Helix High School: STEM

  • 7,993 views
Uploaded on

proposal for Charter School for East Baton Rouge Parish Schools

proposal for Charter School for East Baton Rouge Parish Schools

More in: Education , Spiritual
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
7,993
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
56
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...........................................................................................................3 Mission, Academic Philosophy, and Values.............................................................................................3 Structure, Leadership, and Governance..................................................................................................4 Short- and Long-term Goals....................................................................................................................5 Research-Base......................................................................................................................................11 Model Appropriateness..........................................................................................................................11 Core Values about Teaching and Learning............................................................................................12 MISSION AND VISION ................................................................................................................................................13 Mission and Academic Philosophy........................................................................................................13 Target Population...................................................................................................................................16 Enrollment Projection Chart...................................................................................................................19 EDUCATION PROGRAM........................................................................................................20 Educational Philosophy, Curriculum, and Instruction.............................................................................20 Students with Exceptionalities...............................................................................................................29 Student Evaluation.................................................................................................................................36 Professional Development.....................................................................................................................41 Student Recruitment, Enrollment, and Admissions...............................................................................43 School Climate and Culture...................................................................................................................45 Parent and Community Engagement.....................................................................................................48 GOVERNANCE, LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT..........................................................51 Governance...........................................................................................................................................51 School Leadership and Personnel Management...................................................................................57 Employment...........................................................................................................................................58 Operational Management......................................................................................................................60 FACILITIES AND FINANCE...................................................................................................62 Facilities ................................................................................................................................................62 Finance..................................................................................................................................................63 APPENDICES.........................................................................................................................67 Appendix 1 Facilities Floorplan............................................................................................................67 Appendix 2 Roster of Key Contacts.....................................................................................................68 Appendix 3 Board of Directors Résumés.............................................................................................70 Appendix 4 Helix By-laws....................................................................................................................88 Appendix 5 Public Records Policy.....................................................................................................101 Appendix 6 Compliance with Code of Ethics ....................................................................................102 Appendix 7 Enrollment Projection Chart ...........................................................................................111 Appendix 8 Student Enrollment Policy ..............................................................................................112 Appendix 9 Staffing Chart .................................................................................................................119 Appendix 10 Personnel Policy.............................................................................................................120 Appendix 11 Student Discipline Policy ................................................................................................126 Appendix 12 Job Descriptions.............................................................................................................135 Appendix 13 Facilities Information.......................................................................................................145 Appendix 14 Insurance Policy Quote...................................................................................................147 Appendix 15 Emergency Response Plan ...........................................................................................149 Appendix 16 Homeless Student Policy................................................................................................190 Appendix 17 Strategic Achievement Plan............................................................................................192 Appendix 18 Start-up Plan...................................................................................................................193 Appendix 19 Parent Complaint Policy.................................................................................................194 Appendix 20 Budget ...........................................................................................................................196 Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 2 of 195
  • 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Mission, Academic Philosophy, and Values The mission of Helix High School: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) is to provide the greater Baton Rouge region with a student-centered learning place that is a pathway to successful postsecondary placement, and ultimately, to success in the STEM industries. The goal of the high school is to develop students who will learn continuously as our economies and communities change; in essence, to prepare students for cutting edge careers in the STEM fields. The following beliefs have guided the design of the high school and will guide its operation once approved: (1) all students can learn; (2) students rise to the expectations that adults have of them; (3) students must have a voice in determining how they learn; (4) students have a right to expect and receive high-quality, engaging educational opportunities. The philosophy behind the design of Helix High School: STEM has emerged largely as a response to changing economic indicators in the region. Agricultural, manufacturing, and traditional service sectors are being replaced with a knowledge sector that requires independent, responsible decision-makers who can rise to the challenge of new and unexpected situations. To successfully prepare adolescents to become such individuals in the 21st century requires a school environment that is built upon a platform centered on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). The basic components of ICT are: (1) finding out information; (2) developing and implementing ideas; (3) exchanging and sharing information; and (4) reviewing, modifying, and evaluating work in process.1 While a strong mastery of ICT and content-specific goals are critical to placing digitally-literate students in successful organizations, so is the mastery of “soft skills”2 that will allow them to compete in todayʼs global economy. Examples include decision-making, independent thinking, critical thinking, motivated life-long learning, and problem solving. These skills will be the core expertise with which students will graduate from Helix High School: STEM; just as important is their understanding of the use of technology as a tool for 21st learning and teaching. Technology is essential to the success of our communities—locally, regionally, nationally, and globally. The collection of 21st century skills developed in the high school, along with Helix High School: STEMʼs collaboration with Louisiana State University, will give students a strong advantage in post-secondary coursework, as well as post-secondary career placements. From the mission and the philosophy came the schoolʼs design principles, which will permeate every aspect of academic life at the school for students, teachers, staff, and school leadership. These principles are as follows: personalization, technology integration, college readiness, and adult-world connections. Additionally, Helix High School: STEM will adopt the early college school model to provide a supporting learning environment that incorporates effective instructional and structural practices3. The four core principals of early college high schools are as follows: (1) a commitment to serving students underrepresented in higher 1 "Sun ICT Solutions for Schools: 21st Centure Learning on World-Class ICT Solutions." 