Research portfolios1 2013_2014 jan july 2014

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Dear students,
The four Applied Research Groups of HZ Delta Academy offer several possibilities for minors, internships and final thesis in the coming semester . See appendix in this email. An important characteristic of the applied research of Delta Academy is the valorization of research into practice. The subjects in the appendix are divers and challenging and we offer an inspiring and instructive environment with excellent supervision. For more information get in contact with the coordinators of the research groups:
1) Aquaculture in Delta Areas: Jouke Heringa (jouke.heringa@hz.nl)
2) Building with Nature: Carla Pesch (c.j.pesch@hz.nl)
3) Watertechnology: Hans Cappon (hans.cappon@hz.nl)
4) Resilient Delta: Dick Fundter (dick.fundter@hz.nl)

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Research portfolios1 2013_2014 jan july 2014

  1. 1. RESEARCH PORTFOLIO ASSIGNMENTS FEBRUARY 2014 – JULY 2014 DA – APPLIED RESEARCH CENTRE DECEMBER 2013
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS DELTA APPLIED RESEARCH CENTRE 3 RESEARCH GROUP AQUACULTURE IN DELTA AREAS 5 Optimization of algae production in a natural pond 5 Algal quality in relation to shellfish production 6 Heterotrophic algae as feed for shellfish 6 The use of heterotrophic algae in live feed production 7 Influencing algal quality by means of cultivation parameters 7 Feeding trials oysters 7 Cultivating Red Mosquito larvae 8 Effects of dead shell material between mussel seed as protection against dislodgement 8 Mussel survival, condition and spatial organization at different starting densities under equal and unequal per capita food levels 9 Case study of productivity factors of a longline mussel culture in the Eastern Scheldt estuary 9 Assessing the food availability for shellfish, using deployable fluorometers 10 Shellfish production model: literature study 10 Shellfish production parameters in off-bottom and in-bottom cultures in the Dutch delta 11 A comparison of oyster quality between oysters from different production methods and origin 12 Environmental effects of off-bottom oyster production 12 Novel non-destructive technological techniques to measure shellfish biometrics and performance indices 13 In situ removal of epibionts and starfish from mussel ropes in longline systems and spat mussel collectors 13 RESEARCH GROUP BUILDING WITH NATURE 14 Research: get the picture! 14 Survey of the salt marsh adjacing the inlet to Rammegors polder 15 Colonization and regrowth of the salt marsh vegetation 15 Deterioration of vegetation 16 Spatial distribution of benthos communities 16 Sediment dynamics in the Eastern part of the Eastern Scheldt Oesterdam 16 Diamonds and lines – Concrete Stuctures in dykes 17 Are rocks more nature friendly? Currently, dikes and foreshores are designed for flood protection, safety and sustainability. The Building for Nature approach aims at innovating the design of these safety structures, thereby adding nature values. Dikes with this type of additional structures are called rich dikes, or rich revetments. The addition of structures make these dikes more of interest for other use, such as diving, fishing, aquaculture production. In a first exploratory research, a number of biodiversity assessments of dikes at the Eastern Scheldt were analysed for the effect of vertical position, roughness and water retention on biodiversity. In this research you will compare different types of natural materials with a concrete block and different positions in the dyke to assess which one perform better and why. You will be responsible for the whole set-up and the analysis of the results. 17 Building for Nature information management 18 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 1 February – July 2014
  3. 3. The use of GIS for bio-geographic information on the Eastern Scheldt Analysis of target groups within Rijkswaterstaat Governance and the implementation of Building with Nature solutions Formulating a thesaurus for Building with Nature RESEARCH GROUP WATER TECHNOLOGY 18 19 19 20 21 Removal or reduction of highly concentrated pesticides from greenhouse wastewater 21 Enhancing the biodegradability of cooling tower blowdown using advanced oxidation processes 21 Ultrasonic disruption of algae and analysis of released compounds 22 Inventory of nutrient availability for recycling 22 Operational characteristics of ultrafiltration processes 22 Pilot plant Harnaschpolder ( Delft, The Hague), Evides & Veolia & Rossmark 22 Determining the optimum process conditions for pretreatment and NF for mild desalination (Dow, Evides, Terneuzen) 23 Dow Terneuzen BV 23 Wetsus 23 Shell Ned Chemie BV 23 RESEARCH GROUP SAFETY & SPATIAL PLANNING 24 Resilient Deltas project 2013-2014 (Raak project) Waterpoort 2014 (Centre of Expertise project) 24 25 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 2 February – July 2014
  4. 4. DELTA APPLIED RESEARCH CENTRE De Delta Academy, haar onderwijs en haar onderzoek richten zich primair op hbo en hbo+ niveau. Hierbinnen bestaat het Delta Academy Applied Research Centre (DA-ARC). Hier werken meer dan 30 docent/onderzoekers aan heel verschillend onderzoek in vier onderzoekgroepen op het gebied van Watertechnologie, Veiligheid en Gebiedsinrichting, Aquacultuur in Deltagebieden en Bouwen met Natuur. Het type onderzoek dat in de Delta Academy wordt uitgevoerd is praktijkgericht onderzoek. Daaronder wordt onderzoek verstaan dat uitgevoerd wordt voor en samen met bedrijven, overheden en kennisinstituten in de regio en daarbuiten. Het onderzoek vindt plaats door het genereren van nieuwe kennis en inzichten, maar ook door het leveren van praktisch toepasbare producten en concrete oplossingen voor praktijkproblemen. Het onderzoek kent een nauwe relatie met het onderwijs via de bijdrage aan onderwijsactiviteiten, via cursussen, veldwerk en laboratorium onderzoek. Veel studenten zijn via de onderzoekgroepen bij bedrijven aan de slag in stages, minoren en afstudeerprojecten. Het onderzoek in de Delta Academy maakt bijvoorbeeld door universiteiten ontwikkelde kennis toepasbaar maken voor bedrijven. Veel ontwikkelde kennis is niet zomaar geschikt voor directe toepassing in de praktijk; door het toegepaste onderzoek van de hogescholen komt de kennis ter beschikking van bedrijven in de vorm van bijvoorbeeld producten en ontwerpen. De Delta Academy sluit aan bij de ambitie en de beleidsmatige ruimte van de Provincie Zeeland om het deltagebied ook als laboratorium te benutten. Leading Lector: Mindert de Vries (mindert.devries@hz.nl) Zie http://hz.nl/nl/werkenleren/Kennisdeling%20en%20samenwerking/Applied%20Research%20Center/Pa ges/Applied-Research-Center.aspx op de HZ website voor verdere informatie over de onderzoekgroepen. Zie https://nl-nl.facebook.com/HZDeltaAcademy voor actuele informatie van onderzoek en onderwijs ******* ENGLISH TEXT **************************************************************** The Delta Academy, her education and research are focused on Bachelor level. The Delta Academy Applied Research Centre (DA-ARC) is part of the Delta Academy. Within the DA-ARC four research groups exist, focusing on (1) Water Technology, (2) Aquaculture in Delta Areas, (3) Safety and Spatial Development and (4) Building with Nature. Within the DA-ARC at least 30 part time researchers are involved in research. Within the Delta Academy three international bachelor studies are working together with the research groups. The research that is executed in the DA-ARC is so called applied research. It means that we carry out research in intense cooperation with various clients, such as commercial firms (SME) and public institutes in the Netherlands , sometimes in international consortia. The research produces new knowledge and insights and delivers practical solutions and products to the clients. The research is linked to education programs in the Delta Academy through courses, fieldwork and work in our laboratory facility SEA Lab. Many students that work in our research groups are linked with our clients through internships, minors and research-assignments. See http://hz.nl/nl/werkenleren/Kennisdeling%20en%20samenwerking/Applied%20Research%20Center/Pa researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 3 February – July 2014
