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A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar
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A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar

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A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar

A study on perfoemance management of mahindra and mahindra in bidar

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  • 1. Management thesis. A THESIS ON “A STUDY ON PERFOEMANCE MANAGEMENT OF MAHINDRA AND MAHINDRA IN BIDAR” Submitted by: MAHANANDA BABURAO Enrl No 7NBBD002 INC, Bidar Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 1
  • 2. Management thesis. A THESIS ON “A STUDY ON PERFOEMANCE MANAGEMENT OF MAHINDRA AND MAHINDRA IN BIDAR” Submitted by: MAHANANDA BABURAO Enrl No.7NBBD002 MBA III SEM INC, Bidar A report submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of THE MBA PROGRAM (The class of 2009) INC ICFAI National College CERTIFICATE Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 2
  • 3. Management thesis. This is to certify that Management thesis – I titled “a study on performance management of Mahindra and Mahindra in Bidar” Submitted by Miss. Mahananda.B, Enrollment no: 7NBBD002 during semester – III of the PG Program (The Class of 2009) embodies original work done by her. Signature of Faculty Supervisor Name : Mr. Donald Johansson Designation : Faculty member (Soft Skill) Campus : INC, Bidar CERTIFICATE Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 3
  • 4. Management thesis. This is to certify that Management thesis – I titled “a study on performance management of Mahindra and Mahindra in bidar” Submitted by Miss. Mahananda.B, enrollment No. 7NBBD002during semester – III of the PG Program (Class of 2009) embodies original work done by her. Signature of Center Head Name : PROF. DONALD JHONSON Designation : Centre Head Centre : INC, Bidar ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 4
  • 5. Management thesis. It has been a great privilege to carry out the project work “A STUDY ON PERFOEMANCE MANAGEMENT OF MAHINDRA AND MAHINDRA IN BIDAR” I want to avail this opportunity to express sincere thanks to Mr. Donald Jonson Principal, ICFAI national College, Bidar. I would also like to thank Mr. (Company Guide), Mahindra and Mahindra Prudential, Prof. Donald Johnson (Faculty Guide), ICFAI national College, BIDAR for giving me an opportunity and valuable advice and guidance in this project. MAHANANDA.B Enroll No. 7NBBD002 Title and Synopsis Approval Form The MBA Program (The Class of 2009) Part – A INC Campus I N C B I D A R Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 5
  • 6. Management thesis. Enrollment No. 7 N B B D 0 0 2 Name of the Student MAHANANDA.B Semester III Semester IV 1. CONSUMER 5. SERVICE BEHAVIOUR MARKETING 2. RETAIL MANAGEMENT 6. SALES AND DISTRIBUTION 3. PERFORMANCE MAEASUREMENT AND 7. STRATEGIC HRM Electives PEWARD SYSTEMS 8. LEADERSHIP 4. CORPRATE SKILLS AND CUMMUNICATION CHANGE MANAGEMENT SIP Details Sector: Print media. “Outlook publishing” SIP Title: To generate business of Rs. 75000 for four months. Product / Function: Magazine. Name of the Faculty Prof. Donald Johnson Supervisor Functional Area Marketing Rationale for Proposed Research Project (min 500 words) – (Enclose Separate sheets): The student should write about the relevance of the topic in current business environment, placement opportunities based on the topic under study, its relation to the electives chosen by the student, etc Part B Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 6
  • 7. Management thesis. “A STUDY ON PERFOEMANCE Title of Management MANAGEMENT OF MAHINDRA AND Thesis MAHINDRA IN BIDAR” Functional Area Human Resources Management 1. Synopsis of the Management Thesis (1500 words) – (Enclose Separate Sheets): The synopsis of the Management Thesis should provide an introduction giving an overview of the topic and its importance, problem definition stating the objectives and scope of work, proposed methodology for achieving the objectives of the research project, probable sources of literature review, sampling plan, etc. 2. Weekly plan for implementation of Management Thesis includes literature survey, research methods, design of questionnaire, sampling plan, collection of data, analysis of data, tabulation, research findings, conclusion, etc. (Enclose Separate Sheets) Date: Signature of the Student (For Office Use Only) Review by Faculty Supervisor (Detailed comments of Faculty Supervisor on the synopsis and the title are documented here.) (Enclose separate sheets if necessary) Faculty Supervisor Campus Head Date: Date: Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 7
  • 8. Management thesis. Appendix B (Certificate from Faculty Supervisor) CERTIFICATE This is to certify that the Management Thesis titled “A STUDY ON PERFOEMANCE MANAGEMENT OF MAHINDRA AND MAHINDRA IN BIDAR” submitted by Mahananda.B Enroll No: 7NBBD002 during Semester III of the MBA Program (The Class of 2009) embodies original work done by him/her. Signature of the Faculty Supervisor Name : Prof. DONALD JOHNSON Designation : Coordinator Campus : INC Bidar Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 8
  • 9. Management thesis. TABLE OF CONTENTS: Page no. Acknowledgement vii List of tables and Graphs 11 Summary:- Questionnaire 12 1)Introduction 13 1.1Need of the study 42 1.2 Objectives 43 2) Profile 2.1Company profile 47 3)Analysis 3.1 Research design (Analysis) 52 3.2 Findings 71 3.3 Suggestions 72 3.4 Conclusions 73 4)Bibliography 74 5)Annexure:- 75 Annexure 1 Annexure 2 Annexure 3 Annexure 4 List of table and graphs:- Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 9
  • 10. Management thesis. Five tables and one graph is used. 1. HR: Human Resources, or Humane Resources 2. 360 Degree Feedback. 3. 360 DELEGATIONS. 4. Score for the behavior (graph). Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 10
  • 11. Management thesis. Summary:- Topic of the management thesis: “A STUDY ON PERFOEMANCE MANAGEMENT OF MAHINDRA AND MAHINDRA IN BIDAR” The management thesis focuses on Human resource study on performance management with reference to Mahindra and Mahindra. In the management thesis the information on the performance management is collected. The information about this is collected by the Show room which is located in Bidar as well as by the internet also. I prepared a questionnaire to collect information from them. The main aim of the questionnaire is to collect the information of theory is practiced in practical or not. The questionnaire also helped me collect the information. It helped me to understand whether the employees are aware of the performance management or not. I study that Successful organizations are embracing a new model of corporate performance management (CPM) – one that relies heavily on understanding data to improve future performance. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 11
  • 12. Management thesis. CHAPTER-1 INTRODUCTION: What is performance management? In their definitive text upon which this factsheet is based, Armstrong and Baron define performance management as 'a process which contributes to the effective management of individuals and teams in order to achieve high levels of organizational performance. As such, it establishes shared understanding about what is to be achieved and an approach to leading and developing people which will ensure that it is achieved'. They go on to stress that it is 'a strategy which relates to every activity of the organization set in the context of its human resource policies, culture, style and communications systems. The nature of the strategy depends on the organizational context and can vary from organization to organization.' In other words performance management should be: • Strategic - it is about broader issues and longer-term goals. • Integrated - it should link various aspects of the business, people management, and individuals and teams. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 12
  • 13. Management thesis. It should incorporate: • Performance improvement - throughout the organization, for individual, team and organizational effectiveness. • Development - unless there is continuous development of individuals and teams, performance will not improve. • Managing behavior - ensuring that individuals are encouraged to behave in a way that allows and fosters better working relationships. Armstrong and Baron Stress that at its best performance management is a tool to ensure that managers manage effectively; that they ensure the people or team they manage: • know and understand what is expected of them • have the skills and ability to deliver on these expectations • are supported by the organization to develop the capacity to meet these expectations are given feedback on their performance • Have the opportunity to discuss and contribute to individual and team aims and objectives. It is also about ensuring that managers themselves are aware of the impact of their own behavior on the people they manage and are encouraged to identify and exhibit positive behaviors. So performance management is about establishing a culture in which individuals and groups take responsibility for the continuous improvement of business processes and of their own skills, behavior and contributions. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 13
