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A brief introduction to service design

A brief introduction to service design

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    An intro to Service design An intro to Service design Presentation Transcript

    • S E R V I C E D E S I G N + D E S I G N I N G B E H A V I O U R A L C H A N G E H E N R Y C H O
    • S E R V I C E D E S I G N
    • W H A T I S I T ?
    • Wikipedia says “Service design is the activity of planning and organising people, infrastructure, communication and material components of a service in order to improve its quality and the interaction between service provider and customers. …"
    • S E R V I C E D E S I G N • Understands the entirety of the system • Understands all the touch points between user and the solution provided whether that be people, software or media • Understands how value is created and moves through the system • Also know as Customer Experience or CX or Design Thinking • Can use traditional or Lean methods
    • B U T I T H I N K T H A T M I S S E S T H E P O I N T
    • S E R V I C E D E S I G N I S A B O U T P E O P L E H O W W I L L Y O U T R E A T Who are your customers? What are their problems? How are they feeling? Where are they? Who do they talk to ? Who do they trust? Who are you?
    • • Service design is a human centred design process that ensures that we engage people with maximum empathy to create connection and loyalty
    • I S T I L L D O N ' T Q U I T E G E T I T ?
    • O K S O H O W D O W E D O I T ?
    • 5 S T E P S O F D E S I G N T H I N K I N G E M P A T H I S E D E F I N E I D E A T E P R O T O T Y P E T E S T
    • E M P A T H I S E To understand the plight of our users at a deeply human level
    • C H A N G E O U R F O C U S
    • E M P A T H Y I S T H E A B I L I T Y T O B L U R T H E L I N E B E T W E E N S E L F A N D O T H E R S
    • E M P A T H I S E I M M E R S E O B S E R V E E N G A G E
    • E M P A T H I S E S T O R Y M A P S E M P A T H Y M A P S C U S T O M E R J O U R N E Y M A P S S T A K E H O L D E R M A P S
    • S T O R Y M A P S
    • E M P A T H Y M A P S
    • C U S T O M E R J O U R N E Y M A P S
    • S T A K E H O L D E R M A P S
    • D E F I N E When we read the story of our users, what is the twist in the plot that reveals the real problem that they are facing?
    • D E F I N E U S E R S N E E D S I N S I G H T S
    • D E F I N E P O I N T O F V I E W Specific User] needs to [ Need] because [ Surprising Insigh
    • W H A T A R E T H E I R N E E D S ?
    • I D E A T E Where exploration of ideas runs wild
    • I D E A T E H O W M I G H T W E
    • H O W M I G H T W E Enable “accidental” social interactions
    • P R O T O T Y P E Create something that we can test
    • P R O T O T Y P E S K E T C H W I R E F R A M E S S T O R YB O A R D S I N T E R A C T I V E P R O T O T YP E S
    • S T O R YB O A R D S
    • S K E T C H W I R E F R A M E S
    • T E S T Bleed on the mat not on the street
    • T E S T U S A B I L I T Y T E S T I N G C O N C E P T T E S T I N G C O N C I E R G E T E S T I N G
    • I T E R A T E S E R V I C E B L U E P R I N T D E S T I N A T I O N S T A T E M E N T P R O O F O F C O N C E P T
    • Laura Esserman, a surgeon and professor at the University of California at San Francisco, and a graduate of the Stanford Business School, is engaged in a major effort to change the service breast cancer, and information systems used to support research and patient care. C H A N G I N G T R E A T M E N T
    • E M P A T H I S E
    • E M P A T H I S E Dr Esserman realised that while the individual efforts of the doctors, radiologists, therapists and specialist were exemplary on their own.
    • D E F I N E The service was a mess
    • D E F I N E R A D I O L O G Y G E N E R A L P R A C T I C E S P E C I A L I S T B I O P S Y S U R G E R Y T H E R A P I S T S
    • D E S T I N A T I O N S T A T E M E N T What if there were a breast care clinic where a woman worried about a lump could walk in at the beginning of the day and walk out at the end of the day with an answer- either knowing that a lump was no problem, or if it was a problem, having a treatment plan already in hand
    • O U T C O M E • From 1997 to 2003 the number of patients per week grew from 175 to 1,300 • The centre became a major revenue source for UCSF and recognised leader in treatment
    • B E H A V I O U R D E S I G N
    • N I R E Y A L ’ S H O O K M O D E L
    • V A R I A B L E R E W A R D The power behind the one armed bandit
    • B J F O G G S B E H A V I O U R M O D E L
    • A B I L I T Y Do not underestimate the power of inertia
    • G A M E D E S I G N E R S Who builds addiction better?
    • A M Y J O K I M ’ S P L A Y E R S J O U R N E Y
    • T I M E It really does change all things
    • P U R P O S E , B E L O N G I N G A N D C O N N E C T I O N
    • T H A N K Y O U
    • S T A Y I N T O U C H H E N R Y . G . C H O @ G M A I L . C O M @ H A N K A T R O N I C