  5. 5. ges/Applied-Research-Center.aspx for further information on the research groups. See https://nlnl.facebook.com/HZDeltaAcademy for our actual status of our research and education. Leading Lector of DA-ARC: Mindert de Vries (mindert.devries@hz.nl) researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 4 February – July 2014
  6. 6. RESEARCH GROUP AQUACULTURE IN DELTA AREAS Research group Aquaculture in Delta Areas of the Delta Academy has its focus on sustainable saline aquaculture in and outside the region Zeeland. Aquaculture is the controlled production of saline crops, algae, seaweed, ragworms, shellfish and fish. Cultivation of these organisms can take place in several (intensive and extensive) ways. The research group Aquaculture has built up an extensive network of Small and Medium Enterprises (SME), consultancies and knowledge institutes involved in aquaculture in and outside the Netherlands. The main research topics are; Integrated Multi Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA), new species to the Dutch situation (such as lobster and abalone), improvement of cultivation environments, groundwater suitability, quality aspects in shellfish cultivation and algae cultivation. The research group Aquaculture uses a full-fledged research facility SEA Lab, in which many applied research (experiments) are carried out. Minor/ Internship/ final thesis topics OPTIMIZATION OF ALGAE PRODUCTION IN A NATURAL POND KMWP in Wilhelminadorp has a pilot pond system to cultivate shellfish. The algae (Skeletonema costatum) for the shellfish are grown in a natural pond, fed with saline groundwater. The shellfish ponds are fed with the algae from the natural pond. The last few years, macro algae (seaweed) covered the substratum of the algae pond, resulting in lower growth of algae due to nutrient competition and flow retardation. The problem was tackled by mechanically removing the macro algae. To increase algae production, the pond is currently inoculated with a dense Skeletonema culture grown in a nearby raceway. Limited amounts of nutrients are added to keep the algae in the pond in the exponential growth phase, however disappearing of the algae enhances the growth of seaweed. The disappearance of the alga can be due to many factors that by themselves are unimportant but all together could be the cause. Examples of causes that have been found to impact the algae production are; low flow through speed in the pond, low to none vertical water displacement, competition over nutrients, predation by pests, etc. Another problem are the lagoon cockles, which have greatly increased in biomass in the pond and filter the algae out of the water before reaching the shellfish ponds. Recent data show that the pond contains about 6 tons lagoon cockles. The problems have to be tackled and solutions need to be tested in order to optimize the natural algae pond. If a constant and continuous algae production can be realized in a natural algae pond, the profitability and prospect of land based shellfish cultivation increases. Changes in the pond system can possibly be found in change of algae species, prevention of seaweed and lagoon cockles (both biologically or mechanically), change in water flow (horizontal versus vertical) and other parameters. The research will take place in Wilhelminadorp in close cooperation with the manager of the pond. Some labwork will take place in the (SEA-)Lab in Vlissingen. Research type: literature study, practical experiments (Wilhelminadorp) Research level: minor/internship Prerequisite: good understanding of ecology and biology/chemistry; good analytical skills; drivers license; student will be working most of the time on location researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 5 February – July 2014
  7. 7. Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Tony van der Hiele) Period: 2nd semester 2013-14 ALGAL QUALITY IN RELATION TO SHELLFISH PRODUCTION At this different locations in the Province of Zeeland, companies farm shellfish (mussels, oysters and clams) in ponds. These shellfish species are fed with cultured algae. The best feed for shellfish are living algae. Algae production in ponds and bioreactors is in most cases significantly lower in winter then in summer. Therefor in some periods there is a surplus of algae, in other periods there is not enough feed (algae) for the standing stock of shellfish in the ponds. Companies (farming both algae and shellfish on land) are interested how to store a surplus of algae in such a way that the quality of the algae as feed for shellfish is maintained and the algae can be used in periods of a deficit of algae. Earlier research by students revealed a promising technique, namely flocculation. By means of flocculation the total volume to be stored can be reduced enormously. However the quality of the algae were not measured up to now. The quality of the algae could be tested in two ways: chemically (analytical measurements) and biologically (feeding trails with shellfish). Research type: literature study, experiments (HZ, Vlissingen) Research level: minor/internship/final thesis Prerequisite: good understanding of ecology/chemistry; good analytical skills; communicative Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Wessel Bakhuizen and Jasper van Houcke) Period: 2nd semester 2013-14 HETEROTROPHIC ALGAE AS FEED FOR SHELLFISH At this different locations in the Province of Zeeland, companies farm shellfish (mussels, oysters and clams) in ponds. These shellfish species are fed with cultured algae. Even though it is said to be the best feed for algae the cost price for the algae are quite high. In order to reduce cost of feed (algae) partial replacement of live algae by heterotrophic algae could be interesting. Heterotrophic algae have a lower cost price, however the essential fatty acids requirements for shellfish are not completely met by the fatty acid profile of the heterotrophic algae. Experimental work should give us insight in the feasibility of using heterotrophic algae and their maximum incorporation in the diets of shellfish. Model species as the Blue mussel and the pacific oyster will be used. Research type: literature study, experiments (HZ, Vlissingen) Research level: minor/ internship/final thesis Prerequisite: good understanding of biology/chemistry; good analytical skills; communicative Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Wessel Bakhuizen and Jasper van Houcke) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 6 February – July 2014
  8. 8. THE USE OF HETEROTROPHIC ALGAE IN LIVE FEED PRODUCTION In the production of fish fingerlings live feed (such as rotifers, copepods and artemia) are still very important in the first feeding of fish larvae. The growth and the survival of these fish larvae are known to be related to the nutritional value of the live feed. Unfortunately the ‘stand-alone’ nutritional value of hatched rotifers or copepod and artemia nauplii is not high. The techniques used to improve the nutritional value (feeding with algae or enrichment emulsions) are common practice but are very expensive. To cut costs (or labor for cultivating algae) the use of heterotrophic algae might be interesting. A literature review linked with experimental work (enriching copepods and rotifers) should give us insight in the feasibility of using heterotrophic algae. Research type: literature study, experiments (HZ, Vlissingen) Research level: minor/ internship/final thesis Prerequisite: good understanding of biology/chemistry; good analytical skills; communicative Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Wessel Bakhuizen and Jasper van Houcke) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 INFLUENCING ALGAL QUALITY BY MEANS OF CULTIVATION PARAMETERS The quality of algal biomass is up until now defined by fatty acid composition, however in other feed sources factors play a role as well (for instance protein content and amino acid profile). On top of this the composition of algae is (partly) dependent on the cultivation parameters (such as light, nutrient concentrations, cultivation system, etc.). Literature study should lead to algal quality parameters and ways to influence these parameters. Based on this literature research an experimental set-up should be designed. Experimental work should lead to different (wanted) algal