  • 14. Management thesis. It is about sharing expectations. Managers can clarify what they expect individual and teams to do; likewise individuals and teams can communicate their expectations of how they should be managed and what they need to do their jobs. It follows that performance management is about interrelationships and about improving the quality of relationships - between managers and individuals, between managers and teams, between members of teams and so on, and is therefore a joint process. It is also about planning - defining expectations expressed as objectives and in business plans - and about measurement; the old dictum is 'If you can't measure it, you can't manage it'. It should apply to all employees, not just managers, and to teams as much as individuals. It is a continuous process, not a one-off event. Last but not least, it is holistic and should pervade every aspect of running an organization. How does performance management work? Because performance management is (or should be) so all- pervasive, it needs structures to support it. These should provide a framework to help people operate, and to help them to help others to operate. But it should not be a rigid system; there needs to be a reasonable degree of flexibility to allow people freedom to operate. Performance management is a process, not an event. It operates as a continuous cycle. Corporate strategic goals provide the starting point for business and departmental goals, followed by agreement on performance and development, leading to the drawing up of plans between individuals and managers, with continuous monitoring and feedback supported by formal reviews. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 14
  • 15. Management thesis. TOOLS OF PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT:- It is impossible to go into details of each of the tools used by performance management, so the following paragraphs simply provide an outline. 1. Performance and development reviews Many organizations without performance management systems operate 'appraisals' in which an individual's manager regularly (usually annually) records performance, potential and development needs in a top-down process - see our factsheet on performance appraisal for more information on this topic. What is performance appraisal? Performance appraisal is an important part of performance management. In itself it is not performance management, but it is one of the ranges of tools that can be used to manage performance. Because it is most usually carried out by line managers rather than HR professionals, it is important that they understand their role in performance management and how performance appraisal contributes to the overall aims of performance management - see our factsheet on performance management for more information on that topic. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 15
  • 16. Management thesis. The performance appraisal or review is essentially an opportunity for the individual and those concerned with their performance – most usually their line manager - to get together to engage in a dialogue about the individual’s performance, development and the support required from the manager. It should not be a top down process or an opportunity for one person to ask questions and the other to reply. It should be a free flowing conversation in which a range of views are exchanged. Performance appraisals usually review past behavior and so provide an opportunity to reflect on past performance. But to be successful they should also be used as a basis for making development and improvement plans and reaching agreement about that should be done in the future. The performance appraisal is often the central pillar of performance management and the CIPD performance management survey1 carried out in 2004 found that 65 per cent of organizations used individual annual appraisal, 27 per cent used twice-yearly appraisals and 10 percent used rolling appraisal. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 16
  • 17. Management thesis. However, it is a common mistake to assume that if organizations implement performance appraisals, they have performance management. This is not the case. Performance management is a holistic process bringing together many activities which collectively contribute to the effective management of individuals and teams in order to achieve high levels of organizational performance. Performance management is strategic in that it is about broader issues and long term goals and integrated in that it links various aspects of the business, people management, individuals and teams. Performance appraisal on the other hand is operational, short to medium term and concerned only with the individual and their performance and development. It is one of the tools of performance management and the data produced can feed into other elements of performance management but in itself can never be performance management. CIPD research2 stresses the importance of a positive relationship between individuals and line managers. Carried out sensitively, the performance appraisal is an important vehicle in developing and maintaining this relationship. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 17
  • 18. Management thesis. How to conduct a performance appraisal? The five key elements of the performance appraisal are: 1. Measurement – assessing performance against agreed targets and objectives. 2. Feedback – providing information to the individual on their performance and progress. 3. Positive reinforcement – emphasizing what has been done well and making only constructive criticism about what might be improved. 4. Exchange of views – a frank exchange of views about what has happened, how appraises can improve their performance, the support they need from their managers to achieve this and their aspirations for their future career. 5. Agreement – jointly coming to an understanding by all parties about what needs to be done to improve performance generally and overcome any issues raised in the course of the discussion. There is no one right way to conduct an appraisal. Some companies develop an appraisal form with space for appraisers to rate appraises on aspects of their work such as their contribution to the team, role development, effectiveness, etc. The approach will depend on the nature of the business and the people involved. However as a minimum it is helpful to have a form to collect consistent information on the appraisal. This may be in the form of a free dialogue from appraisers with the opportunity for appraises to reply and comment. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 18
  • 19. Management thesis. As a general rule it is helpful to have some information on the following: 1. Objectives - whether they were achieved and if not the reasons why. 2. Competence – whether individuals are performance below, within or above the requirements of the role. 3. Training – what training the individual has received in the review period and what training or development they would like to receive in the future? 4. Actions – a note of any actions that need to be carried out by the individual or the appraiser. There is a view that the content of appraisal discussions should be confidential to the individual and the appraiser. But increasing pressure to provide information to assess the contribution of people to organizational value makes it desirable that performance data be recorded and stored in such a way that it can be used to feel into indicators of human capital value. Increasingly organizations are putting more emphasis on the kind of behavior they want their employees to exhibit. Behavior, particularly management behavior, has been identified as a significant source of value. They are therefore not solely concerned with the achievement of objectives but how these were achieved. Some organizations are identifying a set of positive management behaviors for example and then rating against them. Others are identifying the behaviors associated with excellent service and rating against these in the appraisal process. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 19
