VISION AND STRATEGY BUILDING
IN AREA DEVELOPMENT
LILIANE GEERLINGSEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
Alice: Which way should I go?
Cheshire cat: That depends on where you are
going
Alice: I don’t know where I’m going
Cheshi...
VISION
Or….the dream
Your vision communicates what your organization
believes are the ideal conditions for your
community ...
VISION STATEMENT
As an example, the vision for Ho Chi Minh City:
“To develop HCMC into a modern industrial city
in 2025 in...
VISION STATEMENT
As an example, the vision for Amsterdam:
“Amsterdam develops further as a core city of
an internationally...
VISION STATEMENT
As an example, the (water)vision for Rotterdam:
“Water is an opportunity to make Rotterdam a
safe, livabl...
VISION STATEMENT
By developing a vision statement, your
organization makes the beliefs and governing
principles of your or...
VISION STATEMENT
In general, vision statements should be:
• Understood and shared by members of the
community;
• Broad eno...
MISSION
The what and why
Developing mission statements are the next step
in the action planning process.
An organization's...
MISSION
“Our mission: to inspire and nurture the human
spirit – one person, one cup and one
neighborhood at a time.”
SEPTE...
MISSION
The mission might refer to a problem, such as
inadequate housing, or a goal, such as providing
clean drinking wate...
MISSION
HZ University of Applied Sciences is a knowledge
institute with a strong regional anchoring and a
worldwide orient...
MISSION
Mission statements should be:
• Concise
• Outcome-oriented
• Inclusive
SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
OBJECTIVES
Once an organization has developed its mission
statement, its next step is to develop the specific
objectives t...
OBJECTIVES
For example, one of several objectives for a
community initiative to promote care and caring
for older adults m...
OBJECTIVES
EXAMPLE
“The city will offer its citizens a safe, healthy and
pleasant environment in which to live and work.
S...
OBJECTIVES
EXAMPLE
“…Becoming a healthier, pleasant and safe city
also has an economic pay-off: the city becomes
more attr...
OBJECTIVES
There are three basic types of objectives:
Behavioral objectives
These objectives look at changing the behavior...
OBJECTIVES
Community-level outcome objectives:
These are related to behavioral outcome
objectives, but are more focused on...
OBJECTIVES
Process objectives
These are the objectives that refer to the
implementation of activities necessary to achieve...
VISION
SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
STRATEGIES
The how
Strategies explain how the initiative will reach its
objectives. Generally, organizations will have a
w...
STRATEGIES
Five types of specific strategies can help guide
most interventions. They are:
• Providing information and enha...
STRATEGIES
• Modify access, barriers, and opportunities
(such as offering scholarships to students who
would be otherwise ...
ACTION PLAN
What change will happen; who will do what by
when to make it happen
An action plan describes in great detail e...
ACTION PLAN
For example, in a program whose mission is to
increase youth interest in politics, one of the
strategies might...
ACTION PLAN
Action steps are developed for each component
of the intervention or changes to be sought.
These include:
• Ac...
URBAN / REGIONAL PLANNING
Urban & Regional Planning moved away from
comprehensive master plans, controlling the
spatial de...
STRATEGIC PLANNING
Strategic planning includes economic,
environmental and social dimensions alongside
the physical and sp...
STRATEGIC PLANNING
Urban planners need to become urban managers
who can formulate strategic spatial plans which
are feasib...
WHY A VISION & STRATEGY
• It encourages stakeholders to invest and
behave according to a vision, effectively pulling
in on...
WHY A VISION & STRATEGY
• It enables a city/region to anticipate the rate,
type, and physical direction of growth and to
d...
WHY A VISION & STRATEGY
• Strategic planning creates a framework for
competitive advantage through thorough
analysis of th...
WHY A VISION & STRATEGY
• Strategic planning is a qualitative, idea-driven process.
It integrates “soft” data that are not...
STRATEGY
STRATEGIC
DIRECTIONS
STRATEGIC
INTERVENTIONS
& ACTIONS
SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
PLANNING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE
A major challenge when planning for climate
change is to deal with uncertainties.
The pace and...
AN ADAPTIVE STRATEGY
• links short-term actions and long-term
developments and includes ways to deal with
uncertainties;
•...