qualities. This project involves several short small scale experiments. Analytical measurement could be done in combination with chemistry students. Research type: literature study, experiments (HZ, Vlissingen) Research level: minor/ internship/final thesis Prerequisite: good understanding of biology/chemistry; good analytical skills; communicative Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Pim van Dalen and Jasper van Houcke) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 FEEDING TRIALS OYSTERS From literature it is known the flavor (taste and smell) of oysters can be influenced by the diet (algal species). For instance fatty acids can play an important role in the formation of odors in oysters. A next step in this research is to start up the actual practical work. This involves cultivation of different algal species, diet formulations and to start feeding trails. Even though this might sound easy, it’s quite complex. The oysters should be fed with the right amount of algae on the right time, algae should be onhand sufficiently at all times and oysters should be carefully monitored. Experimental design and planning will be very important in this research project. researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 7 February – July 2014
  9. 9. This research will take place in the lab in Vlissingen and involves cultivation of algae (different species) and oysters, water quality analysis and biological measurements (algal counts, growth, condition index). The cultivated oysters will be assessed in a sensory analysis using trained panellists. Research type: literature study, experimental work Research level: minor/internship Prerequisite: good understanding of biology; good analytical skills; communicative; punctual; good planning skills Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Wessel Bakhuizen and Jasper van Houcke) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 CULTIVATING RED MOSQUITO LARVAE The demand for locally produced Red Mosquito larvae in the aquaria sector is, because of sustainability issues, increasing. Nowadays most of the Red Mosquito larvae are imported from either Eastern Europe or (on a larger level) China. This means that larvae are transported over large distances. Furthermore since water quality in the earlier mentioned regions are also improving , there might be a shortage in the future. The experience with cultivation Red Mosquito larvae is limited in the Netherlands. The research group aquaculture has been asked to conduct a feasibility study (with experimental work) on the cultivation of these larvae. From a sustainability issue it would be beneficial to use effluent (or other waste products) from the local industries. Research type: literature study, experiments (HZ, Vlissingen) Research level: minor/ internship/final thesis Prerequisite: good understanding of biology; good analytical skills; communicative Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Wessel Bakhuizen and Jasper van Houcke) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 EFFECTS OF DEAD SHELL MATERIAL BETWEEN MUSSEL SEED AS PROTECTION AGAINST DISLODGEMENT In The Netherlands mussels are cultured extensively on culture plots in (sub)tidal areas in the Eastern Scheldt and Wadden Sea. In extensive culture growth and survival are determined by local abiotic and biotic conditions. The mussel culture cycle starts with seeding of small mussels on culture plots, from where they grow to consumption size. In order to increase survival some mussel farmers mix mussel seed with dead shell material, to which mussel can attach. When mussels are more firmly attached it is believed that this will reduce dislodgement risk. This hypothesis will be tested under controlled conditions. In this experiment mussel seed will be exposed to increasing velocities with and without dead shell material, attachment strength and dislodgment risk will be measured and compared. In repeated experiments within this setup, different environmental conditions will be mimicked,. This experiment can take place in the (Sea)lab in Vlissingen. The assignment includes designing and building a laboratory flume. researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 8 February – July 2014
  10. 10. Research type: controlled experiment in SEA Lab Research level: minor Perquisite: understanding of basic statistics, good technical skills Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Jacob Capelle) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 MUSSEL SURVIVAL, CONDITION AND SPATIAL ORGANIZATION AT DIFFERENT STARTING DENSITIES UNDER EQUAL AND UNEQUAL PER CAPITA FOOD LEVELS Previous scientific research showed that mussels reorganize after relaying and that this reorganization process is probably increasing mussel loss. Relaying of mussels occurs in on-bottom mussel culture, in a process called seeding. Survival of mussels during seeding defines for a substantial part biomass yield of the culture process. Understanding of mussel dynamics in a short period after seeding is needed to address what possible culture management during seeding will increase survival in a short period thereafter. For this topic two experiments will be performed, one under equal and one under unequal per capita food levels, with mussels in a range of densities. Spatial aggregation, survival and mussel condition index will be compared between treatments. Research type: controlled experiment Research level: internship/final thesis Perquisite: good understanding of biology, analytical skills, dedicated, involves flexible time management Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Jacob Capelle) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 CASE STUDY OF PRODUCTIVITY FACTORS OF A LONGLINE MUSSEL CULTURE IN THE EASTERN SCHELDT ESTUARY The largest longline mussel culture in the Eastern Scheldt is in a former harbor at Neeltje Jans, build during the construction of the storm surge barrier. In longline culture mussels are attached to ropes, (longlines) and socked in, from where they grow to consumption mussels in one or two years’ time. The culture area is semi-enclosed, water exchange within this harbor is provided by only one connection to the Eastern Scheldt. Mussel production on the longlines is dependent on environmental conditions, like food concentration in the water column, current through the system and effects at culture systems scale, like mussel density, rope density and rope depth. Within the framework of the ProfMos project, research is done in close collaboration with the mussel growing company on by what factors yield is determined and how production can be optimized. In order to address these questions, mussels will be monitored throughout the system, velocity profiles will be created and food and nutrient budgets need to be calculated. This requires a lot of onshore and offshore fieldwork and good communication skills in order to communicate with the mussel farmer at the culture site, where a substantial amount of time will be spend. researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 9 February – July 2014