  • 20. Management thesis. Again the design of the process will depend on what is important to the particular business and the achievement of their business objectives and will therefore be influenced by the wider performance management process. It is important that people don’t achieve their objectives at the expense of their colleague’s morale. Preparing for the meeting Both parties should prepare for the meeting beforehand if a successful outcome is to be delivered. The person conducting the meeting or the appraiser should: • Consider how well the individual has performed since the last meeting. • Consider to what extent any agreed development plans from the last meeting have been implemented. • Think about the feedback to be given at the meeting and the evidence that will be used to support it. • Review the factors that have affected performance both those within and outside the individual’s control. • Consider the points for discussion on the possible actions that can be taken by both parties to develop or improve performance. • Consider possible directions the individual’s career might take. • Consider possible objectives for the next review period. The individual or appraise should consider the following points: Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 20
  • 21. Management thesis. • What they have achieved during the review period, with examples and evidence. • Any examples of objectives not achieved with explanations. • What they most enjoy about the job and how they might want to develop the role. • Any aspect of the work in which improvement is required and how this might be achieved. • Their learning and development needs with arguments to support their case for specific training. • What level of support and guidance they require from their manager. • Their aspirations for the future both in the current role and in possible future roles. • Objectives for the next review period. Self-assessment In some instances it may be helpful to guide appraises through a self-assessment process encouraging them to assess and analyze their own performance as a basis for discussion and action. This can improve the quality of the appraisal discussion because an individual feel actively involved in the process and is encourages them to work through the points above beforehand. This can be particularly useful with more junior staff or those not used to appraisals. However, self assessment can only work if individuals have clear targets and standards against which to assess them. It can also only be effective in a climate of trust where individuals believe their appraisers will not take advantage of an open self-assessment. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 21
  • 22. Management thesis. What a good appraisal looks like A good and constructive appraisal meeting is one in which: • Appraises do most of the talking. • Appraisers listen actively to what they say. • There is scope for reflection and analysis. • Performance is analyzed not personality. • The whole period is reviewed and not just recent or isolated events. • Achievement is recognized and reinforced. • Ends positively with agreed action plans. A bad appraisal meeting: • Focuses on a catalogue of failures and omissions. • Is controlled by the appraiser. • Ends with disagreement between appraisers and appraise. Appraisal skills: All managers expected to carry out performance appraisal should have some training. Ideally this should not just be on the skills of performance appraisal – the ‘how’ to do it, but also on the reasons for performance appraisal the ‘why’ we do it. Managers should understand how it fits into the wider strategic process of performance management and how the information and data generated contributes to understanding of the capacity of the human capital of the organization to contribution to business strategy and value. A basic requirement is that appraisers have the skills to carry out an effective appraisal as described above. This means they ask the right questions, listen actively and provide feedback. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 22
  • 23. Management thesis. Asking the right questions The two main issues are to ensure that appraisers ask open and probing questions. Open questions are general rather than specific; they enable people to decide how they should be answered and encourage them to talk freely. Examples include: • How do you feel things have been going? • How do you see the job developing? • How do you feel about that? • Tell me, why do you think that happened? Probing questions dig deeper for more specific information on what happened or shy. They can should support for the individual’s answer and encourage them to provide more information about their feelings and attitudes and they can also be used to reflect back to the individual and check information. Examples would be: • That’s very interesting. Tell me more about ….? • To what extent do you think that …? • Have I got the right impression? Do you mean that ….? Listening:- Good listeners: • Concentrate on the speakers and are aware of behavior, body language and nuances that supplement what is being said. • Respond quickly when necessary but don’t interrupt. • Ask relevant questions to clarify meaning. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 23
  • 24. Management thesis. • Comment on points to demonstrate understanding but keep them short and do not inhibit the flow of the speaker. Giving feedback Feedback should be based on facts not subjective opinion and should always be backed up with evidence and examples. The aim of feedback should be to promote the understanding of the individual so that they are aware of the impact of their actions and behavior. It may require corrective action where the feedback indicates that something has gone wrong. However, wherever possible feedback should be used positively to reinforce the good and identify opportunities for further positive action. Giving feedback is a skill and those with no training should be discouraged from giving feedback. Feedback will work best when the following conditions are met: • Feedback is built in with individuals being given access to readily available information on their performance and progress. • Feedback is related to actual events, observed behaviors or actions. • Feedback describes events without judging them. • Feedback is accompanies by questions soliciting the individual’s opinion why certain things happened. • People are encouraged to come to their own conclusions about what happened and why. • There is understanding about what things went wrong and an emphasis on putting them right rather than censuring past behavior. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 24
  • 25. Management thesis. It can be argued that the perceived defects of appraisal systems (that line managers regarded them as irrelevant, involving form- filling to keep the personnel department happy, and not as a normal process of management) led to the development of more rounded concepts of performance management. Nevertheless, organizations with performance management systems need to provide those involved with the opportunity to reflect on past performance as a basis for making development and improvement plans, and the performance and development review meeting (note the terminology; it is not appraisal) provides this chance. The meeting must be constructive, and various techniques can be used to conduct the sort of open, free-flowing and honest meeting needed, with the reviewer doing most of the talking. Learning and development Employee development is the main route followed by most organizations to improved organizational performance, which in turn requires an understanding of the processes and techniques of organizational, team and individual learning. Performance reviews can be regarded as learning events, in which individuals can be encouraged to think about how and in which ways they want to develop. This can lead to the drawing up of a personal development plan (PDP) setting out the actions they propose to take (with the help of others, not least their managers) to develop themselves. To keep development separate from performance and salary discussions, development reviews may be held at other times, for example, on the anniversary of joining an organization. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 25
  • 26. Management thesis. Increasing emphasis on talent management also means that many organizations are re-defining performance management to align it to the need to identify, nurture and retain talent. Development programmes are reflecting the needs of succession plans and seeking to foster leadership skills. However, too much of an emphasis on talent management may be damaging to overall development needs and every effort needs to be made to ensure that development is inclusive, accessible and focused on developing organizational capability. Coaching Coaching is an important tool in learning and development. Coaching is developing a person's skills and knowledge so that their job performance improves, leading to the achievement of organizational objectives. Coaching is increasingly recognized as a significant responsibility of line managers, and can play an important part in a PDP. They will take place during the review meetings, but also and more importantly should be carried out throughout the year. For some managers coaching comes naturally, but for many they may not and training may be needed to improve their skills. See our factsheet on coaching for more information. Objectives and performance standards:- Objectives (some organizations prefer to use 'goals') describe something to be accomplished by individuals, departments and organizations over a period of time. They can be expressed as targets to be met (such as sales) and tasks to be completed by specified dates. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 26
