built in Kansas City
  • 17.  
  • 18.  
  • 19.  
  • 20.  
  • 21. Empty Battery Half-Empty Battery Electricity cost assumes $0.10 / kwh Battery Size 120V 240V Electricity Cost 100 mile/40 kwh 20 hours 5 hours $4.00 40 mile/15 kwh 8 hours 2 hours $1.50 Battery Size 120V 240V Electricity Cost 100 mile/40 kwh 10 hours 2.5 hours $2.00 40 mile/15 kwh 4 hours 1 hour $0.75
  • 22.
    • Communities, Businesses, and Government Working Together
    • Getting Ready for
    • ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION
  • 23.
    • Environmental Improvement
    • Increase Transportation Energy Efficiency
    • Improve Energy Security
    • Increase Economic Activity, Competitiveness, and Jobs
    Those communities who actively prepare for plug-in vehicles will benefit sooner environmentally and will see stronger economic development.
  • 24. Getting Ready Orlando Houston Toronto Raleigh Rhode Island Denver Indianapolis Portland Chicago Los Angeles New York San Francisco Vancouver Nashville/Knoxville Phoenix/Tucson Seattle
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27.
    • Project Get Ready was founded to:
    • Create a vision for plug-in vehicles.
    • Help community stakeholders work together to create a plan to become plug-in-ready.
    • Provide a forum for pioneering communities to openly exchange lessons learned and best practices.
  • 28.
    • Many well-established sectors must change to accommodate plug-ins:
    • Automakers manufacture new drive trains. (New jobs!)
    • Consumers learn the pros and cons of a plug-in lifestyle. (Travel paradigm shift)
    • Utilities manage a large and mobile load. (Smart grid)
    • Cities, retailers, and businesses incorporate a new infrastructure of charge spots.
    • All these players build a new system of connectivity. (Beginning with us)
  • 29.
    • Red tape around infrastructure installation.
    • High upfront costs for consumers.
    • Not enough vehicles in the pipeline.
    • Who will pay for infrastructure?
  • 30.
    • Corporate/city/state commitment.
    • Stakeholder group to assist consumers, align interests, and assist with a regional plan.
    • Work with banks and dealers to offer low-interest loans for plug-ins.
    • Bundle all key incentives at vehicle point of purchase (home charger vouchers, rebates, etc.).
    • Consumer Benefits: access to HOV lanes, free tolls/downtown parking, reserved airport parking.
    • Creative education and marketing plans.
    • Reduced (or free) electricity rates for charging.
  • 31.
    • Fast-track permitting for charging stations.
    • Building codes supporting the operation of plug-ins.
    • Tie provisions of free home and public charge spots, and free or cheaper electricity, to utility override power or “no charge” times.
    • Charge stations provided at local employers/retailers and in high-traffic zones and parking areas with public and private money.
    • Provide affordable and available—or free—Level 2 home-charger/driveway circuit installation.
  • 32.
    • Support non-traditional OEMs, conversion shops, and other businesses with tax incentives, contracts.
    • Plug in owners get access to a “plug-in concierge”. Plug-in service is better than traditional service.
    • Invest in education for plug-in service technicians and plug-in crash safety training for fire/police.
    • Provide cash incentives to consumers for vehicles so that plug-in-premium is eliminated.
    • Introduce a government/3rd party sponsored battery warranty program to share the risk and to reduce the near-term cost of advanced batteries.
  • 33.
    • Launch major marketing plan to highlight the “empowerment, fun and energy independence” associated with plug-ins.
    • Bundle plug-in purchase with a “green power only” utility contract and discounts on home solar.
    • AMI installation, a smart grid upgrade, bike, bus pass, or light rail pass to high-light plug-in role in the green lifestyle.
    • Foster early roll-out in taxi fleets and rental cars.
    • Develop materials to educate the drivers of tomorrow by reaching students of all levels.
    • Install sub-meters (or Smart Grid) for plug-ins.
  • 34. Greater Kansas City Plug-In Readiness Task Force
  • 35.
    • Formed Plug-In Readiness Task Force.
    • Using Project Get Ready Model.
    • Refine Plans – with your help.
    • Implement Plans.
    Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Task Force Formed Approach, Mission, Objective, Sub-teams Defined Stakeholder Conference Develop Plan Implement Plan 2010
  • 36.
    • By August 2010, establish a comprehensive plan for the St. Louis Region that enables widespread adoption of plug-in vehicles, with follow-on implementation of the plan.
  • 37.
    • Form task force.
    • Identify stakeholders.
    • Follow a proven model.
    • Determine the major areas that need to be addressed.
    • Create mission/objectives and sub-teams.
    • Create a plan with community support and involvement.
    • Engage public officials for support.
    • Implement the plan.