  11. 11. Research type: fieldwork including mussel and nutrient sampling (at Neeltje Jans), labwork including nutrient analysis and (optional) modelling Research level: internship/final thesis Perquisite: good understanding of biology, analytical skills, car license, good planning skills, communication skills Researcher involved: research group aquacult ure (Eva Hartog and Jacob Capelle) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 ASSESSING THE FOOD AVAILABILITY FOR SHELLFISH, USING DEPLOYABLE FLUOROMETERS In the Eastern Scheldt, Lake Veere and Lake Grevelingen, oysters and mussels are cultivated. Next to the conventional bottom culture of shellfish, oysters are cultivated in baskets and mussels are cultivated on ropes. Since these are relative new methods in the Netherlands, the shellfish farmers have lots of practical questions about the management of these systems. The goal of RAAK project Saline Production is to optimize the cultivation of oysters in baskets, and mussels in rope culture in the Dutch delta. One of the most influentual factors for shellfish growth, is food availability. With the use of deployable fluorometers, the variation of chlorofyl-a content (as indicator for algae content) needs to become clear. Both fluctuation in time as spatial variation of chlorofyl-a on a shellfish cultivation plots is relevant to know. Part of the assignment is to check the accuracy of the fluorometers by testing the chlorofyl-a content of cultivated algae in the SEA Lab. The other part is sampling of shellfish plots to get insight in temporal and spatial variation of chlorofyl-a by placing the fluorometers in the field and analyzing the data. Research type: practical experiments (Lake Veere, Eastern Scheldt and SEA-Lab), literature research, data analysis Research level: minor/ internship Prerequisite: good understanding of biology/ecology/chemistry; good analytical skills; driver’s license Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Jorik Creemers) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 SHELLFISH PRODUCTION MODEL: LITERATURE STUDY In September 2013 a so-called RAAK PRO project ‘Saline production’ has been granted. This project involves a 4 year study in optimizing near shore shellfish culture in Lake Grevelingen, Lake Veere and Eastern Scheldt in the South West Delta Region. Focus in the project is on off bottom (in cages) of oyster farming, bottom culture of manila clams and rope culture of mussels in close cooperation with local producers, companies and research institutes (a.o. Imares). Main goal is to increase on site (farm scale) shell fish production, based on local (farm scale) circumstances like food availability and develop a decision support tool for that for the farmers. The decision support tool will be developed in the form of a mathematical production model. A 0-D farm model is currently developed, based on an existing growth model (the Dynamic Energy Budget model) and describes growth and mortality based on environmental factors like temperature, algae concentration, flow rate and other factors. Apart from the above mentioned environmental researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 10 February – July 2014
  12. 12. factors, one of the input variables for the production model will also be the amount of shellfish which are put into the farm (the farm is simulated as a 0-D box). A literature study is necessary to get a grip on density dependent food uptake and to describe the relations for the different shellfish species (mussels, oysters, clams and cockles) between stocking density and food uptake, and between food transport/ flow rate and food availability/uptake. The challenge is to collect the above mentioned relations described in the literature and figure out if and how they can be used in the farm production model. Student(s) will work closely together with researchers from IMARES and research group Aquaculture in Delta Areas. Research type: literature study Research level: minor/internship Prerequisite: good understanding of ecology, biology of shellfish and hydrology; good analytical and mathematical skills; good planning skills Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Tony van der Hiele) and IMARES nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 SHELLFISH PRODUCTION PARAMETERS IN OFF-BOTTOM AND IN-BOTTOM CULTURES IN THE DUTCH DELTA This assignment is part of the project Saline Production, in which optimization of shellfish production by different innovative methods in the Dutch delta is investigated. Production is determined by growth and survival of starting material, often juvenile shellfish. Monitoring and measurements are carried out on different culture systems and cultured species. Culture systems and species under research include: longline mussel culture, oysters (Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis) in baskets, bags and flupsies, carpet shells and cockles in-bottom on culture plots. This project has several unique features for the Dutch delta: new culture methods, new species and new locations. As a result shellfish growers have a lot of questions regarding production: on optimal densities, on growth rates, on optimal spatial use, on quality, etc. We are looking for a student, that will take part in getting an answering to some of these questions, which are often interrelated. Work includes: taking and processing samples from the different culture systems, process results on growth, mortality and quality (meat weight, shell shape and fouling) as function of: shellfish density, location within the culture system for different culture systems and different culture areas. Research type: combination of field work and lab work Research level: internship/final thesis Prerequisite: understanding of basic ecological principles, driving license Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Jouke Heringa) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 11 February – July 2014
  13. 13. A COMPARISON OF OYSTER QUALITY BETWEEN OYSTERS FROM DIFFERENT PRODUCTION METHODS AND ORIGIN Market demands for high quality oysters is higher current production in the Dutch delta. A group of oyster growers are starting with a new initiative to culture oysters off-bottom, in baskets and bags (on tables). Whether this method is successful and allows up-scaling, is dependent on the growth and quality of the oyster from these new production methods and the cost-price per oyster. Growth and quality should be improved, compared to oysters from on-bottom plots, which is the traditional oyster culture in The Netherlands and should be at least comparable to oysters imported from France. The objective of this assignment is to test differences in oyster quality and to quantify cost-price per oyster for the different oysters under study. Also students with an economic background can apply to work on the part of cost-prices of different methods of oyster production, compare import prices and identify efficiency targets. Research type: combination of field work and lab work (production) or/and desk study and interviews (economics) Research level: minor/internship/final thesis Prerequisite: driving license, exactitude, good communication skills Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Jacob Capelle) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF OFF-BOTTOM OYSTER PRODUCTION Market demands for high quality oysters is higher than current production in the Dutch delta. A group of oyster growers are starting with a new initiative to culture oysters off-bottom, in baskets and bags (on tables). Structure of culture systems and activities around them will have an impact on the local environment. This impact needs to be quantified. Two types of impact will be estimated. First, impacts on nature, by effects on bird appearance, species and foraging behavior and second, impact on safety, by effects of culture structure on shore line safety, e.g. by reducing wave energy. Students can apply for both impact studies or choose only one of them. Research type: field work Research level: minor/internship/final thesis Prerequisite: driving license, bird identification skills (for impact on nature) Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Jacob Capelle) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 12 February – July 2014