2007. Sun Microsystems. <http://uk.sun.com/servicessolutions/industries/education/schools/pdf/schools_ICT_Solution_DSv3.pdf>. 2 Marquit, Miranda. "Increase the Chances of Finding a Job in This Recession by Focusing on Soft Skills." 29 July 2009. AllBusiness.com. 29 July 2009 <http://www.allbusiness.com/labor-employment/human-resources-personnel/12512301-1.html>. 3 Early College High School Initiative Core Principals (2008) [on-line]. Available at: http://www.earlycolleges.org/Downloads/ECHSICorePrin.pdf Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 3 of 195
  • 3. education; (2) early college high schools are created and sustained by a local education agency, a higher education institution, and the community; all of whom are jointly accountable for student success; (3) early college high schools and their higher education partners and community jointly develop an integrated academic program so all students earn one to two years of transferable college credit leading to college completion; (4) early college schools engage all students in a comprehensive support system that develops academic and social skills as well as the behaviors and conditions necessary for college completion; and (5) early college schools and their higher education and community partners work with intermediaries to create conditions and advocate for supportive policies that advance the early college movement. Following the early college high school model, Helix High School: STEM will be a small school. If approved, the first class of 125 freshmen will begin in July 2010. In July 2011, they will progress to sophomores, and a new freshman class will enter. The enrollment at the school will proceed in this manner until it reaches full enrollment, with the first cohort graduating in spring 2014. Alignment to East Baton Rouge Parish School's Mission and Vision Successful charter schools pride themselves on a mutually beneficial relationship with their authorizing district. With this in mind, the proposed school is well aligned to East Baton Rouge Parish School's Mission and Vision. Helix High School: STEM is dedicated to preparing students for engagement in higher education and success in local industries. This commitment compliments East Baton Rouge Parish School System's Vision to ensure students will graduate with the knowledge, skills and values necessary to become active and successful members of a dynamic learning community. The proposed school also seeks to serve students through personalization, technology-infusion, project-based learning, and adult-world connections. This matches EBR's Mission to educate all students to their maximum potential in a caring, rigorous and safe environment. Structure, Leadership, and Governance The Helix Board is well-positioned to serve as the governing board for the proposed school. Members include representatives from industry and content specialties, the non-profit community, education reform organizations, and community-based organizations. Diversity is also reflected along the lines of gender, race, ethnicity, and socio-economic background. The Helix Board will include parental representation from Helix High School: STEM upon opening of the proposed school. Helix High School: STEM will be led by the Executive Director, Dr. Brian J. Dixon, who reports directly to the Helix Board. The Executive Director will oversee the principal, who will supervise faculty and staff at the school. Helix High School: STEM will benefit from a number of organizational partnerships to ensure the successful design, launch, and management of the school. From the start of the design process, the school was supported by BP America (BP), bringing expertise in current and future industry to the design of the school. A team of educational experts from across the nation were invited by a local educational organization to participate in the design of the school. Efforts have also been made to partner with regional institutions of higher learning, including Louisiana State University, Southern University, and Baton Rouge Regional High Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 4 of 195
  • 4. School. Partnerships with these institutions are essential in preparing students for the rigors of academic success moving forward. The Helix Board has recognized the need to consult with experts in diverse fields to proactively support students. These fields include financial management, curriculum development, teacher support and training, and pursuing philanthropic partnerships. At this early stage, several organizations have been of tremendous assistance in preparing the application for the proposed schools. Upon approval, the Helix Board will review these relationships, and seek to formalize agreements that are in the best interest of the students. Examples of organizations who have provided support in their specific area of expertise include Revolution Learning, an educational incubator for innovative learning tools and schools; Advance Innovative Education, who spearheaded the design of the school; and 4th Sector Solutions, a charter school focused business management organization. Moving forward, the Executive Director in collaboration with the Helix Board will continue to reach out to organizations to support the design, implementation, and daily operations of the school. Examples of these burgeoning partnerships include technology (Apple, Microsoft, and Qualcomm), facilities (Downtown Development District), and food services (Revolution Foods). Short- and Long-term Goals Meeting the academic and operational goals of Helix High School: STEM will ensure the school positive standing in public education. The following goals have been set with modesty in mind, building upon success year after year. These realistic goals will help ensure an effective partnership with the district, parents, and other stakeholders as Helix Schools seeks to meet these goals and criteria for measuring academic viability. The Helix Board of Directors has established quality goals for academic and operational viability. The goals and criteria for assessment appear in the Tables below: Criterion: Attendance Students regularly come to school on time: ! Year 1: Tardiness < 15%, ADA = 90% ! Year 2: Tardiness < 12%, ADA = 91% ! Year 3: Tardiness < 10%, ADA = 92% ! Year 4: Tardiness < 8%, ADA = 93% ! Year 5: Tardiness < 5%, ADA = 95% Criterion: State Assessments Students show comprehension of Louisiana State Standards: ! Year 1: Freshmen: > 50% score “Basic” or above on iLeap ! Year 2: Freshmen: > 53% score “Basic” or above on iLeap Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 5 of 195
  • 5. Sophomore > 70% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Math, English) s: ! Year 3: Freshmen: > 55% score “Basic” or above on iLeap Sophomore > 73% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Math, English) s: Juniors: > 70% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Science, Social Studies) ! Year 4: Freshmen: > 60% score “Basic” or above on iLeap Sophomore > 77% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Math, English) s: Juniors: > 75% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Science, Social Studies) Seniors: > 90% score on Capstone Project > 90 % on-time graduation ! Year 5: Freshmen: > 65% score “Basic” or above on iLeap Sophomore > 77% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Math, English) s: Juniors: > 78% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Science, Social Studies) Seniors: > 90% score on Capstone Project > 90% on-time graduation Criterion: Benchmarking Students indicate growth among the following assessments: Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA), End-of-Course Assessments, and Presentations of Learning (POLs). Year NWEA End-of-Course Exam POLs 1 Set Benchmark Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% 2 10 point gain Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% 3 8 point gain Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% 4 5 point gain Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% 5 3 point gain Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% Criterion: Promotion There is steady growth in percentage of students who enter a grade in year one and are promoted to the next grade in year two. ! Year 1: Freshmen: 75+% ! Year 2: Freshmen: 78+% Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 6 of 195
