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Video Field Production Training

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Designed a workshop for students to videotape school events on and off campus.

Designed a workshop for students to videotape school events on and off campus.

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    Video Field Production Training Video Field Production Training Document Transcript

    • Video Field Production 1 Running head: Video Field Production Video Field Production Training ISTC 767 Fall 2009 Judy Ou & Paul Iwancio
    • Video Field Production 2 Instructional Need Students are hired (as apprentice professional videographers) to videotape lectures, events and interviews on campus. The student videographers often have little or no experience shooting video on location and the technical variables that they will encounter. They need mandatory training to learn about different aspects of videotaping in basic setup, composition, using a tripod, shooting angles and lighting. Audience Undergraduate college students, average age 18 to 28, with little or no experience videotaping on location. (These locations may be on or off campus.) Context The setting will be in a professional work environment on a public university campus. A mix of synchronous and asynchronous training will provide diverse experience training for learning the video taping process. We will develop instruction with online video tutorials and interactive tools such as wikis, YouTube and blogs. It is important to note that in these lessons we will not be teaching digital editing. That will be taught in future training. This training will be provided during regular work hours. Students will be paid for their time devoted to the training. Required Equipment 1. Digital video camera with firewire connection 2. Firewire cable 3. Camera tripod 4. Lighting kit-with 3 lights, stands and power cables 5. One microphone with XLR cable 6. Computer for editing & internet access for upload to Youtube Measurable Instructional Goals After receiving the training the students should be able to videotape with a camera on location and produce a professional grade video recording. Specifically, the students should be able to independently: 1. Set up a tripod and level it. 2. Attach a video camera to the tripod. 3. Identify all parts of the video camera. 4. Videotape a lecture or event on location. 5. Provide uniform lighting on the subject. 6. Connect a microphone to the camera, producing a clear 12db sound level. 7. Use rule of thirds composition and explain choice of framing. 8. Give constructive feedback of videos shot on location. Description of the completed project  Learning activities or teaching methods o Students will create a short video (5 minutes in length) to demonstrate all the components (set up, shooting angles and lighting). o Small group discussion and critiques.
    • Video Field Production 3 o Group project demonstration and critiques.  Assessment and evaluation methods o Students will take pre and post survey on how well they know about videotaping. o Intermittent feedback from the participants (observation). o Contributions to problem solving wiki will be reviewed. o Posted videos (2 of 5 minutes in length) will be assessed by peers and teacher with constructive feedback.  Timeline or sequence of activities/lessons: 4 days of lessons to learn video field production. The lessons will include hands-on segments, a project-based experience, and incorporate elements of social learning. Lesson Content Assessment Day 1 -Pre survey (10 minutes) -Pre Survey (80 min) -Introduction of the workshop (10 minutes) -Observation of students’ -Deliver 5 components to video production (50 minutes) progress Using a tripod Composition Shooting angles Lighting Sound -Questions? (10 minutes) -Make sure all students are ready to proceed for the project , add tutoring as needed -Provide URL for online resources Day 2 -Create a short video (30 minutes) -Teacher confirms the (60 min) -Upload video to YouTube or personal blog for critiquing. successful posting of the The students will choose a Web 2.0 application to post their videos video and then share the URL with instructor and fellow -Teacher assesses posted video classmates for feedback (20 minutes) productions (NOTE: This allows flexibility for students to use an application that they are familiar or comfortable with. It will still allows for feedback and user control.) -Questions? (10 minutes) Day 3 -Students will constructively critique each other’s video (50 -Peer assessment with ( 90 min) minutes) constructive critique -Guidelines will be given to the students for constructive -Teacher monitor students feedback. This includes for suggested questions and feedback respectful discourse (5 minutes) -Teacher reviews contribution -Contributions to wiki (discussion forum) focus on problem to the wiki solving discussion (30 minutes) -Questions? (5 minutes) Day 4 -Students shoot another video in the field (30 minutes) -Teacher assesses final video (100 min) -Final video is presented to the teacher for assessment (60 productions with rubric minutes) -Post survey -Wrap up (10 minutes) Post-Test -Q&A
