Helen Keegan http://twitter.com/heloukee http://heloukee.wordpress.com Bringing the Social into the Sciences: Blurring Med...
Learning through Participation and Conversation <ul><li>Then </li></ul><ul><li>Now </li></ul>
 
Publicly Private and Privately Public Thelwall, M. (2008),  “ Fk yea I swear: cursing and gender in a corpus of MySpace pa...
Privacy, ethics, copyright, licensing
Enterprise and Public Engagement
 
 
 
International   Sharing CULTURES
AUTONOMY OWNERSHIP
 
F ORMS OF ASSESSMENT U NDERSTANDING LEARNING N ATURE OF KNOWLEDGE
Assessment as a social process
 
Sound Around You
PHOTO SLIDESHOW 1. Participatory Culture 2. Role fluidity 3. Careers 4. Disciplines
Cultural  Shift
 
Let ’ s carry on the conversation!  Go to  http://wp.me/pHOGY-4r http://twitter.com/heloukee Pecha Kucha ECE Conference 2011
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Bringing the Social into the Sciences

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My Pecha Kucha for the Education in a Changing Environment Conference, held at the University of Salford, UK on 6th July 2011

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  • A whistle-stop tour of some of the ways we are using social tools to learn and teach in a traditional science faculty
  • Demonstration vs. conversation Training vs. co-constructing knowledge Programming focused -&gt; increased emphasis on web literacies
  • Tools for learning and for developing a professionalised online presence (digital identity)
  • Invisible audiences Clashing contexts
  • Creating and sharing content on the web A generation who are used to getting everything for free
  • Using the web for Enterprise and Engagement GV – grew successful business in short space of time, now on powerlist BC – poster boy, great online presence
  • Left uni, having established his online presence Now working on a freelance basis writing and reviewing for technology companies Also, as an alumni, has kept links open with staff and writes targeted posts which act as learning resources for our current students Learning tool/ePortfolio becomes professional site
  • Left uni, having studied the MSc module in Social Media Now working as a technology and social media expert for a digital and web agency His uni site has developed into this personal professional site - published dissertation on UGC Learning tool/ePortfolio becomes professional site
  • Industry experts commenting on student blogs, connecting with learners as fellow professionals
  • Interesting to see how blogs are use by different learners. 2 examples here: 1 shows a bilingual blog which an international student set up as part of his course, which allowed him to communicate and collaborate with people in the UK and the Czech Republic 1 shows an example of CC licensing in action – many of our students now choose to publish their work openly, and their knowledge of forms of licensing and issues around IPR enables them to make informed choices about how they want to share their work.
  • Essentially, by getting the students to develop professionalised digital identities through a range of social media, students have increased ownership of their work and are empowered to become more autonomous learners by operating within and across academic and industry communities.
  • We also encourage our students to use their personal devices for capturing media for use in class – 21 st century show and tell In the project shown here, video engineering students are making short practice-based films using their mobile phones. This exercise challenges them to really think about content, developing their understanding of the characteristics of short form video. Their work is published openly on YouTube, giving them the opportunity to engage with communities beyond the classroom – creating open educational resources for others.
  • So we’ve looked at ways in which social tech are used for building and sharing knowledge – new paradigms which also influence our assessment practices. New forms of assessment allow our students to really think about their own learning and even the nature of knowledge. Students deal with reflection and subjectivity alongside traditional positivist paradigms. For instance, when assessing blogs students asked to question and claim for marks, using mini vivas which give them opportunity to deepen their understanding of the subject and their own learning.
  • We’ve also been experimenting with assessment as a social process. As web-based assessments are being marked, they are also shared through Twitter as a way to publicize student work – students have also been instrumental in creating music and devising playlists during the assessment process. The mix of spotify, soundcloud and twitter makes assessment a shared and enjoyable process between students and staff.
  • Twitter network Researchers, experts, industry practitioners Current and past students (sometimes future) All chatting together, sharing info and making connections Less about solitary research in the lab, more about getting out there, sharing ideas and learning from one another in Personal Learning Networks
  • This Acoustics research project aims to build a sound map of the world as part of a new study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. People across the world to are using their mobile phones to record 10-15 second clips from different sound environments, or ‘ soundscapes ’ from a family car journey to a busy shopping centre, then uploading them to a virtual map, along with their opinions of them and why they chose to record it. Recordings and responses are analysed by acoustic scientists and their findings are reported on the web. This Soundscape study could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers. In the past, Soundscape data would be recorded by researchers on dedicated equipment, but this is costly and time-consuming. By engaging the public in the research through contributing data using their mobile phones, we are able to get much more data (albeit messy)
  • So we have this blurring of boundaries in terms of Participation – learners producing educational content and sharing with others across the web Role – communities of inquiry where students and tutors work and learn together, connecting across networks Careers – Techie students becoming great online communicators, opening up their work to a large audience of researchers and practitioners, finding new forms of employment in the process Disciplinary culture – traditional boundaries are being broken down, as learners collaborate with others from outside their field, and develop new learning and communication practices which have traditionally belonged to humanities and health disciplines
  • Benefits outweigh risks, relationships enhanced and ongoing
  • Bringing the Social into the Sciences

    1. 1. Helen Keegan http://twitter.com/heloukee http://heloukee.wordpress.com Bringing the Social into the Sciences: Blurring Media Boundaries Pecha Kucha ECE Conference 2011
    2. 2. Learning through Participation and Conversation <ul><li>Then </li></ul><ul><li>Now </li></ul>
    3. 4. Publicly Private and Privately Public Thelwall, M. (2008), “ Fk yea I swear: cursing and gender in a corpus of MySpace pages ” Corpora , Vol. 3 No.1, pp.83-107
    4. 5. Privacy, ethics, copyright, licensing
    5. 6. Enterprise and Public Engagement
    6. 10. International Sharing CULTURES
    7. 11. AUTONOMY OWNERSHIP
    8. 13. F ORMS OF ASSESSMENT U NDERSTANDING LEARNING N ATURE OF KNOWLEDGE
    9. 14. Assessment as a social process
    10. 16. Sound Around You
    11. 17. PHOTO SLIDESHOW 1. Participatory Culture 2. Role fluidity 3. Careers 4. Disciplines
    12. 18. Cultural Shift
    13. 20. Let ’ s carry on the conversation! Go to http://wp.me/pHOGY-4r http://twitter.com/heloukee Pecha Kucha ECE Conference 2011

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