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Word Up! Vocabulary Instruction in the 21st Century Classroom
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Word Up! Vocabulary Instruction in the 21st Century Classroom

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This is my presentation to accompany my (one day) Tier 2 and Tier 3 Hello Literacy workshop on vocabulary instruction. Perfect for Common Core, especially if your school is implementing a school-wide …

This is my presentation to accompany my (one day) Tier 2 and Tier 3 Hello Literacy workshop on vocabulary instruction. Perfect for Common Core, especially if your school is implementing a school-wide vocabulary instruction focus. This workshop includes the work of Marzano, the 6-Step Process, Vocabulary Notebooks, the work of Beck & McKeown, and the creation of Text Talk lessons.

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  • 1. Word Up! Vocabulary Instruction in the 21st Century Classroom by Hello Literacy
  • 2. Where in the day could word learning occur?
  • 3. Receptive Vocabulary (in) & Expressive Vocabulary (out)
  • 4. “The difference in the number of words known by students with poor vocabularies versus students with rich vocabularies is extensive, grows over time, and becomes apparent early.” (Baker, Simmons & Kameemui, Big IDEAS, University of Oregon)
  • 5. “The extent of oral language is highly correlated with later reading proficiency.” (Bishop &Adams, 1990; Butler, Marsh, Sheppard & Sheppard, 1985; Pikulski & Tobin, 1989; Share, Jorm, MacLean & Matthews, 1984)
  • 6. “Some children decode words fluently and still have reading comprehension problems that seem to stem from language comprehension problems.” (Oakhill, Cain & Yuill, 1998; Yuill & Parkin, 1986)
  • 7. “We use words to think; the more words we know, the finer our understanding is about the world.” (Stahl, 1999)
  • 8. “Comprehension of a text depends crucially on knowledge of specific words that may not be familiar to some students.” (Nagy, 1998)
  • 9. Now What? Directions: For each word, write a sentence and use the word correctly in the sentence. 1. epiphenomenal: having the character of or relating to an epiphenomenon ________________________________________________________ 2. kern: to form or set (as a crop of fruit) ________________________________________________________ 3: stative: expressing a bodily or mental state ________________________________________________________
  • 10. “Definitions, as an instructional device have substantial weaknesses and limitations. Definitions do not teach you how to use a new word and do not effectively convey concepts. Think of it this way: Why isn’t a glossary of biological terms an adequate substitute for a biology textbook?” (Nagy, 1989) “…thus knowing a word cannot be identified with knowing a definition.” (Nagy & Scott, 2000)
  • 11. steps Marzano’s
  • 12. • All these steps in 1 day (5-10 minutes) • Done IN a content area notebook, mixed in with other content area notes • 4 point rubric of understanding • These steps done over several days. • Done outside the notebook • In pairs, groups, at centers, etc. • 4 point rubric of understanding
  • 13. www.kaganonline.com Quiz Quiz trade A Kagan “Structure” A “Game”
  • 14. The Text-Talk Lesson 30 Minutes Read-Aloud (15 minutes) Word Play (15 minutes)
  • 15. A Demonstration Lesson
  • 16. Create “student friendly” definitions • Ask yourself “When do I use this word?” • Use everyday language to explain the meaning. • Keep focused on the central meaning. • Try to include something, someone, or describes in your explanation to clarify how the word is used. Create and use instructional contexts • Contextual meaning for the word that are from the teacher, in a context other than the book. • Instructional contexts are used along with (not • instead of) “student friendly.” Active Engagement & Interaction • It is essential that students begin using a new word immediately, meaningfully, and in multiple contexts. • Examples are: Word Associations, Have You Ever…?, Applause! Applause! , Idea Completions or Open-Ends like “When might…How might…Why might…”
  • 17. Comparing Two Target Words • The sidewalk: paved or amazing? • Taking a walk to look for shells: amazing or exploring? • Michael Phelps 25 gold medals: amazing or paved? Using All Target Words Together
  • 18. Criteria for Selecting Tier 2 Words: Select words are most necessary for comprehension Choose words that can be: • Connected to what students know • Explained with words students know • Will be useful and interesting to students
  • 19. UTAH FIRST TEXT TALk LESSONs UTAH FIRST SUPPLEMENT BUNDLE
  • 20. 1. http://turangawaewae.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/flickr-words.jpg 2. http://www.roebuck.herts.sch.uk/pupil-premium/our-school/the-school-day/ 3. http://www.anchorhocking.com/prodd_3586_cat_18_tiered_platters.html 4. Clipart by Melonheadz 5. http://depositphotos.com/1337840/stock-photo-Water-splashing.html Photo Credits More Vocabulary Resources www.helloliteracy.blogspot.com