AN ADAPTIVE STRATEGY
• connects to or incorporates ongoing
developments and plans to create synergy and
connect to various...
systems
people places
social
structures
RESILIENCE ISN’T JUST ABOUT
INFRASTRUCTURE
SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
behavior
& values
n...
DESIGN FOR DELTA AREAS
Delta areas show extreme difficulties in finding a
balance among different claims and interests,
su...
DESIGN FOR DELTA AREAS
In deltas this tension between urbanisation and
the natural environment is present in an
extreme wa...
How can a balance of economy, urbanisation,
environmental quality and safety be made in
delta areas?
How can fruitful inte...
How can we define a new balance between
planned, designed and engineered
interventions in the system
of the delta on the o...
DESIGN FOR DELTA AREAS
How do all the suitable elements form an
integrated regional strategy?
How can the intervention are...
Forecasting is ‘ [..] to estimate the consequences
of current developments and our own
intervention on long-term effects.’...
FORECASTING: USE OF SCENARIOS
Different scenarios for the Guadelete region towards
2050 -> different spatial impacts
SEPTE...
Backtracking is basing solutions ‘on historical
circumstances at the time there still was a
sustainable equilibrium.’
SEPT...
Backcasting is ‘involving the description of a
desired future state [...] and translating this
state back to strategies an...
EXAMPLE:
ROTTERDAM WATERCITY
SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
240.000 m3
1. Research; facts and figures on water
Extra storage capacity for water needed before 2050 in
city centre and ...
Rotterdam followed an adaptive strategy and can adapt
to climate change and sealevel rise.
In 2300 Rotterdam stays an attr...
Groeten uit Rotterdam
The assignment: 1+1=3
To use the waterproblems as a chance for a better city.
The singelplan after 150 years
Discovery 1: Rotterdam watercity?
The current mental map of the urban water is very
fragmented.
The water should be more v...
Discovery 2: dealing with uncertainties
Whether the sealevel will rise 60 cm or 6 meters Rotterdam stays
an attractive por...
Discovery 3:
the river as development area
Discovery 4: The north and south of
Rotterdam are hydrologically very different
• Differences in morphological surface:
no...
Discovery 5:
The city needs a pair of kidneys
TRADITIONAL APPROACH
Safetyproblems
Not enough storage capacity
Waterquality
Water = thread
INNOVATIVE APPROACH
Water = opportunity
for an attractive city!
Safetyproblems
Not enough storage capacity
Waterquality
Ur...
Rivercity
Singelcity and ‘sponge’
Canalcity
watersolutions + good housing + public space
VISION ROTTERDAM WATERCITY 2035
ROTTERDAM WATERCITY
- Rotterdam is the most important port city of
Europe in knowledge and innovations
- Rotterdam builds ...
VISION FOR GUADELETE
REGION:
FOR EXAMPLE
“In 2025 the Guadelete region is water sensitive
and an attractive place to work,...
TO DEVELOP A STRATEGY FOR
GUADELETE REGION
To become a water sensitive region requires:
- socio-technical changes
- techno...
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Lecture strategy and vision in area development

  1. 1. VISION AND STRATEGY BUILDING IN AREA DEVELOPMENT LILIANE GEERLINGSEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  2. 2. Alice: Which way should I go? Cheshire cat: That depends on where you are going Alice: I don’t know where I’m going Cheshire cat: Then it doesn’t matter which way you go! SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  3. 3. VISION Or….the dream Your vision communicates what your organization believes are the ideal conditions for your community – how things would look if the issues important to you were perfectly addressed. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  4. 4. VISION STATEMENT As an example, the vision for Ho Chi Minh City: “To develop HCMC into a modern industrial city in 2025 in which fast economic development is connected with sustainable development so that social progress and fairness are realised whilst protecting the environment. “ Climate Adaptation Strategy Ho Chi Minh City SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  5. 5. VISION STATEMENT As an example, the vision for Amsterdam: “Amsterdam develops further as a core city of an internationally competitive, sustainable European metropolis.“ Structuurvisie Amsterdam 2040 SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  6. 6. VISION STATEMENT As an example, the (water)vision for Rotterdam: “Water is an opportunity to make Rotterdam a safe, livable and economically strong city.“ Waterplan 2 SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  7. 7. VISION STATEMENT By developing a vision statement, your organization makes the beliefs and governing principles of your organization clear to the greater community (as well as to your own staff, participants, and volunteers). SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  8. 8. VISION STATEMENT In general, vision statements should be: • Understood and shared by members of the community; • Broad enough to encompass a variety of local perspectives; • Inspiring and uplifting to everyone involved in your effort; • Easy to communicate. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  9. 9. MISSION The what and why Developing mission statements are the next step in the action planning process. An organization's mission statement describes what the group is going to do, and why it's going to do that. Mission statements are similar to vision statements, but they're more concrete, and they are definitely more "action-oriented" than vision statements. