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The presentation is about Finance and various concepts in Finance which influence the decision-making in a company are discussed.

The presentation is about Finance and various concepts in Finance which influence the decision-making in a company are discussed.

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  • The lot purchase would be for speculative purposes.
  • Thus, a 2% increase in the rate of return leads to over $7000 of additional interest earned over the 30 years. Without compounding, a 2% rate-of-return difference over 30 years would lead to a 60% difference in FV. But because of the magic of compounding, the difference here is 74% ($17450 is 74% bigger than $10063).
  • To help your students understand the concept of diminishing marginal utility, you might ask them: Would a poor person or a rich person be more excited about finding a $20 bill on the sidewalk? Students will answer the poor person. $20 means more to someone with little wealth than someone with lots of wealth. But this is exactly the type of reasoning behind the concept of diminishing marginal utility. And, as the next slide shows, it helps explain why people are risk averse.
  • Example of adverse selection: People with chronic illnesses have more incentive to buy health insurance (provided it covers their treatment) than other people. Example of moral hazard: People with good fire insurance have less incentive to replace the batteries in their smoke detectors.
  • Just a quick check to see if students understand the difference between moral hazard and adverse selection.
  • If your students have had a statistics course, you can replace “not strongly related” with “not highly correlated.”
  • Even a portfolio with 40 stocks still has risk, because you just can’t eliminate market risk through diversification.
  • It’s easy to look up the price. But how does one determine the stock’s value?
  • The objective of this exercise is to help students see for themselves that the value of a share of stock equals the present value of dividends received plus the present value of the final sale price. Some students may need a hint to get started.
  • This brief exercise gets students thinking about whether it is possible to pick good stocks. They will feel more invested (no pun intended) in the material covered on the remaining slides of this chapter. Instructions: Read the question aloud. Ask students to raise their hands if they vote for choice “A.” Make a mental note of the approximate number of students who vote for “A.” Repeat for B, C, and D. After voting is complete, pick the choice that received the most votes. Ask students who voted for that choice to tell you why they picked it. Do the same for the second most popular choice. Common reasons students pick “A”: Merrill Lynch is reputable, they have a research department with highly paid analysts. Your broker has much more expertise than you, and spends a lot more time than you following the market. Therefore, he is more likely to find the good stocks than you. Common reasons students pick “B”: Brokers make a commission whenever you buy, even if the stock depreciates later.
  • The figures for managed funds of a given class (large cap, medium cap, small cap) are asset-weighted averages of all managed funds in the class. The expense ratio of a fund includes all the expenses (fees) of owning the fund as a percentage of the fund’s value. The returns in the first column are net of expenses, so it is fair to compare them. In each asset class, the index fund beats the average of all managed funds in that class. Source: Standard and Poor’s Indices Versus Active Funds (SPIVA) Scorecard, Fourth Quarter 2006. http://www.standardandpoors.com http://www.spiva.standardandpoors.com This source has gobs of great information on this topic. Example: the % of actively managed funds that underperform the S&P 500 at different time horizons. Also, it reports various categories of funds, such as sector funds, international funds, and fixed income funds, and compares their performance at various time horizons to the corresponding index funds. Unfortunately, this project was discontinued, and the most recent SPIVA report available is for 2007:Q1. Hence, I will not be able to update the data on this slide. If you know where I can get more recent data of this type, please let me know! I would love to update the data on this slide on a regular basis. Contact me at: ron.cronovich@gmail.com

Transcript

  • 1. The Basic Tools of Finance 0 P R I N C I P L E S O F
  • 2.
    • What is “present value”? How can we use it to compare sums of money from different times?
    • Why are people risk averse? How can risk-averse people use insurance and diversification to manage risk?
    • What determines the value of an asset? What is the “efficient markets hypothesis”? Why is beating the market nearly impossible?
    0 In this Presentation, look for the answers to these questions
  • 3. INTRODUCTION
    • The financial system coordinates saving and investment.
    • Participants in the financial system make decisions regarding the allocation of resources over time and the handling of risk.
    • Finance is the field that studies such decision making.
    0
  • 4.
    • To compare a sums from different times, we use the concept of present value.
    • The present value of a future sum: the amount that would be needed today to yield that future sum at prevailing interest rates.
    • Related concept: The future value of a sum: the amount the sum will be worth at a given future date, when allowed to earn interest at the prevailing rate.
    0
  • 5.
    • Deposit $100 in the bank at 5% interest. What is the future value (FV) of this amount?
    • In N years, FV = $100(1 + 0.05) N
    • In three years, FV = $100(1 + 0.05) 3 = $115.76
    • In two years, FV = $100(1 + 0.05) 2 = $110.25
    • In one year, FV = $100(1 + 0.05) = $105.00
    0
  • 6.
    • Deposit $100 in the bank at 5% interest. What is the future value (FV) of this amount?
    • In N years, FV = $100(1 + 0.05) N
    • In this example, $100 is the present value (PV).
    • In general, FV = PV(1 + r ) N where r denotes the interest rate (in decimal form).
    • Solve for PV to get:
    PV = FV/(1 + r ) N 0
  • 7.