    • Video Field Production 4 Instructional design methods used We will be using the Pebble-in-the-Pond method (Merrill 2002) to deliver our instruction to the undergraduate students. “Tell, Ask, Show and Do” are the components that will help students to create a flawless video production. We chose Merrill’s approach to our project because it is problem-centered instruction with component knowledge that must be learned and applied to complete the task. The problem to be solved in this project is how to shoot a video on independently with sufficient skills learned from the training program. The ripples emanating in Merrill’s Pebble-in-the-Pond are as follows: 1. The Whole Problem: “How do I shoot a video on location?” 2. Progressive Problems Identified: The series of problems for the student are: a. How do I setup a tripod? b. What is a good composition for a video shot? c. What are some optimal angles in videography? d. How do I improve lighting? e. How do I achieve the best sound quality? f. Can I critique my own and other fellow students’ videos? 3. Analyze the Problems: This is to determine the component knowledge the students need to know to complete the task. They will need to know how to setup a tripod, compose the video shot, choose an angle from the camera to the subject, provide adequate lighting, record comprehensible sound, and then critique their own and other student videos. 4. Determine Instructional Strategy: How to combine four modes of instructional interaction- Tell, Ask, Show, Do. Tell We will tell the students the process of identify the camera components and equipment, basic set up and other components for videotaping production. Ask We will ask the students to use what they learned from the training and relate to their own experiences. Show We will show the basic set up for video taping production. Students will demonstrate what they learned from the training. Do We will ask the students to demonstrate what they learned from the training and produce a 5 minutes in length video in the field on their own. 5. Content and Strategy: Content and strategy are adapted to the learning situation or product. In this case, we have chosen a mix of synchronous and asynchronous delivery with web 2.0 technologies also employed. 6. Production: The instructional product and materials are produced. We will not be physically producing the full instructional materials. Although, it is part of Merill’s steps, we will only specifying them. (For the purpose of this ISTC 767 proposed project)
    • Video Field Production 5 Principles of Instruction In Merrill’s first principles of instruction he notes a cycle of learning with these phases: 1) activation 2) demonstration 3) application 4) integration. For example, teaching how to use a tripod would follow this progression detailed below. Tripod set up: 1) Activation: The instructor would active their past experience by asking students to think about instances that they saw a video shot with and without using a tripod. The students will describe the effect of the video shoot(s). 2) Demonstration: The instructor will show a commonly used tripod, name the parts and set up the tripod in front of the students. The instructor will attach a video camera to a tripod, showing how to affix, secure and then remove the video camera. 3) Application: The students will take turns setting up the tripod that was demonstrated previously by the instructor. The instructor will monitor the students’ progress and coaching when necessary (scaffolding and formative evaluation). 4) Integration: The students will use the tripod in the field to shoot a video. Detailed Lesson Plan: Day 1 Materials Needed: Handouts (agenda, pre-survey, glossary, framing examples, parts of camera, illustration of sound level meter, project rubric). Tripods, video cameras, camera batteries, videotapes, light kits, microphones, microphone cables, computer with internet access, data projector, and tv monitor. Web Resources: http://www.umbc.edu/oit/newmedia/studio/digitalstories/audiolesson.html http://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/shooting_tips/  Administer pre-survey to students.  The instructor assesses the surveys. 1. The instructor will provide an overview agenda including the topics to be covered and other additional handouts-included in the appendix of this document. 2. The instructor will cover tripod set up as follows: The instructor will ask students to think about instances that they saw a video shot with and without using a tripod. The students will describe the effect of the video shoot(s). The instructor will show a commonly used tripod, name the parts and set up the tripod in front of the students. The instructor will attach a video camera to a tripod, showing how to affix, secure and then remove the video camera. The students will take turns