    •  
  • 38. Retail Demand Identify and create consumer and business demand for plug-in vehicles Government Policy Encourage adoption of best practices and emerging technology to enable roll-out of plug-in vehicles and easy deployment of infrastructure. Fleet Demand Identify and demonstrate fleet demand for plug-ins to vehicle manufacturers. Charging Infrastructure Ensure there are places to charge plug-in vehicles. Vehicle Availability Accelerate delivery of plug-in vehicles to this area by instilling confidence in the vehicle manufacturers (OEMs) regarding the area’s commitment to purchase and ability to support plug-ins. Incentives Identify incentives to encourage the adoption of plug-in vehicles.
  • 39.
    • Develop strategies and a comprehensive marketing plan to increase consumer demand
  • 40.
    • Create public education and marketing campaign.
    • Create a consumer education center.
    • Create signup mechanism for consumers and fleets to reserve plug-in vehicles.
    • Ensure public comment opportunities.
    • Create plug-in test drives and short term rental programs.
    • Partner with higher education institutions for demonstrations.
    • Build and document vehicle demand.
  • 41.
    • Identify current best practices, and develop strategies and governmental policies that can be adopted by cities, counties, and states to encourage wide-spread adoption of plug-in vehicles and to simplify deployment of infrastructure.
    • Develop a plan for pricing options in consultation with Missouri Public Service Commission (PSC) and Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC).
  • 42.
    • Through review of best practices, identify or develop sample governmental policies which may include but are not limited to:
      • Building codes.
      • Zoning ordinances/codes.
      • Permitting processes.
      • Incentives.
    • Encourage replacement of public and private fleet vehicles with plug-in vehicles as existing vehicles are retired.
    • Coordinate with the PSC and ICC to determine regulatory structure and approach to issue.
    • Coordinate with other subgroup teams to ensure effectiveness and efficiency.
  • 43.
    • Develop strategies and plans to educate fleet owners in developing business cases to commit to the deployment of plug-in vehicles into their fleets where they fit operational requirements.
  • 44.
    • Create education materials and campaigns directed to fleet decision makers.
    • Hold educational events where vehicle manufacturers can present to groups, such as NAFA and APWA, as an outreach to Fleet Managers.
    • Secure soft orders for plug-in fleet vehicles.
    • Identify and demonstrate fleet demand required by manufacturers before they will make plug-in vehicles available here.
  • 45.
    • Develop strategies and a plan to create an organized charging infrastructure in the metro area that includes charging stations at home, at the workplace, in public places, and at fleet facilities.
  • 46.
    • Create a strategy for establishing a network of charging stations.
    • Coordinate with Government Policy Sub-team to ensure building codes, permitting processes, and zoning ordinances support the strategy.
    • Coordinate with electric utility companies to manage impact to grid.
    • Plan the installation of charging infrastructure for public entities, businesses, and electric utilities for fleets and the general public.
  • 47.
    • Coordinate with the permitting authority to facilitate fast and easy installation of home charging station installations.
    • Include regulatory planning in cooperation with the government policy sub-team.
    • Work with government policy sub-team to initiate regulatory framework discussions with PSC and St. Louis.
  • 48.
    • Develop strategies and a plan to create a two-way communication channel with vehicle manufacturers that will define the conditions necessary for them to commit to delivery of plug-in vehicles to St. Louis Region by fall 2010.
  • 49.
    • Determine conditions necessary for OEM deployment of plug-ins to St. Louis by opening a two-way communication channel with major OEMs.
    • Streamline communication to Vehicle Availability stakeholders that might be approached by multiple sub-teams by providing internal communication within St. Louis Plug-In Task Force.
    • Build coalitions and attract businesses to St. Louis that are peripheral to plug-in vehicle manufacturing.
  • 50.
    • Demonstrate existing, and build up new metropolitan plug-in resources, such as training institutions, research bodies, and active plug-in–related coalitions.
      • Technician training program to supply technicians capable of supporting these vehicles.
      • First responder training program .
    • Create a climate that seeks to ensure availability of many types of plug-in vehicles in the area by end of 2010.
  • 51.
    • Develop strategies and a plan for the creation of a menu of incentives encouraging consumer and fleet purchase of plug-in vehicles.
  • 52.
    • Develop state / local incentives to encourage the purchase of plug-in vehicles and charging infrastructure.
      • Financial – tax rebates, purchase tax discounts, minimum fleet levels, registration fee reduction.
      • Non-financial – Special considerations (HOV lanes, priority parking).
    • Develop employee incentive program models for adoption by area employers.
      • Free charging for employees.
      • Employee incentives for vehicle purchase.
      • Preferential parking.
  • 53.
    • Develop funding and financial incentive mechanisms for business and consumers:
      • green power.
      • solar package.
      • charging station.
      • low interest loans.
  • 54.  
  • 55.
    • Please consider joining the Task Force on a sub-team or consulting basis.
    • Contact Kevin for more information.
      • Kevin Herdler
        • St. Louis Regional Clean Cities Coalition
        • 314-397-5308
        • [email_address]