  • 6. Sophomore 75+% ! Year 3: s: Freshmen: 80+% Sophomore 80+% s: Juniors: 80+% ! Year 4: Freshmen: 82+% Sophomore 80+% s: Juniors: 85+% ! Year 5 Freshmen: 85+% Sophomore 85+% s: Juniors: 90+% Criterion: Teacher Retention The school retains teachers so there is little attrition, and little disruption in advisor/advisee process. ! Year 1: Retention = 70+ % ! Year 2: Retention = 75+ % ! Year 3: Retention = 80+ % ! Year 4: Retention = 85+ % ! Year 5 Retention = 90+ % Criterion: Parent Involvement The school regularly engages parents/families as evidenced by the following data: (a) parent attendance at quarterly benchmarking conferences; (b) completion of two volunteer hours monthly; (c) attendance of parents at sub-committee meetings (led by a parent who serves on Helix Board); and (d) completion of two home visits a year. . Year 1 (a) = > 50% (b) = > 25% (c) = > 10% (d) = > 50% Year 2 (a) = > 60% (b) = > 35% (c) = > 20% (d) = > 60% Year 3 (a) = > 70% (b) = > 40% (c) = > 30% (d) = > 65% Year 4 (a) = > 80% (b) = > 45% (c) = > 40% (d) = > 70% Year 5 (a) = > 80% (b) = > 50% (c) = > 50% (d) = > 75% Criterion: Stakeholder Satisfaction The school provides a voice to its students, parents, families, teachers, staff, volunteers, and industry and community partners to receive guidance about the quality of the schoolʼs services through surveys that are administered in the 2nd and 4th quarters. Surveys have a scale of 0 – 3, where 0 represents “extremely dissatisfied,” and 3 represents “extremely satisfied.” ! Q2 survey averages will equal 1.5 or higher each year ! Q4 survey averages will equal 2.5 or higher each year Criterion: Financial Reporting The school submits all financial reporting in a timely and accurate manner: ! Preliminary annual budget, due on or before July 1 Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 7 of 195
  • 7. ! First interim financial report for July through October, due December 15 ! Second interim financial report for July through January 21, due March 15 ! Unaudited actual financial report for July through June 30, due September 15 ! Audited report for prior fiscal year, due December 15 Criterion: Financial Stability The school demonstrates financial stability and sustainability: ! Positive Cash Flow: Cash received exceeds cash expended ! Net Operating Surplus: Operating revenues are greater than operating expenses in the current fiscal year ! Positive Ending Fund Balance: Assets are greater than liabilities ! Adequate Reserve for Economic Uncertainty: Ending fund balance is at least 3% of the current yearʼs expense budget or $50,000, whichever is greater ! Audit Results: Any audit findings are appropriately addressed in a timely manner ! Solvency: Available cash is sufficient to satisfy current liabilities ! Enrollment and ADA: Student enrollment is stable and the Average Daily Attendance factor is maximized to increase apportionment funding Criterion: Financial Management The school demonstrates effective financial management: ! Restricted Funding: Revenues from restricted resources are accounted for separately, and appropriate expenses are being charged according to funding restrictions from the granting agency ! Accounting Software: Accounting systems adequately report financial information by function and source to charter school management, Board of Directors, and reporting agencies in required forms ! Safeguarding of Assets: Internal control procedures are implemented to protect assets of the charter school and comply with accounting procedures adequate to prevent misuse of charter school funds ! Attendance Accounting: Student attendance is accurately tracked and reported in conformity with state laws and reporting requirements ! Required Funding Documentation: Supplemental funding applications, plans, claims, and required documentation are filed with the funding agency by the specified deadline ! Liabilities: Loans, debts, and outstanding obligations are properly accounted for and paid in a timely manner, as required by legal agreements Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 8 of 195
  • 8. ! Enrollment and ADA: Projections are based on the average or adjusted actual enrollment and ADA. Any growth projections are based on historical experience or planned operational changes ! Budget Development: The staff, management and Board of Directors are involved in the budget development ! Board Oversight: The management and Board of Directors regularly review the budget in comparison to actual revenue and expenditures and, as new information becomes available, make necessary adjustments to the budget ! Adjusted Budgets: Current fiscal yearʼs operating budget is updated for new revenue received and new expenses incurred Criterion: Governance The school demonstrates effective governance and organizational leadership: ! The governance board bylaws reflect the governance processes described in the charter. They have reasonable terms regarding financial management, personnel decisions, and oversight of educational program and school safety ! Board meetings occur on a regular basis, comply with all aspects of the Brown Act, provide an opportunity for public comment, and are recorded in written minutes ! The Board adheres to reasonable written conflict of interest policies and makes decisions free from conflict of interest by disqualifying any Board member from voting on a particular matter that would materially affect him or her ! The Board adopts reasonable written policies to resolve internal and external conflicts and complaints ! The Board maintains clearly written minutes that indicate attendance and a general description of all matters proposed, discussed, and/or decided. Minutes indicate that the board regularly achieves a quorum and is able to progress through issues from one meeting to the next ! The board implements an accountability process for the school leader ! The board establishes regular opportunities for stakeholders to address administration and board (measured by parent meetings, surveys, etc.) ! Board or school administration provides regular public reports on schoolʼs progress towards achieving its goals to school community ! Board and school administration foster a school culture conducive to student learning and staff professional growth (as measured by perception data) Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 9 of 195
  • 9. Criterion: Operations The school demonstrates effective management of operations: ! Operational Management ! Employment Policies: Employee policies are written and consistent with the charter and applicable law ! Employee Records: Employee records are complete and kept in a manner consistent with the law and employee policies ! Risk Management: Adequate insurance is obtained to provide appropriate levels of risk management ! Health and Safety ! Safety Plan: The school has an up-to-date school safety plan ! Certificate of Occupancy: The school has a current Certificate of Occupancy, if it is located on non-district facilities ! Admissions Policy and Practices ! Policy: The school has a written admissions policy consistent with the law and its charter ! Practices: The admissions policy is implemented with fidelity to charter petition ! Student Discipline ! Policy: The school adheres to written discipline policy that is consistent with the law and the charter ! Records: The school maintains appropriate student discipline records ! Parent Access ! The school adopts policies that address parent access in a manner that is consistent with the law and the charter Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 10 of 195