  14. 14. NOVEL NON-DESTRUCTIVE TECHNOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES TO MEASURE SHELLFISH BIOMETRICS AND PERFORMANCE INDICES Shellfish biometrics (length, shape, area) and meat content or condition are important parameters in scientific experiments and for shellfish growers. Measurement of these parameters is currently done by hand, which is very labor consuming. To obtain meat content or condition shellfish need to be opened to remove the meat, which is off course a lethal method for shellfish. We like to challenge students with a technical background to draw up an inventory of methods (X-ray, NMR, laser) from other sectors to automate these processes, or to obtain parameters by non-destructive methods. It is furthermore encouraged to design a prototype that could be successful based on the inventory assessment (e.g. a laser scanner to measure length or shape). Research type: interviews, literature study and design Research level: minor/internship/final thesis Prerequisite: technical background, out-of-the-box thinking Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Jouke Heringa) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 IN SITU REMOVAL OF EPIBIONTS AND STARFISH FROM MUSSEL ROPES IN LONGLINE SYSTEMS AND SPAT MUSSEL COLLECTORS Epibionts like tunicates and predators like starfish are reducing production in longline mussel culture systems and spat mussel collectors (SMCs). Removal is difficult because these systems are submerged and it requires equipment and effort to get the longlines exposed. The only method currently employed to get rid of starfish is handpicking, which is very labor intensive. Mussels have the ability to close their shells under suboptimal conditions and can tolerate wide fluctuations in environmental variables. Invertebrates without shells, like starfish or tunicates are more sensitive to fluctuations in environmental variables, like salinity or temperature. We can make use of this difference by expose mussels with epibionts and predators to short fluctuations in environmental conditions and extrapolate this into a method, which can be applied in situ from a ship on submerged mussels on ropes. Research type: lab experiments Research level: minor/internship/final thesis Prerequisite: understanding of biology, good technical skills, creativity Researcher involved: research group aquaculture (Jacob Capelle) nd Period: 2 semester 2013-14 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 13 February – July 2014
  15. 15. RESEARCH GROUP BUILDING WITH NATURE Introduction As a result of changes in societal demand and technical developments, water management and engineering are moving from hard traditional structures like dikes and dams, to designs in which natural structures and processes are incorporated. One of the underlying factors in this development is the increasing awareness of the impacts of climate change and its effect on water levels and extreme events. Furthermore, water managers are expected to create more safety, opportunities for recreation, and other benefits, with increasingly smaller budgets. This requires infrastructure that combines multiple functions. In our research group we work on application of the Building with Nature concept. ‘Building with Nature’ focusses on solutions that use abiotic forces of nature (e.g. wind and currents that transport sand) and ecosystem services delivered by organisms (e.g. reefs and vegetation that catch and stabilize sand). The research group also focusses on Building for Nature: creating additional nature values in and on monofunctional structures such as dikes. Current research themes include 1) Optimizing the design of Building with Living Nature structures such as oyster reefs or salt marshes, used for coastal protection and nature development 2) Identification of the effects of Building with Living Nature solutions in the Eastern Scheldt on the functioning (other ecosystem functions) of the Eastern Scheldt 3) Design and implementation of Building with Nature solutions for flood protection, including safety assessments for the specific building blocks and the acquisition of permits 4) Design and implementation of Building for Nature applications 5) Transfer of knowledge by means of an expertise management method 6) Research on structures and processes in water systems. This generates knowledge that is needed for the design of Building with Nature solutions RESEARCH: GET THE PICTURE! In this project, the whole process of experimental design, sampling methods in the field and data collection, processing of samples in the lab, data analysis and presentation of results will be elaborated. The output will consist of short films and manuals explaining in detail each step of the scientific process. The research techniques elaborated will focus on research related to the subjects covered by the research group such as sampling vegetation and benthic fauna and hard vs. soft substrate sampling, identification of species. Research type: literature study, creating situations that represent stages in research Research level: bachelor minor Prerequisite: ability to think systematically, interest in research Customer: Carla Pesch, Anneke vd Brink Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 14 February – July 2014
  16. 16. SURVEY OF THE SALT MARSH ADJACING THE INLET TO RAMMEGORS POLDER The opening of the polder at Rammegors to the Oosterschelde will create major changes for the currently freshwater area. In this project you will conduct an in depth survey of the area just outside the future inlet the polder. You will look at the benthos and vegetation and their zonation in relation to abiotic factors in this well established habitat. Using the data you collect and information from the literature about the life histories and habitat preferences of the species present outside the inlet, you will develop and present your expectations of how the biodiversity inside the Rammegors polder will develop over time and space. Research type: field research, literature research Research level: bachelor internship Prerequisite: interest in vegetation and ecology Customer: Anneke vd Brink, Carla Pesch Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 COLONIZATION AND REGROWTH OF THE SALT MARSH VEGETATION When freshwater marsh at The Rammegors will get under tidal influence and become salt again after 40 years, the flora will adapt. Many freshwater marsh species will be replaced by salt marsh species. Recolonization will take place through the seed bank within the sediment and by seed and shoots coming from other marshes. The Building with Nature research group wants to learn about the recolonization process and compare the speed of recolonization to the speed of regrowth. Within a healthy existing salt marsh bare patches are created at old and pioneer zones by weeding and burying. Three treatments will be applied: 1) covering an area with 5 cm of sand, 2) taking out the top 5 cm of marsh and filling up the area with 5 cm of sand and 3) taking out the top 5 cm of marsh, put plastic at the bottom, and filling up the area with 5 cm of sand. Treatment 1 will enable us to look at plant resilience to burying, treatment 2 will enable us to see if the marsh can reestablish from the seed bank and incoming seeds, treatment 3 will enable us to see if the marsh can reestablish from incoming seeds and shoots only. Research type: field research, literature research and desk analysis Research level: Water management students and/or Civil engineering students; minor, internship or graduation bachelor thesis project. Prerequisite: interest in ecology, morphology, and fluid dynamics Customer: Tim van Oijen Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 15 February – July 2014
  17. 17. DETERIORATION OF VEGETATION The opening of the polder at Rammegors to the Oosterschelde will create major changes for the currently freshwater area. As a consequence, freshwater vegetation is going to die of stress induced by the tidal salt water environment. In this project you will evaluate the consequences of the death of fresh water vegetation in a saline environment, taking in account several parameters (eg. velocity of decay, organic content in soil and water, etc.). For this research you have to perform field work but also to prepare a set-up for the research at HZ. Research type: field and lab research, desk research. Research level: Water Management students, minor, internship Prerequisite: interest in physical processes, practical skills, interest in ecology, Customer: Tim van Oijen Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF BENTHOS COMMUNITIES The Eastern Scheldt is an important part of the Dutch delta for nature development, recreation and aquaculture. Since the finalization of the storm surge barrier, however, the Eastern Scheldt is suffering from a sand deficit problem. This causes the plates to erode, which in its turn, has an effect on foraging space and time for birds. The “Oesterdam safety-buffer project” is a pilot project that focusses on the effects of the sand deficit problem. It combines a sand nourishment with artificial oyster reefs. Implementation in the field has been realized at the end of 2013. In this assignment, you will monitor the spatial distribution of (benthos) communities and their development over time, on the sand nourishments at the project location. Research type: field research, lab research, literature research Research level: Bachelor minor Prerequisite: interest in ecology, good analytical skills Customer: Carla Pesch, Anneke vd Brink Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 SEDIMENT DYNAMICS IN THE EASTERN PART OF THE EASTERN SCHELDT OESTERDAM The Eastern Scheldt is an important part of the Dutch delta for nature development, recreation and aquaculture. Since the finalization of the storm surge barrier, however, the Eastern Scheldt is suffering from a sand deficit problem. This causes the plates to erode, which in its turn, has an effect on foraging space and time for birds. The “Oesterdam safety-buffer project” is a pilot project that focusses on the effects of the sand deficit problem. It combines a sand nourishment with artificial oyster reefs. Implementation in the field has been realized at the end of 2013. In this assignment, you will monitor morphological aspects in by means of a sediment trend analysis based on detailed grainsize distributions over the area. researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 16 February – July 2014