    • Video Field Production 6 setting up the tripod that was demonstrated previously by the instructor. The instructor will monitor the students’ progress and coaching when necessary 3. The instructor will introduce the “Rule of Thirds” (ROT) for video composition. To demonstrate the instructor will show an image and divide it into three equal sections vertically and then 3 equal sections horizontally (see handout for an example). The instructor will point out the aesthetic benefit of placing an item of interest at the intersection of these imaginary guiding lines. Students will find images on the web to illustrate the ROT and share with the rest of the class. 4. The instructor will describe the use of shooting angles, their implied meanings and effectiveness (natural feel). Tell the students that camera angles can convey nonverbal meaning. By looking down on a subject it is implied that the subject is inferior. When looking up at a subject, it is implied that the speaker or subject is an authority figure. By shooting from the side you avoid eye contact. If shooting head on you achieve eye contact and engagement. Students will try out angles with the video camera. 5. The instructor will describe the use of “3 point lighting”, backlighting, spotlighting and the effects of inadequate lighting. 3 point lighting uses: 1) A key light to provide most of the light on the subject. 2) The fill light, which is diffused, fills in any harsh shadows. 3) The backlight gives dimension for the subject by distinguishing it from the background. If students have too much backlight (e.g., from a bright window), it will cause the camera iris to shutdown and give inadequate light on the subject. Spotlighting is when extremely bright light falls on the front of the subject and washes them out in a glare. Students will experiment with lighting for the video camera, setting up some lights and trying to videotape a person in front of a bright window. 6. The instructor will show how to hook up a microphone to the camera and adjust for optimal sound level (i.e., -12 to 0 db with no clipping). Students will experiment with the microphone and the sound setting. The instructor will play examples of effective sound levels and contrast with inferior settings. These examples are available at this website: http://www.umbc.edu/oit/newmedia/studio/digitalstories/audiolesson.html 7. The instructor will ask students if there are any questions about the training and respond to them appropriately. Assessment: Students will be able to set up tripod, attach camera, connect microphone, set sound level, set up lighting as needed and start recording. Day 2 Materials Needed: Handout on how to post to youtube. Tripods, video cameras, camera batteries, videotapes, light kits, microphones, microphone cables, computer with internet access, data projector, and TV monitor.
    • Video Field Production 7 Web Resources: http://www.webvideozone.com/public/308.cfm & http://www.youtube.com & http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_O7iUiftbKU 1. The instructor will demonstrate the steps to uploading a video to YouTube or personal blog. Instructions are located here: http://www.webvideozone.com/public/308.cfm 2. Online video tutorial here: http://www.YouTube.com/watch?v=_O7iUiftbKU 3. The students will be given tripod, microphone and camcorder to produce a 2 to 5 minutes simple video recording of a fellow student giving a speech or poem. 4. The students will upload the video to the online viewing website. 5. The instructor will be available for questions to provide tutorial assistance. Assessment: Students will create a short video and post it to the web for online sharing. Day 3 Materials Needed: Handout: How to give a constructive critique. Computers with internet access, data projector. Web Resources: http://pbworks.com/ http://www.slideshare.net/lisayama/how-to-create-a-pbwiki-presentation http://www.slideshare.net/leviragedelavis/how-to-use-pbwiki-presentation 1. The instructor will give a handout (see attached/appendix item) with guidelines for constructive critique. (e.g., what do you like about the video and what if anything you would change to make it better?) 2. The students will constructively critique each other’s video production and use the rubric as a guideline. 3. The instructor will introduce the wiki page and the procedure to access and edit the page. Students will be encouraged to use the wiki as a discussion forum, focusing on problem-solving for the video production. The instructor will create a wiki page by following these instructions: http://www.slideshare.net/lisayama/how-to-create-a-pbwiki-presentation 4. Instructions for the students are here: http://www.slideshare.net/leviragedelavis/how-to-use-pbwiki-presentation 5. To achieve full participation on the wiki, the instructor will ask students to post information about their video production, problems encountered or even possible solutions. Students will be given 10 minutes during this class session to post content described above. This activity will take place immediately after giving the instructions to accessing and editing the wiki.
