Lecture fsw 2013 short version stakeholders and participation

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  • Support: draagvlak
  • Lecture fsw 2013 short version stakeholders and participation

    1. 1. Stakeholders and Participation River Basin Management & IP Field Study Days 2013-14
    2. 2. Reasons for stakeholder participation? QUALITY INSTRUMENT DEMOCRACY ADVANTAGES • KNOWLEDGE • FINANCING • MANPOWER • INITIATIVES ADVANTAGES • UNDERSTANDING • COOPERATION • CREATIVITY • COMMITMENT ADVANTAGES • TRANSPARANCY • MOBILIZING • NO NIMBY PRACTICAL REASONS e.g. knowledge of the environment PRAGMATIC REASONS e.g. support PRINCIPLES, e.g. democratic rights Adapted from: Breman, B. et al, Participatie in het Waterbeheer, Alterra, Wageningen, 2008
    3. 3. Key elements of IWRM • Coordinated process, brings stakeholders together • Focuses both on economic and social wellfare and equity AND protecting ecosystems • Uses scientific data & tools to provide a sound base for judgement • Proper governance; involving participation
    4. 4. Participation in the WFD
    5. 5. Stakeholder • An interested individual, group or institution that may be affected by decisions or actions pertaining to a specific resource and may be part of decision- making about the resource Participation • a process in which stakeholder and public concerns, views and values are incorporated into decision-making (and implementation) of water resource management • Not a single event; co- management of a resource necessitates ongoing commitment.
    6. 6. Adapted from: Breman, B. et al, Participatie in het Waterbeheer, Alterra, Wageningen, 2008 TOP – DOWN APPROACH PARTICIPATIVE APPROACH DECISION DECISION Problems identification and planning Problems identification and planning Implementation Implementation End of project End of project Start of project Start of project
    7. 7. and interest STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS
    8. 8. A. Stakeholder identification • Who are the potential beneficiaries? • Who might be adversely affected? • Have vulnerable groups who may be impacted been indentified? Categorization • Water users • Governmental institutions • Civil society and NGO’s
    9. 9. B. Power – Interest Grid
    10. 10. C. Drawing out Assumptions and Risks, e.g. • It must be made clear how different groups are represented; how these representatives are selected • Expectations should be managed, e.g. UK involvement of amateur naturalist in BAP • Not all stakeholders want to be involved and they may have very different reasons for participating.
    11. 11. Expectations: participation of amateur naturalists in the Biodiversity Action Planning (UK) From: Towards succesful participation in European biodiversity and water governance – policy brief, GoverNat 2010
    12. 12. D. Levels of participation • Delegated power: stakeholder has dominant decision-making power • Partnership: joint setting of agenda and agreement on the process; participatory decision-making • Consultation: informing and consulting; perhaps responding to plans and proposals • Information: providing information
    13. 13. Step D: Stakeholder communication worksheet • http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/worksheets/StakeholderCommunicationsWorkshe et.pdf
    14. 14. Factors for successful participation 1. Managing expectations 2. Adapting to context 3. Interacting with multiple actors 4. Involving bottom-up initiatives 5. Recognizing and sharing benefits and costs From: Towards succesful participation in European biodiversity and water governance – policy brief, GoverNat 2010
    15. 15. Adapting to context: Alqueva multipurpose water project From: Towards succesful participation in European biodiversity and water governance – policy brief, GoverNat 2010
    16. 16. Interacting with multiple actors agro-environmental project in Lleida source: Towards succesful participation in European biodiversity and water governance – policy brief, GoverNat 2010
    17. 17. Bottom-up initiatives: bird lake in Lempälää, Finland Source: Towards succesful participation in European biodiversity and water governance – policy brief, GoverNat 2010
    18. 18. Recognizing and sharing benefits and costs. Sado Estuary, Portugal Protected species: Otters Economic activity: Fish farmers Source: Towards succesful participation in European biodiversity and water governance – policy brief, GoverNat 2010
    19. 19. Lessons learnt from earlier projects • Stakeholder participation, especially in its earlier stages, needs a lot of resources • Without lobying, women’s representation in the stakeholders fora becomes low • Large stakeholders dominate and set the agenda • The needs for rural small-scale stakeholders are not considered in large scale river basin management
    20. 20. Other Challenges to Participation • Representation • Accountability • Role of experts • Scale • Time-frame • Jurisdictional issues From: Perkins, P.E., Public participation in watershed management: international practices for inclusivenetss, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth 36 p.204-212, 2011

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