  18. 18. Research type: Desk and field research; lab analysis with a Malvern; and desk analysis Research level: Water management students and/or Civil engineering students; minor or internship. Prerequisite: interest in morphology and fluid dynamics Customer: Matthijs Boersema, João Paiva Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 DIAMONDS AND LINES – CONCRETE STUCTURES IN DYKES Currently, dikes and foreshores are designed for flood protection, safety and sustainability. The Building for Nature approach aims at innovating the design of these safety structures, thereby adding nature values. Dikes with this type of additional structures are called rich dikes, or rich revetments. The addition of structures make these dikes more of interest for other use, such as diving, fishing, aquaculture production. In a first exploratory research, a number of biodiversity assessments of dikes at the Eastern Scheldt were analysed for the effect of vertical position, roughness and water retention on biodiversity. In this research you will compare two different shapes and different positions in the dyke to assess which one perform better and why. You will be responsible for the whole set-up from the creation of the concrete tiles to the analysis of the results. Research type: Desk and field research; lab analysis with a Malvern; and desk analysis Research level: Water management students and/or Civil engineering students; minor or internship. Prerequisite: interest in morphology and fluid dynamics Customer: Matthijs Boersema, João Paiva Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 ARE ROCKS MORE NATURE FRIENDLY? Currently, dikes and foreshores are designed for flood protection, safety and sustainability. The Building for Nature approach aims at innovating the design of these safety structures, thereby adding nature values. Dikes with this type of additional structures are called rich dikes, or rich revetments. The addition of structures make these dikes more of interest for other use, such as diving, fishing, aquaculture production. In a first exploratory research, a number of biodiversity assessments of dikes at the Eastern Scheldt were analysed for the effect of vertical position, roughness and water retention on biodiversity. In this research you will compare different types of natural materials with a concrete block and different positions in the dyke to assess which one perform better and why. You will be responsible for the whole set-up and the analysis of the results. Research type: field research, lab research Research level: internship or minor Prerequisite: interest in ecology, communication skills, drivers license. Ability to read Dutch; for a minor, at least half of the group should be able to read Dutch. Customer: João Paiva Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 17 February – July 2014
  19. 19. BUILDING FOR NATURE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Nowadays information management is one of the most important activities in society due to the great amount of available information/data which is possible to process by computers and its software. Research face the same problems of society and it is also struggling with information management. For the management of information or data, it is possible to use different software according to the aim, but also it can also vary with the end user or the way you want to manage and show the available information. In the province of Zeeland, Rijkswaterstaat and the Waterboard use GIS for the management of their structures and dikes. Also permits and licenses given to third parties are controlled with the GIS. The HZ aims to fill a database for the Eastern Scheldt, with all the building with nature information available. This database can then be used by professionals of the field or for research purposes related to aquaculture, rich revetments (building for Nature) and artificial reefs (building with living nature), etc. In this assignment you will identify, collect and analyse the appropriate information and help developing a data base and a BwN-GIS application, and/or input for the Delta Wiki. Research type: desk research Research level: bachelor minor or internship Prerequisite: Gis and Access knowledge is required in this assignment Customer: Research Group Building with Nature Contact: João Paiva Period: semester 2, 2012-2013 THE USE OF GIS FOR BIO-GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION ON THE EASTERN SCHELDT Geographical Information Systems can be a powerful tool in the analysis for correlations between habitats and the abiotic factors in their environment. In the province of Zeeland Rijkswaterstaat and the Waterboard use a GIS for the management of their structures and dikes. Also permits and licenses given to third parties are controlled with the GIS. The HZ aims to use the GIS for their research in the relation between biotic and a-biotic parameters. For instance: the impact of natural oyster reefs on sediment dynamics and the effect of physical conditions in the Eastern Scheldt on the presence of rich revetments. Research type: desk research; data mining; desk analysis with GIS or images Research level: Delta management students, Civil Engineering students, Water Management students; minor or internship Prerequisite: practical skills in GIS applications, communication skills, analytical skills Customer: Tjark van Heuvel Period: semester 2, 2013-14 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 18 February – July 2014
  20. 20. ANALYSIS OF TARGET GROUPS WITHIN RIJKSWATERSTAAT As a result of changes in societal demand and technical developments, water management and engineering are moving from hard traditional structures like dikes and dams, to designs in which natural structures and processes are incorporated. This approach is called Building with Nature. Furthermore, this approach also answers the challenge for water managers to create more safety, opportunities for recreation, and other benefits, with increasingly smaller budgets. One of the obstacles to implementation of BwN solutions, is the fact that the approach is not part of mainstream thinking yet. Rijkswaterstaat, the executive body of the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, is responsible for coastal protection projects. At Rijkswaterstaat, the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle for policy implementation is used. Each phase of implementation has its own (and different) dynamics. This project aims at identifying, analyzing and characterizing the different phases of a project and their corresponding responsibility levels, in order to identify the type and depth of knowledge demands required for each level. This will assist the BwN research group in their products - target groups matching. The first step in this analysis is identifying lessons learned from successful BwN cases. Results will also be linked to the digital process structure of dike design and construction that is developed by the research group in cooperation with Rijkswaterstaat and Ecoshape. Research type: desk research and interviews Research level: Delta Management students; minor or internship Prerequisite: ability to read Dutch, interest in Building with Nature approaches, good communication skills, good analytical skills Researcher(s) involved: Carla Pesch Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 Note: similar