  • 10. Research-Base For decades, scholars have asserted that experience and how it is critically reflected upon is the core of all learning.4 This assertion refutes the primary reliance upon lecture-based instructional methods in the traditional education system and confirms the need for alternative school models to successfully prepare students for life in the 21st century. Helix High School: STEM will use an interdisciplinary curriculum to link content and modes of inquiry normally associated with more than one scholarly discipline.5 In contrast to the traditional, subject-centered structure of traditional secondary schools in the United States, an interdisciplinary approach posits a group of teachers with content or discipline specialties working together to integrate content standards and objectives around themes or projects to achieve more relevant, student-centered learning than would occur with traditional subject–specific curriculum and instruction.6 A fundamental component of an interdisciplinary approach is project-based inquiry learning. Studies show that this method boosts student performance and attitude toward learning, particularly in science and math, and in subjects that demand verbal and written communication.7 Moreover, inquiry enables a confluence of skills, knowledge, and dispositions in a way that demands a connection to real life. Seeking solutions to authentic and personally meaningful questions, students engage in inquiry through extended investigation, questioning, collaboration, and the use of technology. Todayʼs students face technology opportunities that previous generations could only imagine. The acceleration of technology has allowed for rapid dissemination of new ideas and applications. Meaningful integration in the classroom of technology enhances learning experiences and provides a tool for exploring virtual solutions to problems before implementing methods of solutions in real life.8 When individuals understand how to use technology this way, it becomes a tool that is safer and more cost-effective means to solving problems. Model Appropriateness Serving at-risk students is central to our mandate and mission. Helix High School: STEM will be a personalized learning environment that is engaging to students through project-based delivery of the curriculum. Research of the interdisciplinary approach to education in high at- risk student populations has led to positive academic achievement.9 These outcomes include: ! Improved student academic achievement ! Accelerated student academic achievement of low-income, ethnic and minority 4 Newsome, Linda Ann, George W. Wardlow and Donald M. Johnson. "Effects Of Lecture Versus Experiential Teaching Method On Cognitive Achievement, Retention, And Attitude Among High School Agriscience Students." 2005. National AAAE Research Conference. <http://aaae.okstate.edu/proceedings/2005/Articles/146.pdf>. 5 Vars, G. F. Interdisciplinary Teaching: Why and How. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association, 1993. 6 Jackson, A. and G. A. Davis. Turning Points 2000: Educating Adolescents in the 21st Century. New York: Teachers College Press, 2000. 7 Jarrett, D. Inquiry Strategies for Science and Mathematics Learning. 1997. Portland, OR: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. 8 Newby, T., Stepich, D. Lehman, J. & Russell, J. Educational technology for teaching and learning. (3rd ed). 2006. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, Merril, Prentice Hall. 9 Ogle, Donna M. (1997). Critical Issue: Rethinking Learning for Students at Risk. North Central Regional Educational Laboratory [On-line]. Available: http://ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/students/atrisk/at700.htm Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 11 of 195
  • 11. students ! Student academic engagement ! Improved student self-esteem and self-concept ! Reduced student behavior issues In schools with similar demographics, where teams of teachers cooperatively implemented interdisciplinary curriculum and instructional practices, such as thematic project-based learning and inquiry learning, studies have found higher student academic achievement as compared to schools with traditional subject-centered curriculum and instructional practices. 10 Other research has revealed that equity issues were improved when teams of teachers used practices from multiple disciplines in schools.11 Students from low- income backgrounds achieved higher academic gains in schools where teachers were experienced in collectively using such practices. Beyond student academic achievement, researchers note other positive student outcomes related to teaching teams engaged in interdisciplinary approaches, including increased engagement, improved self-esteem and self-concept, and decreased negative behavior.12 Student motivation increases as rote learning and content coverage is de-emphasized and students are provided choice. Student learning in classrooms with an interdisciplinary approach emulates learning in natural situations such as apprenticeships. Research shows that technology integration offers at-risk students a differentiated and innovative learning experience that will improve their motivation and attitude toward education.13 Particularly one-to-one laptop to student ratio is shown to enhance learning programs in preparing students of all socioeconomic status to succeed in the 21st century workplace. Providing low-income students who normally would not have access to computers at home with laptops helps to minimize or close the “digital divide” and increase student achievement.14 Core Values about Teaching and Learning Our core teaching and learning values, that is, what we believe and how it has influenced the design of Helix High School: STEM – have arisen from Louisianaʼs collaboration with the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. Our values are: (1) authentic assessment; i.e., utilizing multiple measures of mastery; (2) building understanding across and among core subjects as well as 21st century interdisciplinary themes, such as transliteracy (see section on “integrated technology”); (3) engaging students with real world data, tools, and experts; (4) knowing that students learn best when they are actively engaged in solving meaningful problems; and (5) integrating what students learn with what communities need. 10 Flowers, N., Mertens, S., & Mulhull, P. "The Impact of Teaming: Five Research-Based Outcomes." Middle School Journal (1999): 57-60. 11 Mertens, S, & Flowers, N. “Middle School Practices Improves Student Achievement in High Poverty Schools.” Middle School Journal (2003): 33-43 12 Felner, R., Jackson, A., & Kasak, D. “The Impact of School Reform for the Middle Years: Longitudinal Study of a Network Engaged in Turning Points-Based Comprehensive School Transformation.” Phi Delta Kappan (1997): 78, 528-532. 13 La, P. "One-to-one Laptop Programs." 2009. B. Hoffman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Educational Technology. <http://edweb.sdsu.edu/eet/articles/lptpprgrms/index.htm>. 14 Hug, Sarah T. and Andrew A. Zucker. "A Study of the 1:1 Laptop Program at the Denver School of Science & Technology." December 2007. Education Resources Information Center (ERIC). <http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/3d/10/8c.pdf>. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 12 of 195
  • 12. A !"#"$% !!"#$%&"'$&()"*(+,-".$/0%1"231((!" 24%&-5"%&+6-)&%"70!!",/$6+$&-"70&1" &1-"8)(7!-6,-9"%80!!%"$)6 ":$!+-%")-3-%%$/4"&(";-3(5-"$3&0:-" $)6"%+33-%%<+!"5-5;-/%"(< " $"64)$503"!-$/)0),"3(55+)0&4= T &"##"$% 1-"#$%&"'$&()"*(+,-".$/0%1"231((!" 24%&-59"0)">$/&)-/%10>"70&1"(+/"3(55+)0&49 "-6+3$&-%"$!!"%&+6-)&%"&("&1-0/"5$?05+5" >(&-)&0$!"0)"$"3$/0),9"/0,(/(+%" $)6"%$<-"-):0/()5-)&= !"##"$%&'())*+,%!"##"$%&'#'$"() !"##"$%&'())*+,%!"##"$%&'#'$"()%
  • 13. MISSION AND VISION Mission and Academic Philosophy The mission of the proposed Helix High School: STEM (Helix High School: STEM) is to provide the greater Baton Rouge region with a tuition-free, student-centered learning place that is a pathway to successful postsecondary placement and ultimately, to success in the STEM industries. In fulfilling this mission, it is our goal is to develop citizens who will learn continuously as our economies and communities change; in essence, to prepare traditionally underserved students for STEM careers. Our target population will not be those students who are necessarily high achievers, but rather at-risk students of our region who deserve the opportunity for a free, rigorous education that is personalized to meet individualsʼ needs and that provides adequate support along the way to academic success. The underpinning beliefs of the proposed high school includes the following: (1) all students can learn; (2) students rise to the expectations that adults have of them; (3) students must have a voice in determining how they learn; and 4) students have a right to expect and receive high-quality, engaging educational opportunities. These beliefs will be shared among all staff, faculty, students and stakeholders who interact with the school regularly, creating a culture that ingrained in the school, contributing to academic success of all students. The philosophy behind the design of Helix High School: STEM has emerged largely as a response to changing economic indicators in the region. Agricultural, manufacturing, and traditional service sectors are being replaced with a knowledge sector that requires independent, responsible decision makers who can rise to the challenges of new and unexpected situations. Preparing adolescents to become such individuals requires a school environment that is built upon a platform centered on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). The basic components of ICT are: (1) finding out information; (2) developing ideas and making things happen; (3) exchanging and sharing information; and (4) reviewing, modifying, and evaluating work in process.15 While a strong mastery of ICT and content-specific goals are critical to preparing a digitally- literate citizen for a successful career in STEM fields, so is the mastery of “soft skills” 16 that will allow them to develop into self-sufficient individuals and to compete in the global economy of tomorrow. Examples include decision-making, independent thinking, critical thinking, motivated life-long learning, and problem solving. Examples of soft skills include decision- making, independent thinking, critical thinking, motivated life-long learning, and problem solving. These soft skills will be the core expertise with which students will graduate from Helix High School: STEM. From the mission and the philosophy came the schoolʼs design principles, which will permeate every aspect of academic life at the school for students, teachers, staff, and school leadership. These principles are as follows: personalization, technology integration, college readiness, and adult-world connections. 