    • Suppose r = 0.06. Should General Motors spend $100 million to build a factory that will yield $200 million in ten years?
    • Solution: Find present value of $200 million in 10 years:
    • PV = ($200 million)/(1.06) 10 = $112 million
    • Since PV > cost of factory, GM should build it.
    Present value formula: PV = FV/(1 + r ) N 0
  • 8.
    • Instead, suppose r = 0.09. Should General Motors spend $100 million to build a factory that will yield $200 million in ten years?
    • Solution: Find present value of $200 million in 10 years:
    • PV = ($200 million)/(1.09) 10 = $84 million
    • Since PV < cost of factory, GM should not build it.
    present value helps explain why investment falls when the interest rate rises 0
  • 9. A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 1 : PRESENT VALUE
    • You are thinking of buying a six-acre lot for $70,000. The lot will be worth $100,000 in 5 years.
      • A. Should you buy the lot if r = 0.05?
      • B. Should you buy it if r = 0.10?
    0
  • 10. A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 1 : ANSWERS
    • You are thinking of buying a six-acre lot for $70,000. The lot will be worth $100,000 in 5 years.
      • A. Should you buy the lot if r = 0.05?
      • PV = $100,000/(1.05) 5 = $78,350 . PV of lot > price of lot. Yes , buy it.
      • B. Should you buy it if r = 0.10?
      • PV = $100,000/(1.1) 5 = $62,090 . PV of lot < price of lot. No , do not buy it.
    0
  • 11.
    • Compounding : the accumulation of a sum of money where the interest earned on the sum earns additional interest
    • Because of compounding, small differences in interest rates lead to big differences over time.
    • Example: Buy $1000 worth of Microsoft stock, hold for 30 years.
      • If rate of return = 0.08, FV = $10,063
      • If rate of return = 0.10, FV = $17,450
    0
  • 12.
    • The Rule of 70: If a variable grows at a rate of x percent per year, that variable will double in about 70/ x years.
    • Example:
      • If interest rate is 5%, a deposit will double in about 14 years.
      • If interest rate is 7%, a deposit will double in about 10 years.
    0
  • 13.
    • Most people are risk averse – they dislike uncertainty.
    • Example: You are offered the following gamble. Toss a fair coin.
      • If heads, you win $1000.
      • If tails, you lose $1000.
    • Should you take this gamble?
    • If you are risk averse, the pain of losing $1000 would exceed the pleasure of winning $1000, so you should not take this gamble.
    0
  • 14.
    • As wealth rises, the curve becomes flatter due to diminishing marginal utility :
    • the more wealth a person has, the less extra utility he would get from an extra dollar.
    Utility is a subjective measure of well-being that depends on wealth. 0 Wealth Utility Current wealth Current utility
  • 15.
    • Because of diminishing marginal utility, a $1000 loss reduces utility more than a $1000 gain increases it.
    0 Wealth Utility – 1000 +1000 Utility loss from losing $1000 Utility gain from winning $1000
  • 16.
    • How insurance works: A person facing a risk pays a fee to the insurance company, which in return accepts part or all of the risk.
    • Insurance allows risks to be pooled, and can make risk averse people better off:
    • E.g. , it is easier for 10,000 people to each bear 1/10,000 of the risk of a house burning down than for one person to bear the entire risk alone.
    0
  • 17.
    • 1. Adverse selection : A high-risk person benefits more from insurance, so is more likely to purchase it.
    • 2. Moral hazard : People with insurance have less incentive to avoid risky behavior.
    Insurance companies cannot fully guard against these problems, so they must charge higher prices. As a result, low-risk people sometimes forego insurance and lose the benefits of risk-pooling. 0
  • 18. A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 2 : ADVERSE SELECTION OR MORAL HAZARD?
    • Identify whether each of the following is an example of adverse selection or moral hazard.
      • A. Joe begins smoking in bed after buying fire insurance.
      • B. Both of Susan’s parents lost their teeth to gum disease, so Susan buys dental insurance.
      • C. When Gertrude parks her Corvette convertible, she doesn’t bother putting the top up, because her insurance covers theft of any items left in the car.
    0
  • 19. A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 2 : ANSWERS
    • Identify whether each of the following is an example of adverse selection or moral hazard.
      • A. Joe begins smoking in bed after buying fire insurance.
      • moral hazard
      • B. Both of Susan’s parents lost their teeth to gum disease, so Susan buys dental insurance.
      • adverse selection
      • C. When Gertrude parks her Corvette convertible, she doesn’t bother putting the top up, because her insurance covers theft of any items left in the car.
      • moral hazard
    0
  • 20.
    • We can measure risk of an asset with the standard deviation , a statistic that measures a variable’s volatility – how likely it is to fluctuate.
    • The higher the standard deviation of the asset’s return, the greater the risk.
    0
  • 21.
    • Diversification reduces risk by replacing a single risk with a large number of smaller, unrelated risks.
    • A diversified portfolio contains assets whose returns are not strongly related:
      • Some assets will realize high returns, others low returns.