  • 27. Management thesis. They can be work-related, referring to the results to be attained, or personal, taking the form of developmental objectives for individuals. Objectives need to be defined and agreed. They will relate to the overall purpose of the job and define performance areas - all the aspects of the job that contribute to achieving its overall purpose. Targets then need to be set for each performance area, for example, increase 'sales by x per cent', 'reduce wastage by y per cent' … Alongside objectives are performance standards. They are used when it is not possible to set time-based targets, or when there is a continuing objective which does not change significantly from one review period to the next and is a standing feature of the job. These should be spelled out in quantitative terms if possible, for example, speed of response to requests or meeting defined standards of accuracy. Competences and competencies Some organizations, but by no means all, use competences and competencies as components of performance management. Competences describe what people need to be able to do to perform a job well (the descriptions in National Vocational Qualifications are examples of competences). Competencies (more helpfully, 'behavioral competencies') are defined as the dimensions of behavior that lie behind competent performance. Though the language used does not help in making the distinction, to perform well it is necessary both to be able to do a job at a technically competent level and to have behaviors that reinforce those technical skills; an obvious example of behavior is the surgeon Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 27
  • 28. Management thesis. who needs a good bedside manner and to be able to communicate with colleagues, in addition to surgical skills. There are various techniques for measuring competence (some organizations prefer to use 'capability') and once an analysis has been made, it provides a tool for measuring performance and, of course, for providing development activities to help people meet the required standards. For more information, see our competencies factsheet. Measurement To improve performance, you need to know what current performance is. Measurement provides the basis for providing and generating feedback, and thus can build the platform for further success or identify where things are going less well so that corrective action can be taken. But what gets measured? Measure the wrong things, perhaps simply because they are easy to measure, and an entire performance management system can fall into disrepute. Use too many measures and you can't see the wood for the trees. For measuring performance, the achievement of objectives, levels of competency, standards of performance, and work outputs are used but the emphasis varies according to categories of staff - for example, a senior manager would be mainly measured by meeting objectives, but a production worker mainly by achieving outputs. Increasingly organizations are using more sophisticated measuring techniques such as balanced scorecards or ROI (return on investment). Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 28
  • 29. Management thesis. Individual and team performance needs to be capable of being linked in an understandable manner to organizational performance, and there are various approaches to this. They include the 'balanced scorecard', a set of measures that looks at the business from customer, internal, learning and financial perspectives; the European Foundation for Quality Management, which indicates that customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, and impact on society are achieved through leadership; and other economic measures, including traditional financial measures. Measures used will depend on the organization; for example, public service organizations are likely to use different measures from private companies. Pay:- Performance management is often linked with performance- related pay (PRP), although by no means all organizations claiming to use performance management have PRP. Nevertheless, PRP is an important element in many performance management schemes because it is believed to motivate; it is said to deliver the message that performance and competence are important, and it is thought to be fair to reward people according to their performance, contribution or competence. Others, though, believe that other factors are more important than PRP in motivation; that it is usually based on subjective assessments of performance, that it inhibits teamwork because of its individualistic nature, and that it leads to 'short- termism'. See our factsheet for more information on performance pay. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 29
  • 30. Management thesis. An alternative to PRP is competence-related pay, which provides for pay progression to be linked to levels of competence that people have achieved, using a competence profile or framework. The difficulty here is measuring competence, and some organizations use a mix of PRP and competence-related pay. Further possible pay systems are team-based pay, a kind of PRP for teams; and contribution-related pay which means paying for results plus competence, and for past performance and future success. Performance may be used to determine all or some aspects of pay. In many instances only non-consolidated bonus payments are linked to performance which tend to reflect organizational, team and individual performance whilst salary progression is linked to service, market rates and pay scales. Many organizations believe that when performance management is linked to pay the quality of performance discussions will inevitably deteriorate. Teams Team working has become an important part of life in many organizations, and where teams are permanent or for longstanding projects, measures can be based on team performance. They will mainly be concerned with output, activity levels (eg speed of servicing), customer service and satisfaction, and financial results. Indeed, team measures are not very different from those for individuals, and of course team members need to agree their objectives and receive feedback in the same way as if they were part of a team. Other team members can contribute towards this, in a process of peer review. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 30
  • 31. Management thesis. 360 degree feedback 360 degree feedback became increasingly talked about in the 1990s, if not widely used. It consists of performance data generated from a number of sources, who can include the person to whom the individual being assessed reports, people who report to them, peers (team colleagues or others in the organization), and internal and external customers. It can also include self-assessment. 360 degree feedback is used mainly as part of a self-development or management development programme, and is felt to provide a more rounded view of people, with less bias than if an assessment is conducted by one individual. See our factsheet on 360 feedbacks for more information. Performance problem solving:- Performance management is a positive process, and good systems will create a culture in which success is applauded. Nevertheless, poor performance will exist. It may be a result of inadequate leadership, bad management or defective systems of work, and if so, remedies (often involving learning and development) can be put in place. But individuals may under-perform and improvements can be achieved through continuing feedback and joint discussion between them and their managers, involving analyzing and identifying the problem, establishing the reasons for the shortfall, and deciding and agreeing the action to be taken. If all this fails, disciplinary action may need to be taken, as in any organization. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 31
  • 32. Management thesis. CIPD viewpoint:- Performance management is difficult to implement. It is about ownership by everyone in the organization, and especially line managers - it is emphatically not about guardianship by personnel departments. Surveys suggest that individuals and managers in organizations with performance management systems quite like it, and especially its emphasis on personal development, although performance-rating (often linked to PRP) often provokes hostility. Schemes can be over-detailed and require too much form-filling, and there can be a lack of definition in terms of what is meant by performance and how to achieve it. Schemes can be less successful than they might be because of lack of training, especially at the beginning. The keys to the successful introduction and application of performance management are: • Being clear about what is meant by performance. • Understanding what the organization is and needs to be in its performance culture. • Being very focused on how individual employees will benefit and play their part in the process. • Understanding that it is a tool for line managers and its success will depend on their ability to use it effectively. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 32