15 "Sun ICT Solutions for Schools: 21st Centure Learning on World-Class ICT Solutions." 2007. Sun Microsystems. <http://uk.sun.com/servicessolutions/industries/education/schools/pdf/schools_ICT_Solution_DSv3.pdf>. 16 Marquit, Miranda. "Increase the Chances of Finding a Job in This Recession by Focusing on Soft Skills." 29 July 2009. AllBusiness.com. 29 July 2009 <http://www.allbusiness.com/labor-employment/human-resources-personnel/12512301-1.html>. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 13 of 195
  • 14. Personalization A personalized learning plan, overseen by an advisor who serves the student throughout his or her career at Helix High School: STEM, will guide each student's learning experiences. Students of all proficiencies and abilities will follow an individual learning plan to reach grade level equivalencies necessary for course and grade promotion. Advisors will discuss the learning plan with students and parents, as well as teachers who will team-teach to manage student projects. Advisors will help students plan for appropriate enrichment or remedial activities offered during quarterly breaks, guiding students toward resources and opportunities that will be most beneficial for students to improve understanding, building skills, and acquire knowledge. This daily contact with a core group of student will enable advisors to monitor the studentʼs personal and academic development throughout their high school tenure. The advisor will model best practices in decision-making, prioritizing, and time management for students. Advisors will also serve as the point of contact for families and will be able to liaise with community support services if necessary. We believe that this level of personalization will result in student retention and academic achievement. Integrated Technology Technology-rich curriculum produces better results for all students by creating engaging, personalized, and productive learning.17 Although technology has been a part of education for over thirty years, it has not been used to its full potential, especially in public schools located in low-income communities. Many schools are considered technology-rich, but the technology has been relegated to an expensive tool for presentations or remedial instruction, and a “course” for teaching computer literacy skills (e.g., typing, Microsoft Office). At Helix High School: STEM technology will be used in all academic activities as a tool to enhance exploration, investigation, and intellectual discourse. As an example, technology has been used heretofore to address literacy through such approaches as Read 180. Integrated technology will transform those approaches, resulting in “transliteracy.” Transliteracy is effective communication that requires reading, writing, and interacting across multiple media and social platforms.18 Technology will also serve as a means of supporting students and measuring student performance. Helix High School: STEM is designed to include a one-to-one laptop program for students and teachers so that visual, hands-on learning opportunities will be available across the curriculum. The proposed school will use Netbook devices, rather than laptops, which are much more affordable, lightweight, and provide similar features to laptops that benefit student learning. Another tool that will further integrate technology for a student is the use of Appleʼs iPod Touch. With the rapid creation of applications, students will be able to follow and/or create blogs, listen to podcasts (or create his or her own!), search the dictionary, use a scientific calculator, or freely listen to iTunes University options—to name just a few. The technology-focused curriculum will enable mass distribution of educational models and results, ensure a high probability of student engagement and regular school attendance, and allow students to learn at their own pace, thus fostering a deep understanding of the core curriculum. As a result, the learning becomes a personalized experience for each student. Technology provides more readily the means for teachers to give focused, strategic attention to problem areas for each student. Industry and community experts will be available to the students via video conferencing and/or interactive on-line courses, harnessing the power of technology for 17 “Overview of Technology and Education Reform.” U.S. Department of Education. July 2009. <http://www.ed.gov/pubs/EdReformStudies/EdTech/overview.html#goals2000>. 18 KnowledgeWorks Foundation. “2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning.” 2009. <www.futureofed.org>. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 14 of 195
  • 15. advanced educational opportunities. (For instance, the Louisiana Virtual School offers courses to students all over Louisiana.) Integrated technology is a fundamental piece of amplifying the organization of pedagogy; it is able to handle the multiple means by which information is transferred and learning transformed. Helix High School: STEM will offer a technology-rich environment at the high school level to traditionally underserved students, providing the region with the human capital it needs to meet the workforce needs of the 21st century. This is a positive step in developing digitally- literate who would have statistically fallen victim to the digital divide and would therefore be less competitive than their peers in securing valuable jobs in the STEM fields. Technology is essential to the success of our communities—locally, regionally, nationally, and globally. The collection of 21st century skills developed in the high school, along with Helix High School: STEMʼs collaboration with Louisiana State University, will give students a strong advantage in post-secondary coursework, as well as post-secondary career placements. College Readiness Helix High School: STEM is an early college high school; that is, a small autonomous school that blends high school and college into a coherent educational program. The school is designed for a student demographic who may very well be underrepresented or even absent at the university; it is designed for students who may have been or are being underserved in previous/current educational experiences. The high school program aims to prepare all students to undertake a four-year college or university career pathway. The curriculum is the Louisiana Core Curriculum. It is rigorous, demands high expectations, and provides the foundation for entry and success at the post-secondary level. A challenge that we will face, but we are confident we can overcome, is providing this intense curriculum to students who are struggling academically. Many students will be in need of remediation and support. To assist us in meeting the needs of our target population, we will partner with Career Compass, a successful non-profit organization in the region, which has dramatically increased the number of at-risk students accepted by colleges and universities. We have also planned our school calendar to have one week between each quarterly break dedicated to remediation and enrichment courses. We will create individual learning plans for students, continuously assess academic progress, and support to students to in achieving their success in high school, college, and beyond. In our effort to remove either real or perceived barriers to entering a university, Helix High School: STEM will familiarize students with the university campus. A common barrier to entering a university is the unfamiliarity with the university for many students from rural or low- income urban communities. The size alone of Louisianaʼs flagship university can be intimidating for students; early exposure to the campus and its students, teachers, and staff can create a smoother transition from high school to university for many students who might otherwise have perceived the university as out of reach, intimidating, and unfamiliar. By gaining frequent access to LSUʼs campus, students will have a much stronger connection to the environment for which Helix High School: STEM is preparing them. Helix High School: STEM will also adopt the early college school model to provide a supporting learning environment that incorporates effective instructional and structural practices19. The four core principals of early college high schools are as follows: (1) a commitment to serving students underrepresented in higher education; (2) early college high schools are created and sustained by a local education agency, a higher education institution, and the community; all of whom are jointly accountable for student success; (3) early college 19 Early College High School Initiative Core Principals (2008) [on-line]. Available at: http://www.earlycolleges.org/Downloads/ECHSICorePrin.pdf Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 15 of 195