assignments can be formulated for other target organizations GOVERNANCE AND THE IMPLEMENTATION OF BUILDING WITH NATURE SOLUTIONS Building with Nature solutions purposely combine multiple functions. In this way, they differ from traditional engineering solutions, and this can have important implications for their implementation and management, because Building with Nature solutions cross multiple institutional boundaries. Vegetated foreshores, for instance, combine a contribution to flood risk reduction with a contribution to nature. Traditionally, flood defence is the established domain of actors like water boards and Rijkswaterstaat in the Netherlands. However, vegetated foreshores connecting dikes to wetlands are often managed by other parties such as nature organizations. Including these parties in safety issues requires new institutional arrangements. As the first experiences with BwN solutions become available, the need for, and importance of, designing new appropriate governance arrangements for their implementation is highlighted. Flood protection of the Emanuel polder, located at the Western Scheldt, is based on a clay dike (covered with grass) and a salt marsh in front of it. The dike partition of this polder has failed the safety assessments of 2010, as to its revetment materials. Strengthening the dike can be achieved by increasing the layer of clay. At the same time, the salt marsh in front of the dike (the Schor van Waarde), that has been stabilized by means of two groynes in 2003, needs rejuvenation. This can be achieved by removing the top layer. The materials removed from the salt marsh can be used for strengthening the revetment materials on the dikes. In this assignment, you will analyse the implementation process of Building with Nature applications such as the Oesterdam project and the Noordwaard, and study the successful implementation strategy for Room for the River in the Netherlands (where the position of researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 19 February – July 2014
  21. 21. Rijkswaterstaat as the leading partner in the planning, design and implementation of river works has been broken, and where assigned planning responsibility to local and regional parties). You will identify lessons learned, best practices and critical success factors, and then identify best practices and critical success factors for the case of the Emanuel polder. Research type: desk research, interviews Research level: Delta Management students, minor, internship Prerequisite: ability to read Dutch (in the case of a minor, at least half of the group should be able to read Dutch), interest in Building with Nature approaches, good communications skills, good analytical skills Researcher(s) involved: Carla Pesch Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 FORMULATING A THESAURUS FOR BUILDING WITH NATURE One of the tasks of the research group Building with Nature is to record all expertise and knowledge in the so called Delta Wiki. At this moment the first information is being put in the Wiki and the following years this Wiki will serve as a major information system that stores the results of the experiments and literature studies of all the research groups of the HZ. Part of this will be the development of a glossary or thesaurus that holds the descriptions of the terms that are connected to the research themes. In the semantic web design a definition of a term is called a SKOS (simple knowledge organization structure). The goal of this assignment is to make a list of relevant terms with the description in English and preferably also in Dutch and link them together in a concept map. You will work in close cooperation with the content manager of the Wiki (Paul Vader). Research type: desk research, interviews Research level: Study project Prerequisite: affinity with langange(English, but maybe also Dutch) conceptual thinking, ability to work in a structured way Researcher(s) involved: Paul Vader Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 20 February – July 2014
  22. 22. RESEARCH GROUP WATER TECHNOLOGY Introduction The research group water technology aims at development of applicable technologies for sustainable water (re)use in a combined fresh/saline delta. Current research themes include 1) Recycling of surface and process water for industry, agriculture and aquaculture. Examples are reuse of cooling tower water, rainwater runoff and industrial wastewater. 2) Recovery of valuable content in waste water. Examples are acoustic particle filtering and nutrient recovery. 3) Monitoring and control. Examples are monitoring and control of water filtration systems and control of biofouling in water systems with ultrasound. REMOVAL OR REDUCTION OF HIGHLY CONCENTRATED PESTICIDES FROM GREENHOUSE WASTEWATER Greenhouses have a high water recycling rate, which means that small amounts of minerals and additives tend to accumulate during recycling. At a certain point, water with highly concentrated compound needs to be discharged. One of the accumulated compounds are pesticides used for prevention of plant diseases. These compounds are hard to remove from the water. The aim is to find adequate solutions to pesticide removal from wastewater. Research type: literature study and experiments Research level: bachelor minor Prerequisite: interest in chemistry Customer: Lans, Tuinbouwschap, Waterboard, municipalities Contact: Eva Koper, Niels Groot Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 ENHANCING THE BIODEGRADABILITY OF COOLING TOWER BLOWDOWN USING ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES Reuse of industrial water is becoming increasingly important in order to reduce the water footprint. Cooling tower blowdown is a tough, but interesting source of water, because it is widely available from process industry and power companies. Blowdown contains various persistent, yet organic substances, which can hardly be treated with biological wastewater processes. The aim is to study the effect of using advanced oxidation processes (ozone, peroxide, ultrasound + UV light) on the biodegradability of cooling tower blowdown. Research type: experiments Research level: bachelor minor, internship or graduation (level can easily be adapted) Prerequisite: interest in chemistry and microbiology Customer: Centre of Expertise Delta Technology, DOW Benelux, AWWS Contact: Tessa Steenbakker, Niels Groot Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 21 February – July 2014
  23. 23. ULTRASONIC DISRUPTION OF ALGAE AND ANALYSIS OF RELEASED COMPOUNDS Ultrasonic standing waves can be used to disrupt algal cells. The hypothesis is that either slight cavitation or high static pressures cause this disruption. During disruption the contents of the cells are released in the surrounding water. The aim is to determine the amount of specific compounds being released and their quality with respect to conventional techniques or intact algae. Research type: experiments Research level: bachelor minor, internship or graduation (level can easily be adapted) Prerequisite: interest in physics, (analytical) chemistry and microbiology Customer: Centre of Expertise Biobased (Avans/HZ), Wageningen University Contact: Hans Cappon Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 Note: it might be that part of the analysis will take place at Avans in Breda (1 hour by train). INVENTORY OF NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY FOR RECYCLING Various industrial, aquacultural and food processing treatment steps involve the release of nutrients into (waste)water. The aim is to make an inventory of various nutrients in waste streams available and explore possibilities for reuse. Research type: inventory and experiments Research level: internship Prerequisite: interest in chemistry and biology Customer: Centre of Expertise Delta Technology, Seafarm, LambWeston/Meijer Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 OPERATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ULTRAFILTRATION PROCESSES In 2013 we have installed an ultrafiltration unit in the SEALab, which will be used for onsite water purification. The aim is to determine which parameters are of influence to the filtration process. Flush times, air scouring and filtration run times are parameters to be evaluated on different types of feed water. Research type: experiments Research level: internship Prerequisite: good understanding of physics Customer: HZ Water Technology and Evides Water Company Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 Internships and graduation projects outside HZ PILOT PLANT HARNASCHPOLDER ( DELFT, THE HAGUE), EVIDES & VEOLIA & ROSSMARK In 2009 a pilot plant at the Harnaschpolder WWPT was constructed to explore the possibilities of advanced treatment of WWTP effluent for the suppletion of fresh surface water, aquifer recharge and to provide an alternative source for greenhouse water. Advanced treatment of WWTP effluent is required to reach surface water quality at maximum tolerable risk standard (MTR) level, a guideline for surface water quality of the Dutch government, and to produce greenhouse water. The objective of the pilot research is to demonstrate that surface water and greenhouse water can be produced from WWTP researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 22 February – July 2014