  • 33. Management thesis. Performance management is the systematic process by which an agency involves its employees, as individuals and members of a group, in improving organizational effectiveness in the accomplishment of agency mission and goals. Employee performance management includes: • Planning work and setting expectations, • Continually monitoring performance, • Developing the capacity to perform, • Periodically rating performance in a summary fashion, and • Rewarding good performance. The revisions made in 1995 to the Government wide performance appraisal and awards regulations support sound management principles. Great care was taken to ensure that the requirements those regulations establish would complement and not conflict with the kinds of activities and actions practiced in effective organizations as a matter of course. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 33
  • 34. Management thesis. In an effective organization, work is planned out in advance. Planning means setting performance expectations and goals for groups and individuals to channel their efforts toward achieving organizational objectives. Getting employees involved in the planning process will help them understand the goals of the organization, what needs to be done, why it needs to be done, and how well it should be done. The regulatory requirements for planning employees' performance include establishing the elements and standards of their performance appraisal plans. Performance elements and standards should be measurable, understandable, verifiable, equitable, and achievable. Through critical elements, employees are held accountable as individuals for work assignments or responsibilities. Employee performance plans should be flexible so that they can be adjusted for changing program objectives and work requirements. When used effectively, these plans can be beneficial working documents that are discussed often, and not merely paperwork that is filed in a drawer and seen only when ratings of record are required. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 34
  • 35. Management thesis. In an effective organization, assignments and projects are monitored continually. Monitoring well means consistently measuring performance and providing ongoing feedback to employees and work groups on their progress toward reaching their goals. Regulatory requirements for monitoring performance include conducting progress reviews with employees where their performance is compared against their elements and standards. Ongoing monitoring provides the opportunity to check how well employees are meeting predetermined standards and to make changes to unrealistic or problematic standards. And by monitoring continually, unacceptable performance can be identified at any time during the appraisal period and assistance provided to address such performance rather than wait until the end of the period when summary rating levels are assigned Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 35
  • 36. Management thesis. In an effective organization, employee developmental needs are evaluated and addressed. Developing in this instance means increasing the capacity to perform through training, giving assignments that introduce new skills or higher levels of responsibility, improving work processes, or other methods. Providing employees with training and developmental opportunities encourages good performance, strengthens job-related skills and competencies, and helps employees keep up with changes in the workplace, such as the introduction of new technology. Carrying out the processes of performance management provides an excellent opportunity to identify developmental needs. During planning and monitoring of work, deficiencies in performance become evident and can be addressed. Areas for improving good performance also stand out, and action can be taken to help successful employees improve even further Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 36
  • 37. Management thesis. From time to time, organizations find it useful to summarize employee performance. This can be helpful for looking at and comparing performance over time or among various employees. Organizations need to know who their best performers are. Within the context of formal performance appraisal requirements, rating means evaluating employee or group performance against the elements and standards in an employee's performance plan and assigning a summary rating of record. The rating of record is assigned according to procedures included in the organization's appraisal program. It is based on work performed during an entire appraisal period. The rating of record has a bearing on various other personnel actions, such as granting within-grade pay increases and determining additional retention service credit in a reduction in force. Note: Although group performance may have an impact on an employee's summary rating, a rating of record is assigned only to an individual, not to a group. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 37
  • 38. Management thesis. In an effective organization, rewards are used well. Rewarding means recognizing employees, individually and as members of groups, for their performance and acknowledging their contributions to the agency's mission. A basic principle of effective management is that all behavior is controlled by its consequences. Those consequences can and should be both formal and informal and both positive and negative. Good performance is recognized without waiting for nominations for formal awards to be solicited. Recognition is an ongoing, natural part of day-to-day experience. A lot of the actions that reward good performance — like saying "Thank you" — don't require a specific regulatory authority. Nonetheless, awards regulations provide a broad range of forms that more formal rewards can take, such as cash, time off, and many nonmonetary items. The regulations also cover a variety of contributions that can be rewarded, from suggestions to group accomplishments. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 38
  • 39. Management thesis. Managing Performance Effectively. In effective organizations, managers and employees have been practicing good performance management naturally all their lives, executing each key component process well. Goals are set and work is planned routinely. Progress toward those goals is measured and employees get feedback. High standards are set, but care is also taken to develop the skills needed to reach them. Formal and informal rewards are used to recognize the behavior and results that accomplish the mission. All five component processes working together and supporting each other achieve natural, effective performance management. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 39
  • 40. Management thesis. NEED FOR STUDY:- • Here the need for the study is that I want to see the theory in practical. How it is practiced in the Mahindra and Mahindra. • The second need is to complete the MT-I successfully. • MT-I is the curriculum pattern of our MBA. • Who should be involved in the performance management activities? • What should be measured? • What standards should be used or set, and how? • How is quality improvement efforts carried out? How is progress reported for use in decision making? Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 40
  • 41. Management thesis. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY:- • To know about the performance management in the organization. • To know about the performance management effects on the organization. • To know the performance management program. • To know what are the different tools and techniques implemented for performance management program. • To know the purpose and importance of performance management and its effect on employee performance. • To know the benefits of performance management as per view of the employees as well as organization. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 41
  • 42. Management thesis. SCOPE OF THE STUDY:- • To gain a practical knowledge about the performance management needs and process from referents who really undergone realistic practice. • The best way of managing and making understood about the performance management. • To know about the actual and well development of manpower by the human resource management of organization. • To know about the importance of performance management towards the success of an organization. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 42
  • 43. Management thesis. LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY:- • Data analysis is bit complicated as compared to other measures. • The study was time consuming. • Available data was limited. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 43