    • Video Field Production 8 6. The instructor will be available for questions and respond to developments on the wiki as necessary. Assessment: Students will constructively critique at least 2 other students’ videos. Day 4 Materials Needed for Handouts: Project rubric and post-survey. Tripods, video cameras, camera batteries, videotapes, light kits, microphones, microphone cables, computer with internet access, data projector, and tv monitor. Web Resources: http://www.pbwiki.com & http://www.YouTube.com 1. The instructor will review any topic previously covered that needs more attention. This will be determined by the feedback and questions from the wiki and voiced in the classroom. If the instructor does not have an immediate response, he/she will research for an appropriate response and post it to the wiki. 2. The instructor will give additional constructive feedback on the videos posted to youtube, especially any that received little or no effective feedback from fellow students. 3. The students will be asked to produce another 2 to 5 minutes video in the field. 4. The students will return to the class and screen their videos for the whole class. 5. The instructor will collect the video tapes for final assessment. This final assessment will guided by the rubric. 6. The instructor will deliver the post-survey to students at the end of the class for further assessment. Assessment: Students will produce a final video with acceptable to exemplary quality as defined by the rubric. Assessment: At the end of this sequence, the students will be able to: 1. Set up a tripod and level it with bubble indicator. 2. Attach and secure a camera. 3. Remove the camera and collapse and stow tripod in the bag. Role of instructional technology Wikis, YouTube and blogs will be used as instructional technology tools to demonstrate the quality of the video production, critiques of the production, experience and troubleshoot discussions.
    • Video Field Production 9 Research support for the use of technology Lave & Wenger (1991) point out that authentic participation in the community of practice is critical for increasing understanding. The students will be active members of a learning community and participating in the creation of videos by shooting with a video camcorder. Seddon & Biasutti (2009) found that “online tutoring and technology worked in tandem to facilitate learning skills that developed the participants abilities to plan, organize, monitor and assess their own competencies” (p. 548). This supports our decision to use the wiki as an online tutor system, as well as facilitating a community of practice. So et al. (2009) state that “use of videos is ideal for providing feedback, conducting Web-based peer assessments, improving the quality of mentoring and stimulating…” (p. 776). It is a constructive way of helping students to learn specific knowledge or skill by using video stimulation during the training. Clip images also help the students to recall and transfer the knowledge or skill when they apply toward a complex project.
    • Video Field Production 10 References Lave, J., and Wenger, E.(1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. Merrill, M. (2002). A pebble-in-the-pond model for instructional design. Performance Improvement, 41(7), 41-46. Seddon, F. and Biasutti, M. (2009). Evaluating a music e-learning resource: The participants’ perspective. Computers & Education 53(3) 541-549. So, W., Pow, J., & Hung, V. (2009). The interactive use of a video database in teacher education: creating a knowledge base for teaching through a learning community. Computers & Education, 53(3), 775-786. Retrie ved September 28, 2009 from ERIC database.