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  10. 10. MISSION “Our mission: to inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.” SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  11. 11. MISSION The mission might refer to a problem, such as inadequate housing, or a goal, such as providing clean drinking water for everyone. The mission can hint - very broadly - at how the organization might go about fixing the problems it has noted. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  12. 12. MISSION HZ University of Applied Sciences is a knowledge institute with a strong regional anchoring and a worldwide orientation. It specifically wants to position itself within the durability, water, safety, innovation & enterprise knowledge domains. The various target groups can master their chosen competencies via custom made education, for a lifelong career in a multicultural and multiform society. HZ wants to be a partner to companies, institutes and authorities, in order to look after their knowledge and innovation need. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  13. 13. MISSION Mission statements should be: • Concise • Outcome-oriented • Inclusive SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  14. 14. OBJECTIVES Once an organization has developed its mission statement, its next step is to develop the specific objectives that are focused on achieving that mission. Objectives refer to specific measurable results for the initiative's broad goals. An organization's objectives generally lay out how much of what will be accomplished by when. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  15. 15. OBJECTIVES For example, one of several objectives for a community initiative to promote care and caring for older adults might be: "By 2015 (by when), to increase by 20% (how much) those elders reporting that they are in daily contact with someone who cares about them (of what)." SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  16. 16. OBJECTIVES EXAMPLE “The city will offer its citizens a safe, healthy and pleasant environment in which to live and work. Safe meaning, amongst others, that the city is safe from catastrophic floods. Healthy meaning that the levels of air, water and soil pollution are controlled and reduced to internationally accepted norms for human health. … SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  17. 17. OBJECTIVES EXAMPLE “…Becoming a healthier, pleasant and safe city also has an economic pay-off: the city becomes more attractive, not only for tourists but also for international service oriented companies that want to provide their highly skilled employees with a pleasant living and working environment.” Climate Adaptation Strategy Ho Chi Minh City SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  18. 18. OBJECTIVES There are three basic types of objectives: Behavioral objectives These objectives look at changing the behaviors of people (what they are doing and saying) and the products (or results) of their behaviors. For example, a neighborhood improvement group might develop an objective around having an increased amount of home repair taking place (the behavior) or of improved housing (the result). SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  19. 19. OBJECTIVES Community-level outcome objectives: These are related to behavioral outcome objectives, but are more focused on a community level instead of an individual level. For example, the same group might suggest increasing the percentage of decent affordable housing in the community as a community-level outcome objective. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  20. 20. OBJECTIVES Process objectives These are the objectives that refer to the implementation of activities necessary to achieve other objectives. For example, the group might adopt a comprehensive plan for improving neighborhood housing. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  21. 21. VISION SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  22. 22. STRATEGIES The how Strategies explain how the initiative will reach its objectives. Generally, organizations will have a wide variety of strategies that include people from all of the different parts, or sectors, of the community. These strategies range from the very broad, which encompass people and resources from many different parts of the community, to the very specific, which aim at carefully defined areas. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  23. 23. STRATEGIES Five types of specific strategies can help guide most interventions. They are: • Providing information and enhancing skills (e.g., offer skills training in conflict management) • Enhancing services and support (e.g., start a mentoring programs for high-risk youth) SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  24. 24. STRATEGIES • Modify access, barriers, and opportunities (such as offering scholarships to students who would be otherwise unable to attend college) • Change the consequences of efforts (e.g., provide incentives for community members to volunteer) • Modify policies (e.g., change business policies to allow parents and guardians and volunteers to spend more time with young children). SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  25. 25. ACTION PLAN What change will happen; who will do what by when to make it happen An action plan describes in great detail exactly how strategies will be implemented to accomplish the objectives developed earlier in the process. The plan refers to: specific changes to be sought, and the specific action steps necessary to bring about changes in all of the relevant sectors, or parts, of the community. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  26. 26. ACTION PLAN For example, in a program whose mission is to increase youth interest in politics, one of the strategies might be to teach students about the electoral system. Some of the action steps, then, might be to develop age-appropriate materials for students, to hold mock elections for candidates in local schools, and to include some teaching time in the curriculum. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  27. 27. ACTION PLAN Action steps are developed for each component of the intervention or changes to be sought. These include: • Action step(s): What will happen • Person(s) responsible: Who will do what • Date to be completed: Timing of each action step • Resources required: Resources and support (both what is needed and what's available ) • Barriers or resistance, and a plan to overcome them! • Collaborators: Who else should know about this action SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  28. 28. URBAN / REGIONAL PLANNING Urban & Regional Planning moved away from comprehensive master plans, controlling the spatial development of the entire territory to more flexible strategic plans and visions. Urban planners must be able to translate strategies and visions into a range of concrete action plans. . SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  29. 29. STRATEGIC PLANNING Strategic planning includes economic, environmental and social dimensions alongside the physical and spatial dimensions of planning. It is focused on creating synergies and aims to build on the potential of existing initiatives and ongoing activities and development in cities. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  30. 30. STRATEGIC PLANNING Urban planners need to become urban managers who can formulate strategic spatial plans which are feasible to be implemented even in the challenging circumstances of today such as rapidly growing cities with informal housing, social deprivation and economic decline and changing climatic circumstances. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  31. 31. WHY A VISION & STRATEGY • It encourages stakeholders to invest and behave according to a vision, effectively pulling in one direction (getting priorities right is crucial to success); • It (cost-effectively) allocates resources to a few key strategic areas; • It helps a city anticipate future shocks and rapidly changing contexts (the risk environment) and raises its understanding of how stakeholders would respond under various scenarios; SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  32. 32. WHY A VISION & STRATEGY • It enables a city/region to anticipate the rate, type, and physical direction of growth and to develop infrastructure ahead of growth. • Strategic planning is flexible and oriented towards the larger picture. It aligns the city/region with its environment, setting a context for meeting goals and providing a framework and direction to achieve the desired future. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  33. 33. WHY A VISION & STRATEGY • Strategic planning creates a framework for competitive advantage through thorough analysis of the city/region, its internal and external environment, and its potential. This enables cities/regions to respond to the emerging trends, events, challenges, and opportunities within the framework of the vision and mission they have developed through the strategic planning process. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  34. 34. WHY A VISION & STRATEGY • Strategic planning is a qualitative, idea-driven process. It integrates “soft” data that are not always supported quantitatively, such as experiences, intuition and ideas, and involves stakeholders in the on-going dialogue with the aim of providing a clear vision and focus for the city/region. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  35. 35. STRATEGY STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS STRATEGIC INTERVENTIONS & ACTIONS SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  36. 36. PLANNING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE A major challenge when planning for climate change is to deal with uncertainties. The pace and magnitude of climate change and the future socio-economic development of a region cannot be predicted accurately. Uncertainties do not have to cause delay in decision making. To deal with uncertainties, one can develop an adaptive strategy. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  37. 37. AN ADAPTIVE STRATEGY • links short-term actions and long-term developments and includes ways to deal with uncertainties; • is flexible and uses a stepwise approach in order to take cost effective corrective actions depending on the future speed of climate change and urban development; • is based on an integrated approach, using sectoral synergism to increase the attractiveness of an area. It contributes to the socio-economic development ambitions of a region and takes the potentials and constraints of area development into account;
  38. 38. AN ADAPTIVE STRATEGY • connects to or incorporates ongoing developments and plans to create synergy and connect to various investment schemes; • uses the adaptive capacity of economic sectors to incorporate adaptive developments or systems through policy measures; • applies the technique of the adaptation pathways to analyse possible sequences of measures.