  • 16. high schools and their higher education partners and community jointly develop an integrated academic program so all students earn one to two years of transferable college credit leading to college completion; (4) early college schools engage all students in a comprehensive support system that develops academic and social skills as well as the behaviors and conditions necessary for college completion; and (5) early college schools and their higher education and community partners work with intermediaries to create conditions and advocate for supportive policies that advance the early college movement. As an early college high school, Helix High School: STEM expects to experience the success of other such schools in preparing their students for postsecondary education.20 Students experience an orientation for development of personal responsibility. This orientation contributes to the self- management that is critical to success across all phases of learning. Adult-World Connection At Helix High School: STEM, the curriculum delivery and daily schedule will be similar to those that students would experience at the university level and will be delivered through integrated, project-based approaches. Like traditional schools, full-time teaching staff will teach students, but these teachers will receive support from industry and university representatives both in and outside of the classroom. Students will arrive at school at 9:30am each weekday and work until 5:30pm. For the most part, school will be in session year-round. Classrooms across grades will have small-group learning and project areas, ubiquitous wireless laptop access, and displayed prototypes and final projects. Students will experience some of their most valuable learning outside the school walls. For instance, field-trips to BP America plants and off-shore oil rigs, as well as to NASA to place students in real-world situations that will augment their virtual experiences with STEM studies. Additional outside of the classroom experiences will be offered in the 9th and 10th grade students. They will have opportunities to "shadow" an adult through a workday, perform community service in a group project, and engage in “power lunches” with outside adults on issues of interest. Juniors will complete a semester-long academic service learning project in a local business, industry, or non-profit. Seniors will develop substantial projects that will enable them to complete their academic requirements while working to address problems of community interest and concern. These projects will contribute to our regionʼs collective learning, such as the importance of “green” construction. Target Population In year one, the school will open enrollment to all students who are eligible for the 9th grade (according to Louisiana public education policy). We anticipate many applicants having a socio-economic background that might typically prevent them from enrolling in a rigorous, challenging high school curriculum if they were not selected to attend an academically challenging public high school. Helix High School: STEM will not preclude students who are not high academic achievers; we will work with all students to ensure academic success through remedial and enrichment programs. The middle schools targeted for recruitment will include those with high percentages of students eligible for free and reduced lunch. Once approved, Helix will work closely with East Baton Rouge Parish Schools to establish partnerships with neighboring school districts. The student enrollment goal for the first year is to serve a total of 125 freshmen students from East Baton Rouge and the larger Baton Rouge 20 Lieberman, Janet. “The Early College High School Concept: Requisites for Success.” Jobs for the Future. June 2004. <http://www.earlycolleges.org/Downloads/ECHSConcept.pdf>. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 16 of 195
  • 17. region including Ascension, City of Baker, Central, Iberville, Pointe Coupee, West Baton Rouge, and Zachary Community Schools. Student admissions will be based on a lottery system. Each year Helix High School: STEM will use the sum total number of students served by each target district to calculate a percentage of spots available to students from each district21. The schools are anticipated to reflect a student body similar in demographics to the districts from which the students will be drawn. All districts, with the exception of Ascension and Zachary Community Schools, serve above 50% at-risk students and minorities in public schools. Spaces remaining after the lottery will be filled by students from all areas in the larger waiting pool. Helix High School: STEM intends to give these students an opportunity for a rigorous, relevant, and engaging high school education, with the expectation that they will continue to a four-year university and complete a STEM curriculum. Evidence of Effectiveness on Target Population Serving at-risk students is central to our mandate and mission. Engaging students in a personalized way and providing relevance of academic coursework are two ways to significantly increase student cognitive retention in high school. Research has indicated that an interdisciplinary approach to education in at-risk student populations leads to positive academic achievement and improved student outcomes.22 These outcomes include: ! Improved student academic achievement ! Accelerated student academic achievement of low-income, ethnic and minority students ! Student academic engagement ! Improved student self-esteem and self-concept ! Reduced student behavior issues In schools with similar demographics to the proposed school, where teams of teachers cooperatively implemented interdisciplinary curriculum and instructional practices, such as thematic project-based learning and inquiry learning, studies have found higher student academic achievement compared to schools with traditional subject-centered curriculum and instructional practices.23 Other research has revealed that equity issues were improved when teams of teachers used practices from multiple disciplines in schools.24 Students achieved higher academic gains in schools where teachers were experienced in collectively using such practices. Beyond student academic achievement, researchers note other positive student outcomes related to teaching teams engaged in interdisciplinary approaches, including increased engagement, improved self-esteem and self-concept, and decreased negative behavior.25 Student motivation increases as rote learning and content coverage is de-emphasized and students are provided choice. Student learning in classrooms with an interdisciplinary approach emulates learning in natural situations such as apprenticeships. 21 In Year One, seats per district will be: Ascension 22.88% (29),Central 4.33% (5),East Baton Rouge 52.36% (65),Iberville 5.08% (6), Pointe Coupee 3.14% (4), West Baton Rouge 4.52% (6), Zachary Community Schools 5.51% (7), City of Baker 2.18%, (3). 22 Martin L. Maehr; Carol Midgley “Enhancing Student Motivation: A Schoolwide Approach,” Educational Psychologist (1991): V26.3 399-427. 23 Flowers, N., Mertens, S., & Mulhull, P. "The Impact of Teaming: Five Research-Based Outcomes." Middle School Journal (1999): 57-60. 24 Mertens, S, & Flowers, N. “Middle School Practices Improves Student Achievement in High Poverty Schools.” Middle School Journal (2003): 33-43 25 Felner, R., Jackson, A., & Kasak, D. “The Impact of School Reform for the Middle Years: Longitudinal Study of a Network Engaged in Turning Points-Based Comprehensive School Transformation.” Phi Delta Kappan (1997): 78, 528-532. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 17 of 195