    • Video Field Production 11 Appendix I: Video Field Production Agenda Day One Hands on instruction and exercises Using a Tripod Composition Shooting Angles Lighting Sound Day Two Shoot a video and post it to YouTube Day Three How to constructively critique each other’s work How to access and contribute to the wiki Day Four Review and Final Assignment given
    • Video Field Production 12 Appendix II-Rubric Unacceptable (0 pts) Acceptable (3 pts) Exemplary (5 pts) Basic Setup Student fails to set up Student sets up Student sets up tripod and camera. tripod and camera tripod and camera with some without any assistance from the assistance from the instructor or fellow instructor or fellow students. students. Identify parts of Student can identify Student can identify Student can identify camera 0~2 essential parts of 3~5 essential parts essential 6 parts of the camcorder (i.e., of the camcorder the camcorder (i.e., power switch, focus (i.e., power switch, power switch, focus and tape focus and tape and tape compartment). compartment). compartment). Proper lighting Student video Student video Student video recording shows 0 to recording shows 25 recording shows 50 25% luminence light to 75% luminence to 100% luminence level on the subject, light level on the light level on the excessive backlight subject, some subject, no behind subject and backlight behind excessive backlight harsh shadows. subject and some behind subject and harsh shadows. no harsh shadows. Quality of audio Student video Student video Student video recording has -40 to recording has -30 to recording has -12 to -30 db gain with more -20 db gain with 0 db gain with no than 10 clipping spots. some clipping. clipping. Composition Student video Student video Student video recording has 50% or recording has 30% recording has 10% more headroom, headroom, shows headroom, shows shows no use of “rule some use of “rule of the use of “rule of of thirds” and no thirds” and some thirds” and natural natural viewing angle. unnatural viewing viewing angle. angles.
    • Video Field Production 13 Appendix III: Pre-survey Name:________________ Date: ______________ Workshop: Video Field Production Please circle Yes or No to the following questions: 1. Do you know how to operate a tripod? Yes No 2. Can you operate a video camcorder? Yes No 3. Do you know what the “Rule of Thirds” is? Yes No 4. Do you know how to adjust backlighting? Yes No 5. Can you connect a microphone to the camcorder? Yes No 6. Do you know how to upload a video to YouTube or Yes No blog? Question: What do you hope to get out of this workshop? ______________________________________________________________________
    • Video Field Production 14 Appendix IV: Post-survey Name:________________ Date: ______________ Workshop: Video Field Production Please circle Yes or No to the following questions: 1. Do you know how to operate a tripod? Yes No 2. Can you operate a video camcorder? Yes No 3. Do you know what the “Rule of Thirds” is? Yes No 4. Do you know how to adjust backlighting? Yes No 5. Can you connect a microphone to the camcorder? Yes No 6. Do you know how to upload a video to YouTube or Yes No blog? Questions: Did you feel the workshop was worthwhile to improve your skills? (If no, please explain why) ______________________________________________________________________ What was your favorite part of the workshop? ______________________________________________________________________ What do you suggest for improvement for future workshops? ______________________________________________________________________
    • Video Field Production 15 Appendix V: Supplemental Handouts Composition The difference between a good shot and a great shot is the composition. Anyone can go to their local park and get good shots of wildflowers, but a great videographer knows how to line up a perfect shot. Headroom When looking through your camera’s viewfinder, make sure your subject’s head is located near the top of the frame.Having too much empty space over someone’s head makes it seem like something is about to drop out of the sky on top of them. Head Room, Right Head Room, Wrong
    • Video Field Production 16 Look – Space When your interview subject is speaking, give them some room to look. If you’re standing to the right of the camera, have your subject on the left looking across the frame. Reverse this if you’re on the other side. Look Space, Right Look Space, Wrong
    • Video Field Production 17 Rule of Thirds A good setup for a photograph works just as well for video. Imagine two equally spaced lines running across the frame vertically and two running across horizontally dividing the frame into nine sections.Line up elements of your composition (e.g. the horizon) along the lines, and line up subjects at the intersection points. Doing this makes the image appear to have more life and energy than if you just plop something right smack in the center. Rule of Thirds Tripods There is little worse than a shaky video. It’s distracting, and in some cases, downright nauseating. Use a tripod. Don’t have one? Try leaning on or against something. Anything you can use to steady up your arm or the camera will dramatically increase the “viewability” of your recording. It’s one simple way to separate your work from the amateurs. Audio Good, clean, intelligible audio is arguably more important than perfect video. Viewers can forgive a few bad shots, but if they can’t understand what’s being said due to low volume, overpowering background music, or loud noises, they’re not How to read a sound meter and going to keep set appropriate levels: watching. Ideal sound levels will reach -20 to -10 as indicated on a level meter, such as the on on the left. Sound levels reaching over 0db and at 10db will produce distortion and/or clipping which will make the recording unintelligible. Sound levels set too low, at -50 to -60 will produces more noise than signal.