  39. 39. systems people places social structures RESILIENCE ISN’T JUST ABOUT INFRASTRUCTURE SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013 behavior & values natural& manmade urban & rural interaction& dependency
  40. 40. DESIGN FOR DELTA AREAS Delta areas show extreme difficulties in finding a balance among different claims and interests, such as on-going urbanisation, port-development, agriculture, environmental and ecological qualities, flood-defence systems and fresh-water supply. Balancing competing claims in deltas requires new relationships to be forged between design, engineering, science and governance. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  41. 41. DESIGN FOR DELTA AREAS In deltas this tension between urbanisation and the natural environment is present in an extreme way. Thus, urban planning and design in delta areas is forced to integrate many factors more comprehensively through multi and interdisciplinary design and planning approaches. SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  42. 42. How can a balance of economy, urbanisation, environmental quality and safety be made in delta areas? How can fruitful interdisciplinary approaches of design, engineering, science and governance be created and maintained? DESIGN FOR DELTA AREAS SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  43. 43. How can we define a new balance between planned, designed and engineered interventions in the system of the delta on the one hand, and a freedom for self-organization of natural and societal processes on the other? DESIGN FOR DELTA AREAS SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  44. 44. DESIGN FOR DELTA AREAS How do all the suitable elements form an integrated regional strategy? How can the intervention areas be spatially integrated on a local scale? What are the effects of the local interventions on the regional scale? What are the generic qualities of the regional strategy and the local interventions? SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  45. 45. Forecasting is ‘ [..] to estimate the consequences of current developments and our own intervention on long-term effects.’ SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013 FORECASTING
  46. 46. FORECASTING: USE OF SCENARIOS Different scenarios for the Guadelete region towards 2050 -> different spatial impacts SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  47. 47. Backtracking is basing solutions ‘on historical circumstances at the time there still was a sustainable equilibrium.’ SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013 BACKTRACKING
  48. 48. Backcasting is ‘involving the description of a desired future state [...] and translating this state back to strategies and measures we need to develop now.’ SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013 BACKCASTING
  49. 49. EXAMPLE: ROTTERDAM WATERCITY SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  50. 50. 240.000 m3 1. Research; facts and figures on water Extra storage capacity for water needed before 2050 in city centre and “old city neigbourhoods”
  51. 51. Rotterdam followed an adaptive strategy and can adapt to climate change and sealevel rise. In 2300 Rotterdam stays an attractive and strategic city WORST CASE SCENARIO: + 6 M
  52. 52. Groeten uit Rotterdam
  53. 53. The assignment: 1+1=3 To use the waterproblems as a chance for a better city.
  54. 54. The singelplan after 150 years
  55. 55. Discovery 1: Rotterdam watercity? The current mental map of the urban water is very fragmented. The water should be more visible and useful.
  56. 56. Discovery 2: dealing with uncertainties Whether the sealevel will rise 60 cm or 6 meters Rotterdam stays an attractive port city. De area with the main sea dikes will be transformed in a dynamic development zone.
  57. 57. Discovery 3: the river as development area
  58. 58. Discovery 4: The north and south of Rotterdam are hydrologically very different • Differences in morphological surface: north=peat, south = clay • Differences in watersystem: a ‘boezem’system in the north and a closed watersystem at one level in the south • Differences in urban lay-out
  59. 59. Discovery 5: The city needs a pair of kidneys
  60. 60. TRADITIONAL APPROACH Safetyproblems Not enough storage capacity Waterquality Water = thread
  61. 61. INNOVATIVE APPROACH Water = opportunity for an attractive city! Safetyproblems Not enough storage capacity Waterquality Urban challenges (
  62. 62. Rivercity Singelcity and ‘sponge’ Canalcity watersolutions + good housing + public space VISION ROTTERDAM WATERCITY 2035
  63. 63. ROTTERDAM WATERCITY - Rotterdam is the most important port city of Europe in knowledge and innovations - Rotterdam builds in existing urban area - Rotterdam focuses on public space and water assignment as accelerator of spatial developments - Rotterdam treasures its accessability in a sustainable way - Rotterdam combines the approach of environment and spatial development in a creative way - Rotterdam puts cultural heritage and architecture forward as a force of development SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013
  64. 64. VISION FOR GUADELETE REGION: FOR EXAMPLE “In 2025 the Guadelete region is water sensitive and an attractive place to work, live and recreate.“ ……………………. ……………………….
  65. 65. TO DEVELOP A STRATEGY FOR GUADELETE REGION To become a water sensitive region requires: - socio-technical changes - technologies, infrastructure and urban form are diverse and flexible, continually evolving - normative values are related to the environment, health, liveability (a.o.) SEPTEMBER 23RD 2013

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