  • 44. Management thesis. RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY:- The information requirements for solving a problem are identified in the problem formation stage. In this stage, the sources from which information can be found are identified. Data for a research can be collected from two sources. Primary data and secondary data. 1. Primary data:- Surveying the sampling units or the elements of the sampling units collects Primary data. Primary data is the first hand information gathered to solve the research need. It is collected using research instruments like questionnaires, mailers, telephonic interviews etc. 2. Secondary data:- Secondary data is collected from already available sources such as published papers, journals, magazines, reports, company literature etc. compared to Primary data, the collection of secondary data is cheaper and less time consuming. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 44
  • 45. Management thesis. CHAPTER-II COMPANY PROFILE:- Mahindra & Mahindra Limited is part of the US $6.7 billion Mahindra Group, an automotive, farm equipment, financial services, trade and logistics, automotive components, after-market, IT and infrastructure conglomerate. The company was set up in 1945 as Mahindra & Mohammed.[ Later, after the partition of India, Mr. Ghulam Mohammad migrated to Pakistan and became that nation's first finance minister. Hence, the name was changed from Mahindra & Mohammed to Mahindra & Mahindra in 1948. Initially set up to manufacture general-purpose utility vehicles, Mahindra & Mahindra (M&M) was first known for assembly of the iconic Jeep in India. The company later branched out into manufacture of light commercial vehicles (LCVs) and agricultural tractors agricultural tractors, rapidly growing from being a manufacturer of army vehicles and tractors to an automobile major with a growing global market. At present, M&M is the leader in the utility vehicle (UV) segment in India with its flagship UV, the Scorpio (known as the Mahindra Goa in Italy). Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 45
  • 46. Management thesis. BUSINESS:- Mahindra & Mahindra grew from being a maker of army vehicles to a major automobile and tractor manufacturer. It has acquired plants in China and the United Kingdom and has three assembly plants in the USA. M&M has partnerships with international companies like Renault SA, France and International Truck and Engine Corporation, USA. M&M has a global presence and its products are exported to several countries..Its global subsidiaries include Mahindra Europe Srl. based in Italy, Mahindra USA Inc., Mahindra South Africa and Mahindra (China) Tractor Co. Ltd. M&M is the third largest tractor company in the world. It is also the largest manufacturer of tractors in India with sustained market leadership of around 25 years. It designs, develops, manufactures and markets tractors as well as farm implements. Mahindra (China) Tractor Co. Ltd. manufactures tractors for the growing Chinese market and is a hub for tractor exports to the USA and other western nations. M&M has a 100% subsidiary, Mahindra USA, which assembles products for the American market. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 46
  • 47. Management thesis. M&M made its entry into the passenger car segment with the Logan in April 2007 under the Mahindra Renault joint venture. M&M will make its maiden entry into the heavy trucks segment with Mahindra International, the joint venture with International Truck, USA. M&M's automotive division makes a wide range of vehicles including MUVs, LCVs and three wheelers. It offers over 20 models including new generation multi-utility vehicles like the Scorpio and the Bolero. At the recent Delhi Auto Show, Mahindra executives said the company is pursuing an aggressive product expansion program that will see the launch of several new platforms and vehicles over the next three years, including an entry-level SUV designed to seat five passengers and powered by a small turbo diesel engine. Later in 2008, it will unveil the all-new Ingenio SUV, which will be joined in 2009 by a pickup derivative. In early 2008, Mahindra commenced its first overseas CKD operations with the launch of the Mahindra Scorpio in Egypt, in partnership with the Bavarian Auto Group. This was soon followed by assembly facilities in Brazil. Vehicles assembled at the Plant in Bramont, Manaus, include Scorpio Pik Ups in single and double cab pick-up body styles as well as sports utility. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 47
  • 48. Management thesis. The US based Reputation Institute recently ranked Mahindra among the top 10 Indian companies in its 'Global 200: The World's Best Corporate Reputations' list. Mahindra is also gearing up to sell the Scorpio SUV and pickup next year in North America, through an independent distributor, Global Vehicles USA, based in Alpharetta, Georgia. AWARD:- 1. Bombay Chamber Good Corporate Citizen Award for 2006-07 2. Business world FICCI-SEDF Corporate Social Responsibility Award – 2007 3. Deming Application Prize 4. Japan Quality Medal in 2007. MODELS:- • Mahindra Thar • Mahindra Bolero o Mahindra Bolero Camper • Mahindra Scorpio o Mahindra Scorpio Getaway • Mahindra Legend • Mahindra-Renault Logan (in cooperation with Renault) • Mahindra Axe. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 48
  • 49. Management thesis. MAHINDRA GROUP:- Core Business Activities • Automotive • Farm Equipment • Systech • Trade & Financial Service • Information Technology • Infrastructure Development Community Initiatives • Mahindra United World College of India • Mahindra United, a football club based in Mumbai, Maharashtra • Mahindra Foundation • K. C. Mahindra Education Trust: Nanhi Kali Type Conglomerate Founded 1945 Headquarters Mumbai Key people Keshub Mahindra (Chairman), Anand G.Mahindra (Vice- Chairman & Managing Director) Industry Automotive Revenue US$ 6.7 billion (2008) Employees 65,000 plus Website www.mahindra.com/ Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 49
  • 50. Management thesis. IV. RESEARCH AND DESING WELLNESS QUOTIENT @ M&M A company is as good as its employees. To rephrase this truth, a company’s image and success is, and should be, a reflection of the collective well being of its employees. Mahindra & Mahindra, as a good corporate citizen with a growing global presence and customer base, has always put Wellness Quotient high up in its workplace philosophy Says Mr. Rajeev Dubey, President, HR & Corporate Services and Member of the Group Management Board, “The fundamental challenge is to create an organization that is characterized by extreme performance and extreme care. This involves simultaneously looking in and looking out: creating the inner calm, strength and resilience in the individual, and managing certain critical institutional factors in the realm of action (Karma). Hence a holistic multi-pronged approach is required, which must ultimately embrace all employees and pervade every action in the organization.” Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 50
  • 51. Management thesis. So the question is: How does a US$ 3.2 billion industrial powerhouse with a clear strategy and goal to “outperform” in every one of its sectors manage to keep its team of 25,000 and growing employees in fine fettle? M&M strives to achieve this with a fine Wellness Matrix in place, which combines performance management, work life balance, and an effective employee satisfaction process. Besides, every company in the Group has its own set of creative initiatives in place to monitor and tackle wellness. STRESS MANAGEMENT @ MAHINDRA -- THE HOLISTIC TRIANGLE:- Innovation has been a tradition in M&M. It has helped us grow as an organization, and is now helping us stay together as a family despite the immense pressure to outperform in the marketplace. The stress matrix is a three pronged method that M&M employees have the option of using to beat the mental and physical demands of work pressure – Yoga, Seva and Karma Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 51
  • 52. Management thesis. Opines Mr.Dubey, “Stress is a phenomenon faced by everyone working in an organization that seeks to create competitive advantage in today’s marketplace, both domestically and globally. There is creative stress, which is desirable. But we need to continually combat the tendency for stretch goals to create destructive stress or distress, which destroys the organization’s value-creation ability and its human beings. An innovative combination of initiatives involving yoga, community service and the workings of the performance-cum-time management process is being deployed by us to tackle this issue.” YOGA SESSIONS TO BEAT THE BLUES:- A “Holistic Stress Management” Program was initiated in Mumbai on December 21, ‘05 for employees. Swami Rajeshkumarji, M.Sc. (Applied Yogic Science), a Wellness expert from the world- famous Bihar School of Yoga, has designed the program and is unrolling it in Worli and Kandivili, to begin with. He has several years of rich experience teaching Stress Management in organizations and in the public domain alike. The approach is holistic i.e. wellness at mental, physical and emotional levels. He has already provided valuable Yoga lessons to participants of residential training programs at MMDC, Bodhi Vriksha, Nashik and has been widely appreciated. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 52