      • The high and low returns average out, so the portfolio is likely to earn an intermediate return more consistently than any of the assets it contains.
    0
  • 22.
    • Diversification can reduce firm-specific risk , which only a single company.
    • Diversification cannot reduce market risk , which affects all companies in the stock market.
    0
  • 23.
    • Increasing the number of stocks reduces firm-specific risk.
    Standard dev of portfolio return # of stocks in portfolio 0 0 10 20 30 40 50 0 10 20 30 40 But market risk remains.
  • 24.
    • One of the Ten Principles from Chapter 1: People face tradeoffs .
    • A tradeoff between risk and return: Riskier assets pay a higher return, on average, to compensate for the extra risk of holding them.
    • E.g., over past 200 years, average real return on stocks, 8%. On short-term govt bonds, 3%.
    0
  • 25.
    • Example: Suppose you are dividing your portfolio between two asset classes.
      • A diversified group of risky stocks: average return = 8%, standard dev. = 20%
      • A safe asset: return = 3%, standard dev. = 0%
    • The risk and return on the portfolio depends on the percentage of each asset class in the portfolio…
    0
  • 26.
    • Increasing the share of stocks in the portfolio increases the average return but also the risk.
    0
  • 27.
    • When deciding whether to buy a company’s stock, you compare the price of the shares to the value of the company.
      • If share price > value, the stock is overvalued .
      • If price < value, the stock is undervalued .
      • If price = value, the stock is fairly valued .
    0
  • 28. A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 3 : VALUING A SHARE OF STOCK
    • If you buy a share of AT&T stock today,
      • you will be able to sell it in 3 years for $30
      • you will receive a $1 dividend at the end of each of those 3 years
    • If the prevailing interest rate is 10%, what is the value of a share of AT&T stock today?
    0
  • 29.
    • Value of a share = PV of any dividends the stock will pay + PV of the price you get when you sell the share
    • Problem: When you buy the share, you don’t know what future dividends or prices will be.
    • One way to value a stock: fundamental analysis , the study of a company’s accounting statements and future prospects to determine its value
    0
  • 30. A C T I V E L E A R N I N G 4 : SHOW-OF-HANDS SURVEY
    • You have a brokerage account with Merrill Lynch. Your broker calls you with a hot tip about a stock: new information suggests that the company will be highly profitable. Should you buy stock in the company?
      • A. Yes
      • B. No
      • C. Not until you read the prospectus.
      • D. What’s a prospectus?
    0
  • 31.
    • Efficient Markets Hypothesis (EMH) : the theory that each asset price reflects all publicly available information about the value of the asset
    0
  • 32.
    • 1. Stock market is informationally efficient : Each stock price reflects all available information about the value of the company.
    • 2. Stock prices follow a random walk : A stock price only changes in response to new information (“news”) about the company’s value. News cannot be predicted, so stock price movements should be impossible to predict.
    • 3. It is impossible to systematically beat the market. By the time the news reaches you, mutual fund managers will have already acted on it.
    0
  • 33.
    • An index fund is a mutual fund that buys all the stocks in a given stock index.
    • An actively managed mutual fund aims to buy only the best stocks.
    • Actively managed funds have higher expenses than index funds.
    • EMH implies that returns on actively managed funds should not consistently exceed the returns on index funds.
    0
  • 34. 0 .550 1.272 12.5 10.3 S&P SmallCap 600 (index fund) Managed mid cap funds .535 1.458 10.9 8.1 S&P MidCap 400 (index fund) Managed mid cap funds .351 1.020 6.2% 5.9 S&P 500 (index fund) Managed large cap funds 2006 expense ratio 2001-2006 annualized return
  • 35.
    • Many believe that stock price movements are partly psychological:
      • J.M. Keynes: stock prices driven by “animal spirits,” “waves of pessimism and optimism”
      • Alan Greenspan: 1990s stock market boom due to “irrational exuberance”
    • Bubbles occur when speculators buy overvalued assets expecting prices to rise further.
    • The importance of departures from rational pricing is not known.
  • 36.
    • This chapter has introduced some of the basic tools people use when they make financial decisions.
    • The efficient markets hypothesis teaches that a stock price should reflect the company’s expected future profitability.
    • Fluctuations in the stock market have important macroeconomic implications, which we will study later in this course.
    0
  • 37.
    • The present value of any future sum is the amount that would be needed today, given prevailing interest rates, to produce that future sum.
    • Because of diminishing marginal utility of wealth, most people are risk-averse. Risk-averse people can manage risk with insurance, through diversification, and by choosing a portfolio with a lower risk and lower return.
    0
  • 38.
    • The value of an asset equals the present value of all payments its owner will receive. For a share of stock, these payments include dividends plus the final sale price.
    • According to the efficient markets hypothesis, financial markets are informationally efficient, a stock price always equals the market’s best guess of the firm’s value, and stock prices follow a random walk as new information becomes available.
    0
  • 39.
    • Some economists question the efficient markets hypothesis, and believe that irrational psychological factors also influence asset prices.
    0
  • 40.
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  • 41. CHAPTER 27 THE BASIC TOOLS OF FINANCE