    • Video Field Production 18 Microphones Continued: Microphones are directional, which means they record audio from the direction that they are pointed. Keep this in mind when you’re interviewing someone. Point your microphone toward your subject … but away from loud noises such as traffic, construction, marching bands, screaming children, packs of wild dogs, etc. If you’re out and about and need to interview someone, but the current location is too noisy, don’t be afraid to ask them to move somewhere else. Taking a moment to consider what you hear around you will mean the difference between an interview that is good enough for broadcast and one that languishes in disrepute. Parts of the camcorder:
    • Video Field Production 19 Appendix VI-Glossary Video Production Glossary Aperture: opening on the lens through which light enters camera Aspect ratio: size relationship between height and width of the camera rectangle Audio level: the quantitative reading of sound in decibels (db) Audio signal: the microphone converts sound waves into this form of electrical energy Camera angle: the camera's position in relation to the shot--eyelevel, high, low, oblique Camera shot: what the camera is focused on, whether live or videotaping Crew: people behind camera Cut: instantaneous change from one scene to another Depth of field: distance between nearest and farthest objects in the camera frame Dialogue: the words in a script that are spoken, by on-screen or off-screen characters Dissolve: one scene slowly fades while the next slowly appears in its place Dolly: to move camera(and tripod) , along side, closer to or away from subject Dynamic microphone: most common type of microphone used in our studio Editing: selection and arrangement of video or film footage into final product Fade: camera transition that gradually changes lighting between normal and black; used to end one sequence and open another Focal length: lens measurement that indicates size of image the lens creates Footage: scenes of a video you shoot Frame: outer boundary of what camera sees Gain: sound level or volume of what is being recorded by camcorder Iris: adjustable device that controls amount of light entering lens Jump cut: editing together of two similar shots of same person or action, with subject in slightly different position in each shot, so subject appears to abruptly move or jump from one part of screen to another Lead room: space in front of main object, so camera "leads" it into the empty space Light: general term for any source of illumination; the light source is called a "lamp," not a light bulb. Lux: measurement used to indicate camera’s sensitivity to light Omnidirectional microphone: a microphone that picks up sound from all sides, including the rear/back of the microphone Pan: move camera horizontally Pickup pattern: directions where microphone receives sound from its surroundings Rule of Thirds: composing the camera shot so the most important elements are one third of the way in from any side Scene: each change of time or setting in a script Screen direction: direction of movement on screen in relation to camera Segment: each different topic content portion of news broadcast; see also Scene Selective focusing: focus one object in frame so that other objects are out of focus Sequence: A series of shots compiled together Shot: see Camera shot Shutter: mechanical or electronic device that controls amount of time a frame is exposed to light
    • Video Field Production 20 Shutter speed: amount of time shutter is open to expose film or tape to light Storyboards: thumbnail sketches of important scenes for video or film script Swish pan: fast-moving pan that creates intentionally blurry image Synopsis: a summary of the video story that includes the plot—beginning, middle, end—along with character profiles and character movements Talent: people in front of camera, also called anchors or reporters Telephoto: long focal length lens that creates large images of distant objects Tilt: move camera vertically Track: move camera parallel to moving subject Transition: script indication of the camera change from one scene/segment to another Unidirectional microphone: sound pickup at top, so must be pointed directly at source Videography: art or process of recording visual images and sound on videotape Voiceover VO: when the speaker/narrator is heard but not seen on camera White balance: procedure camcorder performs to make sure colors look normal under various lighting conditions Zoom: lens that can change focal lengths to widen or narrow field of view; transition that changes camera shot closer to or farther away from subject