  • 53. Management thesis. Swami Rajeshkumarji conducting a yoga session. A yoga session in progress Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 53
  • 54. Management thesis. These classes take place every Tuesday and Thursday at Worli, and every Wednesday and Friday at the Kandivili plant between 5:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m., and have received an enthusiastic response from numerous employees who have participated and benefited from them so far. Seeing the enthusiastic response, it has been decided that such wellness classes would be initiated at other locations in the country. Another avenue being explored is Ayurveda treatment. A Mahindra Life space has a unique arrangement with the famous Kerala Vaidyashala wherein employees can avail of medical treatment like massages and other herbal treatment. Mahindra Life spaces employees get a special package under the arrangement with Kerala Vaidyashala. SEVA: CARING QUOTIENT TO WELLNESS QUOTIENT:- It is not only Yoga but Seva also that helps bust stress. It is by far the most innovative option M&M has given its employees by way of enhancing wellness. ESOPs or Employee Social Options is a term that has become iconic after it was first proposed during the inauguration of M&M’s 60th year celebrations. M&M decided to unleash the Seva power of its 25,000-strong workforce by enabling employees to donate thousands of human hours for various social projects. The vision is to have a Mahindra employee contributing to society somewhere in India on any given day of the year. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 54
  • 55. Management thesis. Seva enables employees to look beyond the work-day constraints of self, family and profession. It helps relax the mind by freeing it of personal goals and self-centeredness where stress and worry reside. Social service and selfless activity also help employees enhance their creativity and innovation. Imagine working with needy girl children as part of a vacation activity, or teaching poor school kids during a weekend. One refreshes not only one’s mind, but also one’s whole personality. Shramdaan at BMC Hindi Shala Girls School, Kandivili in progress. M&M employees have been involved in a host of community activities both as contribution to the Group CSR activities and their own departmental programmes. For instance, on April 9, M&M employees across all Sectors performed Shramdaan at the BMC Hindi Shala, Kandivli, Mumbai. Scraping the iron grills in preparation of a fresh coat of paint, cleaning the compound, whitewashing the corridors, no job was too small, no designation too big to deter Mahindraites from performing Shramdaan. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 55
  • 56. Management thesis. Says Ms. Yasmin Menon of Club Mahindra, “We at Club Mahindra find great joy in giving, and such activities significantly work towards creating the balance required in our lives as Mahindra employees.” Club Mahindra holds blood donation camps and spends time with people who live in foster homes. The feedback from employees is that delving into problems of the needy has helped spiritually mitigate their own issues. Club Mahindra employees recently raised funds to sponsor 120 Nanhi Kalis. KARMA: PERFORMANCE AND TIME MANAGEMENT:- Hard work never killed anyone, sloth can. Nowhere is this axiom better demonstrated than at M&M. Karma is the third arrow in M&M’s quiver of stress management initiatives and its most dynamic one. As the title suggests, this aspect has two dimensions – managing performance and managing time. Says Mr. Rajeev Dubey, “At its most fundamental level, stress comes from fear, which in turn is strongly related to uncertainty and inaction. Fear of failure, fear of ridicule and humiliation, fear of non-acceptance or rejection by peers/superiors/subordinates and family members, fear of not being able to meet targets and timelines. Reducing the element of uncertainty, and using time most productively through ACTION (Karma), is a time-tested stress buster. We are trying to use the Performance Management System to achieve this goal. It must be noted that communication and listening are a critical part of this process, which Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 56
  • 57. Management thesis. must result in a continual dialogue across levels to mutually support the achievement of targets.” TIME MANAGEMENT:- This is an aspect of managing stress that is tackled at two levels at M&M – individual and organizational. Are we using time most effectively? At the individual level, employees are encouraged to prioritize work by clearly identifying roles, responsibilities and targets. Being a methodical worker helps optimize inputs allowing time to relax or pursue activities that enhance skills. Where the organizational support comes is in terms of managing meetings and setting targets. Are meetings planned to give maximum deliverables in the shortest time? Are time limits and deliverables clearly defined and adhered to? Do meetings begin and end on time, and do they adhere to the pre-defined purpose and agenda? The Auto Sector, for example, has a system in place wherein persons responsible for delaying A meeting would be fined and the money collected would go in to fund employee wellness activities. Apart from harnessing time and performance management to optimize work output, many departments have, or are in the process of considering, Open House forums to discuss work-life balance and stress. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 57
  • 58. Management thesis. SOME OF THE IDEAS THAT HAVE BEEN MOOTED AT VARIOUS HR AND WORK-RELATED MEETINGS INCLUDE ISSUES LIKE:- Some ideas:- • Not being compelled to work on weekends and holidays • Manage meetings effectively with regard to agenda, purpose and time limits. Enforce stricter timings • Avoid slotting meetings on weekends, holidays and post-lunch on Saturdays • Prioritization of work by way of clearly identifying roles and responsibilities Apart from harnessing time and performance management to optimize work output, many departments have, or are in the process of considering, Open House forums to discuss work-life balance and stress. Mahindra Life spaces have an interesting option in place for wellness – paternity leave. Employees are entitled to 4 days of paternity leave for not more than two occasions. JOSH AT THE WORKPLACE:- JOSH, the Annual Confluence of the HR Fraternity of the M&M Group, took place on Friday, February 24, 2006. The programmer had over 150 IR and HR executives from across the Group sharing their thoughts. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 58
  • 59. Management thesis. In one of the sessions during the day, it was decided to take up burning issues at the Workplace and do Group work on those issues. Using the modern tool of “Open Space Technology”, six Workgroups were formed who organized and empowered themselves to ideate, brainstorm, confabulate, converge and present their findings on such topical issues as: Work–life balance Humor and fun at the workplace enhancing bottom- up communication. HR FRATERNITY AT JOSH Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 59
  • 60. Management thesis. SOME OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS BY THE GROUPS ON WORK-LIFE BALANCE AND FUN AT THE WORKPLACE WERE:- — Organization to develop a family Satisfaction Index to determine how satisfied Employees’ families are, as far as attention to Family time goes. — No meetings to be normally scheduled beyond regular working hours. — Web-conferencing to become ubiquitous and replace physical meetings. — Laughter therapy to be used during morning meetings to liven up the atmosphere. — HODs to advocate non-working on weekends and Holidays – he should discourage and keep a check. — Should question the concerned persons, if this becomes a regular phenomenon. Genuine appreciation of work, at the end of the day, would act as great motivator. — Interiors of office should be made more lively using bright colors. — Usage of Fun and motivational posters and smileys all over to de- stress employees. — Policy that no manager can coerce an employee to work on Holidays and weekends. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 60
  • 61. Management thesis. TACKLING STRESS AT M&M:- “Josh stress can be defined as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. Job stress can lead to poor health and even injury.” [Stress at work, (United States National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, 1999.] Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 61
  • 62. Management thesis. HR: Human Resources, or Humane Resources Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 62