  24. 24. effluent at a reliable and cost effective way. Two treatment lines are available: the reference line which contains conventional technologies and the innovative line which contains new technologies. The objective of the innovative line is to produce water more cost effective compared to the reference line. Contact: Hans Cappon, Sigrid Scherrenberg (TU Delft) DETERMINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS CONDITIONS FOR PRETREATMENT AND NF FOR MILD DESALINATION (DOW, EVIDES, TERNEUZEN) At the production site DECO a pilot will be built for the partial desalination of 3 different water streams: cooling tower blow down, spuikom water (surface water) and effluent from the waste water plant of Dow. The main aim is to reduce the conductivity to 1 mS/cm. The pilot consists of a pre-treatment (coagulation, lamella sedimentation, ultrafiltration) and 2 different desalination techniques: NF (nanofiltration) and EDR (Electro Dialysis Reversal). This internship will focus on the pretreatment by UF and one the desalination techniques, i.e. NF. Aspects considered are the Key Performing Indicators to monitor fouling, specific energy use and water quality. Contact: Wilbert van den Broek (w.vandenbroek@evides.nl) DOW TERNEUZEN BV Inventarization of various water systems with a high sensitivity for contamination with Legionella bacteria. Focus areas are the growth accelerating properties and possibility to select a specific system to define a suitable problem identification and follow-up plan. Contact: Niels Groot (niels.groot@hz.nl) WETSUS Wetsus Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology in Leeuwarden is the largest research centre in the Netherlands. They have many research assignments in various fields from physics to biology and everything in between. Please consult the Wetsus website (www.wetsus.nl) and click on “PhD positions” -> “Graduation and internships” for more information. SHELL NED CHEMIE BV Shell has several assignments on wastewater treatment, aquatic ecology and environmental risk assessment. Please have a look at Infonet for more details. researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 23 February – July 2014
  25. 25. RESEARCH GROUP SAFETY & SPATIAL PLANNING Introduction The research group Safety and Spatial Planning is focusing on the development of Resilient Deltas. Resilience is the capacity of a social system ( e.g. an organization, city, or society) to proactively adapt to and recover from disturbances that are perceived within the system to fail outside the range of normal and expected disturbances. In the resilience programme the research group focuses on four levers which contribute to the resilience of communities in Deltas: Social capital Land use Vital infrastructure Economic drivers The aim of the research is to develop instruments to reduce vulnerability of the Deltas and to improve adaptability of the Delta communities. The focus of these instruments is not only to enhance the ability of communities to cope with crises situations, but also to contribute to the vitality of Delta communities in everyday life. Current research themes include: Develop a resilience strategy for communities in the Southwestern Delta Develop a monitor to measure resilience in communities (i.c.w. Louisiana State University) Develop a master analysis tool based on the theory of complex systems Validate the four levers in a distinguished geographical environment by using action research like design studio meetings Develop a plan for redeveloping certain areas in the ‘Waterpoort” area RESILIENT DELTAS PROJECT 2013-2014 (RAAK PROJECT) This project focuses on developing strategic and management tools to establish resilience as a strategic focal point for Delta Developments in the Southwestern Delta. In this project we develop and validate resilience tools using action research and monitoring instruments. Louisana State University (LSU) has developed a Resilience Inference Model (RIM) to instrumentalize Delta developments. LSU has been invited to use this model to create a Dutch model based on indicators and data from the Netherlands. Action research is conducted within communities of the Southwestern Delta via design studios with professionals and citizens. The overall objective for participating students is to gain a more profound understanding of the four levers and their relation with resilience. The students will contribute to the overall objective via literature study and field research, resulting in empirical indicators of the four levers of resilient communities. Another part of the assignments is to assist the researchers of LSU with the collection of statistical data about the Southwestern Delta. researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 24 February – July 2014
  26. 26. Assignments: 4 assignments for research minor / internship Students: Students of Delta Management, Water Management, Social Sciences, Economy, and students from abroad Research type: literature study, field research (observations, interviews) and desk research Research level: bachelor minor/ internship Prerequisite: good analytical skills; specific interest in social sciences, water safety, economics and/or land use planning Customer: RWS, Safety region, municipalities Contact: Dick Fundter Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 WATERPOORT 2014 (CENTRE OF EXPERTISE PROJECT) The HZ Delta Academy participates together with NHTV and Avans University of Applied Sciences in the Waterpoort program. Waterpoort is an area development programme initiated by the province of Brabant to create new opportunities in the mainly rural area around the Volkerak. In this area redevelopment process, involved governments, businesses, ngo’s and citizens try to find new roles in water related area development. The involved organizations try to stimulate and facilitate citizens and local businesses to innovate, to restore connectivity with the water and to co-create an identity and future of the area. The contribution of the involved Universities of Applied Sciences is to support local initiatives with nd knowledge and skills. The activities in the 2 semester in 2013-2014 area focuses on an exploration of the problems and potentials of the area, resulting in an ‘Atlas of Waterpoort’. Also the identification of potential projects for the development of Waterpoort is part of the assignment. The research will be conducted in combined teams from the three involved educational institutions. Positions are available for 2 students from HZ University of Applied Sciences. Assignments: research minor/ internship about experiments in area redevelopment using principles of resilience (2 students) Students: Students of Delta Management, Water Management, Civil Engineering (Delta Academy), Scaldis Academy Research type: literature study, interviews, field research Research level: bachelor minor/ internship Prerequisite: Good communication and writing skills. Interest in social sciences, water safety, economics and land use planning Customer: Waterpoort (joint programme of 3 provinces, 9 Municipalities and several other organizations) Contact: Jonas Papenborg Period: semester 2, 2013-2014 researchportfolios1_2013_2014 Research Portfolio of the DA-Applied Research Centre 25 February – July 2014

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