  • 18. Research shows that technology integration offers at-risk students a differentiated and innovative learning experience that will improve their motivation and attitude toward education.26 In particular, one-to-one laptop ratio is shown to enhance learning programs in preparing students of all socioeconomic statuses to succeed in the 21 st century workplace. Providing low-income students who normally would not have access to computers at home with laptops helps to minimize or close the “digital divide” and increase student achievement.27 Helix High School: STEM will participate in the one-to-one laptop program, with Netbook computers for all students and teachers in the school. This technology blends the affordability of portable devices with the power of desktop computers. Clear technology acceptable use agreements will ensure students are well trained and supported in their daily use of these devices. Meeting the Requirement to Serve At-Risk Students Helix High School: STEM will take every reasonable measure to ensure that all student needs are met. The school will team students with a staff advisor, who will monitor the studentʼs personal and academic development and serve as the point of contact for the family. Additionally Helix High School: STEM will put into place a counseling system to assist all students in preparing high quality applications for college, taking required exams, and ensuring they are aware of TOPS criteria to qualify for the scholarship completion of high school. Students with special needs will also receive individual attention in a full inclusion model. The high school will monitor student academic progress and create an individualized plan for each student to succeed in course passage, grade promotion, high school graduation, and university admission. To best serve all students, including the at-risk target population who may need remedial help in coursework to close the achievement gap, Helix High School: STEM teachers will create an individualized educational plan for each student, schedule weekly team planning time to discuss how to overcome learning challenges with students who need extra attention, and monitor progress toward academic achievement, as outlined in the TOPS curriculum. Helix High School: STEM will offer a variety of opportunities for remediation on an as-needed basis to students who require further support. Meeting the needs of at-risk students, in an effort toward retention, is central to our mandate and mission of providing a tuition-free, student-centered learning place that is a pathway to success for all students. Our recruitment efforts will not preclude any students of not applying to enroll in the school. We intend to undertake the following activities to reach prospective students: ! Brochures, pamphlets, and flyers (materials will be translated into relevant languages) ! Recruitment events ! Radio announcements and television commercials ! Phone banks ! Engaging community leaders ! Strategic participation in community events ! Partner with local community organizations, recreation centers, churches ! Post information in middle schools For those students who are recruited and successfully enroll in the school through the lottery system, we bring relevance to learning. Helix High School: STEM will familiarize students with 26 La, P. "One-to-one Laptop Programs." 2009. B. Hoffman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Educational Technology. <http://edweb.sdsu.edu/eet/articles/lptpprgrms/index.htm>. 27 Hug, Sarah T. and Andrew A. Zucker. "A Study of the 1:1 Laptop Program at the Denver School of Science & Technology." December 2007. Education Resources Information Center (ERIC). <http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/3d/10/8c.pdf>. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 18 of 195
  • 19. local industries, showing the students how to apply classroom learning to real world, engaging projects. Students will have the opportunity to interact with successful adults who are industry representatives and content specialists in the fields of study that students are learning about. Students will be encouraged to ask these adults questions and learn more about careers of interest in the industry. The students will be able to apply knowledge obtained from coursework to co- and extra-curricular activities, which will reinforce the relevance of their curriculum to real world applications. Enrollment Projection Chart Grade Level Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Freshmen 125 125 125 125 125 Sophomores 0 125 125 125 125 Juniors 0 0 125 125 125 Seniors 0 0 0 125 125 TOTAL 125 250 375 500 500 Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 19 of 195
  • 20. EDUCATION PROGRAM Educational Philosophy, Curriculum, and Instruction OVERVIEW The success of tomorrow demands schools to transition from traditional methods of teaching to innovative approaches that help students understand how to process complex information and making sound decisions quickly. As schools work to prepare students for success in rapidly changing industries, and for jobs that may not exist today, conventional boundaries among subjects are neither sufficient, nor appropriate to prepare students for the challenges they will face as adults. To meet these needs, project-based inquiry approaches to teaching will drive the curriculum for Helix High School: STEM. Arbitrary separations between subject areas will dissolve as students work toward developing solutions to authentic, community and industry problems within an interdisciplinary, solution-based learning environment. Helix High School: STEM will work with freshmen and sophomores to build a foundation of knowledge and a deep understanding of coursework needed for high school students. During these years, students will work on becoming masters in core curriculum competencies. Accelerated opportunities will be available for students who advance through the core curriculum at a faster rate; they will have the option of dual- or concurrent- enrollment at the university in their last two years of high school. Recognizing the variance in student learning styles, motivations, and backgrounds, faculty will use technology as a tool to enhance instruction and will closely monitor and frequently assess studentsʼ progress to ensure comprehension of the taught material. Students will enter Helix High School: STEM at varying levels of proficiency. The inclusive learning environment will require teamwork from students, made up of students with varying degrees of talents in different subject areas, collaborating on projects. The school calendar allows for two-week break periods between each ten-week quarter. One of the two-weeks will be dedicated to remediation and enrichment for students. The junior and senior years will continue to offer courses in the core curriculum, while allowing students to begin to specialize in the areas in which they have the most interest and skills. Student service learning projects will be available for students in their junior year. Those who have chosen an accelerated path will have the option to matriculate in dual or concurrent enrollment courses. We anticipate that dual and concurrent enrollment options will include, but are not limited to, College Algebra, Calculus, College Biology, College Chemistry, Computer Science, and Environmental Systems. To fulfill the mission of preparing students for LSU STEM majors, Helix High School: STEM is creating a collegiate learning environment within the school. There will be no bells in the school; students will be dismissed from class verbally at the appointed time and expected to arrive promptly at the next class. Similarly, students will have an open lunch hour, and will be permitted to use downtown food vendors. Students are responsible for arriving back at the campus in time for class after leaving the building for lunch. This sense of personal responsibility and culture of high expectations will prepare students to be responsible in the university, in their daily lives, and in their careers. Helix High School: STEM is also partnering with LSU to provide outreach to enhance the Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 20 of 195
  • 21. learning experience for students at the school. The LSU/Helix partnership is two-fold, first LSU will offer services such as providing expertise from the university to help align university coursework with high school classes and to provide consultation to teachers on complex student projects. Secondly, our students will have access to LSUʼs campus. During their junior and senior years, students who have reached a specified level of academic proficiency will have the option to participate in certain dual- or concurrent-enrollment courses at LSU. The early access to university coursework will put high school students on a fast track to graduating from the university, thereby encouraging them to apply for enrollment in the university and promoting retention following acceptance. Instructional Methods Throughout studentsʼ tenure at Helix High School: STEM, their teachers will deliver methods of instruction that support the need for developing 21st century skills. Such skills include components of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), using technology in instruction as a tool for learning and developing digital literacy, and developing soft skills. As mentioned before, the basic components of ICT are: (1) finding out information; (2) developing ideas and making things happen; (3) exchanging and sharing information; and (4) reviewing, modifying, and evaluating work in process. Since the mission of the school is to prepare students for the university and careers in the STEM fields, teachers will use methods of instruction that encourage students to develop skills that are built upon the ICT components, as well as digital