  • 63. Management thesis. Your problem What M&M Human Resources does for you? You are feeling overloaded. You feel you are dumped with an amount of work or type of work that is beyond your capacity. Make sure employees understand what they have to do and how to do it. Meet training needs Consider whether working flexible hours would help employees to manage demands. You feel disaffected and perform poorly. You have no say over how and when you do work. Involve employees in the way work is carried out. Consult employees about decisions. MBA III sem Mahananda.B. 63
  • 64. Management thesis. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY The data is collected with the help of questionnaire which I have shown in the questionnaire section. The person has to give the number from 0 to 10 to their employee performance. On this bases the below data is interpreted. 360 Degree Feedback For 32 Employees of Mahindra and Mahindra automotive industry From Bidar. S. Direct Indirect External No Name Boss Peers reports report customer Overall 1 ASHISH 0 5 5 0 0 10 2 SATISH 1 2 3 1 0 7 3 KARTIK 0 2 9 4 0 17 4 KARAN 0 5 3 4 0 12 5 HEMANT 1 4 6 4 10 25 6 RAGHU 0 10 8 3 0 37 7 DAVID 1 1 3 3 0 8 8 SHIV 1 6 12 2 0 21 9 GAURAV 2 5 1 2 0 29 10 SANTOSH 1 6 5 6 0 18 11 FEROZ 1 9 12 11 0 33 12 SRIKANT 1 3 3 2 0 51 13 VINAY 1 2 8 4 0 15 14 VIKAS 0 8 8 9 0 25 15 BHARAT 0 4 10 2 0 40 16 ABHISEKH 1 1 3 3 0 8 17 KIRAN 2 3 2 3 3 13 18 RAVI 1 2 2 0 21 19 SUBHASH 2 3 3 5 4 17 20 RAKESH 0 5 9 2 4 20 21 RAMESH 1 2 8 1 0 37 22 KAMESH 1 3 6 3 4 17 23 FEDOL 1 4 8 5 4 22 24 NANNU 2 0 9 5 0 39 Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 64
  • 65. Management thesis. 25 KESHAV 2 8 8 1 0 19 26 VISHAL 3 2 4 4 13 26 27 RAHUL 2 3 5 1 0 45 28 SUNIL 0 1 7 3 3 14 29 SACHIN 2 3 7 3 11 26 30 OMKAR 2 3 5 0 0 40 31 NATH S. 2 2 2 2 6 14 32 ANAND 2 2 13 1 10 28 overall 36 119 197 36 72 754 360 DELEGATION Sr. Average % highest % lowest % No. Indicator of delegation score score score 1 He generally prepares his juniors to wait for his return 19 98 0 than take decisions in his absence. 2 He does not leave routine decisions entirely to the 28 18 0 lower levels. 3 Generally his in-tray piles up with files and papers when 22 95 0 he goes away on tour. 4 He is cautious and does not let his subordinates take 17 95 0 even minor risks. 5 He spends time on activities and problems that he was handling before his last promotion/or his previous 18 70 0 job. 6 he prefers his subordinates to check with him whenever 55 100 0 a problem arises in an on-going project or assignment 7 He likes to keep himself fully involved in everything being 32 80 0 handled by his subordinates. 8 He likes to be consulted even on matters where a 24 95 0 rule or precedent already exists. 9 We often wish he would not spend time doing work which 17 81 0 we can easily handle. 10 He is often rushing to meet 29 58 0 deadlines. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 65
  • 66. Management thesis. Overall 790 261 8 Scores for the behavior Hig score Low score Average score The above pie chart which is given is a score chart for the employee. In blue color the high score is given. The high score is 790. In pink color the lower score is give. The lower score is 261. In yellow color the average score is given. The average number is 0. In pie chart the average is not shown because it is zero. This is called 360 degree delegation. HIGH SCORING BEHAVIOR s. Highest % No. Behavior dimensions Average % score Lowest % score score 1 Clear and persuasive communication rather than unclear and long 85 68 100 winded communication 2 Active rather than 85 57 100 passive 3 Takes positive approach rather than 84 70 95 negative approach 4 Change oriented rather 83 63 97 than status quo oriented 5 Encouraging rather 83 70 97 than discouraging TOTAL 420 328 489 Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 66
  • 67. Management thesis. Here one more method is used to measure the performance of the employee because the 360 degree appraisal was not enough. So that the 360 delegation is used. The data is given above table you can see here. LOWEST SCORING FIVE BEHAVIOR S. Highest % No Behavior Quality Average % Score Lowest % Score Score Empathetic rather than corrective (68% score indicating that they could 1 be 32% corrective) 68 46 87 Participative rather than 2 authoritarian 69 36 92 Calm and composed rather 3 than irritable 71 33 100 Patient and accepting rather than impatient and 4 intolerable. 71 48 100 Proactive rather than 5 reactive 71 43 90 Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 67
  • 68. Management thesis. FINDINGS:- • The approach is holistic i.e. wellness at mental, physical and emotional levels. • Their mission is to maintain the stress of their employees. • The holistic method is used to manage the performance of the employees. • Time Management. • Yoga has been used to performance management. • Karma used here. • The employees are evaluated with the help of 360 degree appraisal. • They are role model for the other organization. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 68
  • 69. Management thesis. SUGGESTION:- • They should continue the innovativeness. • They should use other tool to manage the performance of the employees. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 69
  • 70. Management thesis. CONCLUSION:- There is a great degree of variation in the effective performance of roles, styles, delegation and qualities. This indicates the need for 360 degree feedback as a tool to create more self awareness. They are not yet taking direct responsibility for developing others as leaders. They seem to do little to inspire and develop their juniors. While, they are good at articulating their vision communicating the same to their juniors, the impact of this gets limited. They are not able to teach others about hw to make the organization successful. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 70
  • 71. Management thesis. BIBLIOGRAPHY:- • Web site search engine Google has been used. • Performance management books. • Magazines which are printed be the mahindra automotive. • Help of other person From Mahindra. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 71
  • 72. Management thesis. Annexes:- Questionnaire: Question No-1 Name of S.No Evaluator 1 Boss 2 Peers 3 Direct Reporters 4 Indirect Reporters 5 External Customers Question No-2 Sr. No. Indicator of delegation % score 1 He generally prepares his juniors to wait for his return than take decisions in his absence. 2 He does not leave routine decisions entirely to the lower levels. 3 Generally his in-tray piles up with files and papers when he goes away on tour. 4 He is cautious and does not let his subordinates take even minor risks. Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 72
  • 73. Management thesis. 5 He spends time on activities and problems that he was handling before his last promotion/or his previous job. 6 He prefers his subordinates to check with him whenever a problem arises in an on-going project or assignment 7 He likes to keep himself fully involved in everything being handled by his subordinates. 8 He likes to be consulted even on matters where a rule or precedent already exists. 9 We often wish he would not spend time doing work which we can easily handle. 10 He is often rushing to meet deadlines. overall Question No-3 s. No. Behavior dimensions % score clear and persuasive communication rather than unclear and long 1 winded communication Active rather than 2 passive Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 73
  • 74. Management thesis. Takes positive approach rather than 3 negative approach Change oriented rather 4 than status quo oriented Encouraging rather 5 than discouraging Question No-4 S. Behavior Quality % Score No 1 Empathetic rather than corrective (68% score indicating that they could be 32% corrective) 2 Participative rather than authoritarian Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 74
  • 75. Management thesis. 3 Calm and composed rather than irritable 4 Patients and accepting rather than impertinent and intolerable. 5 Proactive rather than reactive SCHEDULE: Week Activity 1st week (30th July) To decide title of MT & to prepare synopsis Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 75
  • 76. Management thesis. 2nd week (3rd Aug ) Collecting the information which is required for the MT 3rd week (10th Aug) Preparation of questionnaire to collect data from customers as well as proprietor. 4th week (24th Aug) Collecting data from proprietor of ICICI Prudential Life Insurance Company Limited 5th week (31st Aug) No work on this week because of exams 6th week (7th Sep) Preparing for interim report 7th week (21st Sep) Collecting more information about MT 8th week (28th Sep) Collecting information from employees 9th week (5th Oct) Collecting information from employees 10th week (12th Oct) Analyzing the collected data 11th week (19th -21 st Oct) Preparing required charts and graphs which are related to the topic & Preparation of the final thesis 12th week (22nd -23 rd submission of final thesis Oct) Mahananda.B. MBA III sem 76

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