    • Video Field Production 21 Appendix VII-Critique Guidelines  Constructive Critiques by Paul Iwancio On giving criticism:  Open with a compliment. Find something positive to say about the work. Everyone is at a different place in their development and needs to be supported.  Ask questions about the work.  Do offer suggestions for improvement instead of just saying "it’s not good”.  Open suggestions with the qualifier “If it were my piece, I would…”  NEVER slam or destroy someone’s work. Every product/creation is a risk and should be treated with respect. On receiving criticism:  Listen, listen, listen!  It's fine to disagree with someone (feeling he/she doesn't understand your creation) but if you hear the same comment repeatedly about your work, listen to that. It may need some additional work.  You are welcome to ask questions about your own work.  If a critique isn’t clear, ask the critiquer to clarify.  If you don't agree with anything anybody says, then fine. Be polite and respectful of the comments.  You may receive what seems to be an avalanche of different comments on your work. Remember, in the end, it's still your product and you can take or leave the suggestions made to change your work. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The bottom line is RESPECT. Respect for the work, the producer and respect for the listeners and critiquers. Have RESPECT for every presenter, respect for everyone's time, respect for your classmates and the moderator. Be polite and considerate. Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated. Hurtful language is not tolerated. Help us keep a positive, supportive atmosphere as we try to produce better work and nourish our community of learners.
    • Video Field Production 22 Appendix VIII-Instruction for YouTube  These instructions are from www.YouTube.com Uploading a video to YouTube Once you've finished editing your video, made sure it's less than 10 minutes, smaller than 2GB in size, and in an acceptable format, you're ready to upload it.  Click the button in the upper-right-hand corner of any YouTube page.  Click the "Browse" button to browse for the video file you'd like to upload to our site. Select the file you want to upload.  Click the 'Upload Video' button to start the uploading process.  As the video file is uploading, enter as much information about your video as possible in the relevant fields (including Title, Description, Tags, and Category). You're not required to provide specific information, but the more information you include, the easier it is for users to find your video!  Click the 'Save changes' button to save the updates you've made to the video file. It can take from a couple minutes to an hour for your video to upload to YouTube. If you're receiving an error with your Upload, you might want to make sure you're attempting to upload a file that's recognized by YouTube. YouTube accepts video files from most digital cameras and camcorders, and cell phones in the .AVI, .MOV, .WMV, and .MPG file formats. Please note: your video must meet our uploading requirements: no larger than 2GB and no more than 10 minutes in length. If your video does not meet these requirements you will need to re-edit the video file on your computer then upload the new file to our site. Getting Started: How to upload Once you've finished editing your video, made sure it's less than 10 minutes, smaller than 2GB in size, and in an acceptable format, you're ready to upload it.  Click the button in the upper-right-hand corner of any YouTube page.  Click the "Browse" button to browse for the video file you'd like to upload to our site. Select the file you want to upload.  Click the 'Upload Video' button to start the uploading process.  As the video file is uploading, enter as much information about your video as possible in the relevant fields (including Title, Description, Tags, and Category). You're not required to provide specific information, but the more information you include, the easier it is for users to find your video!  Click the 'Save changes' button to save the updates you've made to the video file. It can take from a couple minutes to an hour for your video to upload to YouTube. If you're receiving an error with your Upload, you might want to make sure you're attempting to upload a file that's recognized by YouTube. YouTube accepts video files from most digital cameras and camcorders, and cell phones in the .AVI, .MOV, .WMV, and .MPG file formats.
    • Video Field Production 23 Please note: your video must meet our uploading requirements: no larger than 2GB and no more than 10 minutes in length. If your video does not meet these requirements you will need to re-edit the video file on your computer then upload the new file to our site.