literacy and soft skill proficiencies. To do this, teachers will instruct students in a way that is more like coaching than dictating. Students will be encouraged to research and experiment independently in order to complete the projects necessary for promotion. Teachers will design projects that promote student ownership and responsibility for learning, while allowing students to meet grade level equivalencies defined by the Louisiana Core Curriculum Content Standards. An example of a project that a teacher may design would be for students to test soil samples at the levee near the Mississippi to understand the impact that pollution is having on the environment. Students would learn about the river, which may be part of geography, social studies, or a history course. At the same time, they may be building an understanding of biology and/or chemistry concepts with their science teacher. As part of the project, students may also be required to write a report on their findings. This part of the project might be led by the English Language Arts teacher and/or an elective teacher, depending on the electives offered that year. Instruction will be delivered in inquiry- and problem-based methods that require students to think critically and engage in knowledge seeking activities. Since technology is an integral piece of the curriculum and instruction, students will employ the internetʼs vast resources, while learning more about the tool that they are using to foster critical, innovative ideas to take full advantage of technology. Students must then demonstrate learning through presentations and other means of voicing what they have learned. Students will have a certain level of creative freedom to develop their own ideas within the parameters set by the curriculum and grade level equivalencies. Students will graduate with the tools to find information that may inspire ideas and the technical skills and knowledge to bring their ideas to fruition. This is the second component of ICT learning, which requires students to develop ideas and make things happen. An example of this would involve a group of students working together to compete against their classmates to develop the most effective pulley system. They are given a variety of items that could be fashioned into a pulley system. Rather than create a number of different pulley systems, and test their effectiveness, they decide to use computer visualization techniques to simulate the pulley system. They donʼt know how to use the visualization software or what product to use, so they research the various types of software and teach themselves to use it. Students will be encouraged to Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 21 of 195
  • 22. develop the soft skills of self-motivated learning and knowledge-seeking to find out how to use technology to complete their project. The knowledge that they acquire, coupled with staff support and creative ideas that students develop on their own, will result in the studentsʼ making this happen. Instructional methods in the classroom will also encourage students to exchange and share information, which is the third ICT component. The use of technology in the classroom will assist students in sharing and exchanging information. Teachers will be encouraged to use social networking tools, publish personal websites, and create digital portfolios to serve as models for sharing information. Teachers will also coach students on exchanging and sharing information. Students will develop strong communication skills as they exchange and share information to work on their projects effectively and efficiently, with the help of their teacher. Students will be required to share information learned by creating presentations. Not only will these presentations serve as a learning opportunity for the other students, they will also allow the presenting students to augment their professionalism and public communication skills. Before projects are complete and students present what they have learned, they will undertake a process of reviewing, modifying, and evaluating their work. This review process requires critical thinking, discipline, and consciousness of deadlines. Instruction by teachers will encourage this process; for example, teachers may require students to report on a project in four phases. Teachers would provide students with guidance in performing a critical review and modifications to their projects. This process will help students gain skills that will be useful in college studies, and in the workplace. Evidence of Effectiveness Interdisciplinary Approach Interdisciplinary curriculum is "any curriculum that deliberately links content and modes of inquiry normally associated with more than one of the scholarly disciplines”.28 It is a curriculum approach that is key to project-based learning, and it is effective because it promotes a deeper understanding of all subject content areas. Projects that are taught in Helix High School: STEM will be cross-curricular and will require students to employ the four basic components of ICT, just as projects in the university, workplace, and adult world are completed. Technology enhances the studentʼs ability to complete a high quality final product, and to understand how as a tool technology can help students find solutions. Research has indicated that an interdisciplinary approach to education leads to positive student outcomes including the following: ! Improved student academic achievement ! Accelerated student academic achievement of low income, ethnic and minority students ! Student academic engagement ! Improved student self-esteem and self-concept ! Reduced student behavior issues Students achieved higher academic gains in schools where teachers were experienced in using such practices. Critical caveats to these findings are the importance of common planning time for teachers when engaging in interdisciplinary work, as well as structuring student schedules to allow teams of teachers to work with a common set of students. When school organize curriculum, instruction and structural components around a multidisciplinary research there are positive outcomes for teachers and overall school effectiveness. The interdisciplinary approach has a strong theoretical foundation and a growing research base 28 Vars, G. F. (1993). Interdisciplinary teaching: Why and how. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 22 of 195
  • 23. for positive student and school outcomes. Project-based Inquiry Learning A fundamental component of an interdisciplinary approach is project-based inquiry learning. Such learning requires students to think deeply about what they learn and build knowledge relevant to their lives. Good questions open our minds, allow us to consider a wide range of possible responses, options and solutions, and foster receptivity to alternate possibilities, thereby offering a space for generating even further options. Both interdisciplinary teaching approaches and inquiry-based teaching are heavily dependent on administrative leadership and teachers skilled in providing the necessary opportunities and conditions. Helix High School: STEM will target recruitment of teachers to hire teachers who have experience working in project-based learning environments. Prior to the schoolʼs opening, teachers will participate in professional development activities that help them develop and build on skills for teaching approaches that will be expected throughout the year. Once the school opens, teachers will receive ongoing professional development to further develop these skills. Helix High School: STEM is designed for team teaching, which will also help teachers develop projects and deliver teaching approaches that are expected to teach students within the school. Inquiry learning boosts student performance and attitude toward learning, particularly in science and math, and subjects that demand verbal and written communication.29 Moreover, inquiry develops a confluence of skills, knowledge, and dispositions in a way that demands a connection to real life. Seeking solutions to authentic and personally meaningful questions, students engage in inquiry through extended investigation, questioning, collaboration, and the use of technology. Inquiry learning is advocated by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the National Science Teachers Association, the National Council of Teachers of English, the National Research Council, and the International Society for Technology in Education. Integrated Technology Technology-rich curriculum produces better results for all students by creating engaging, personalized, and productive learning.30 Technology will be used in all academic activities as a tool to enhance exploration, investigation, and intellectual discourse. Integrated technology will transform those approaches, resulting in “transliteracy.” Transliteracy is effective communication that requires reading, writing, and interacting across multiple media and social platforms.31 Technology will also serve as a means of supporting students and measuring student performance. Helix High School: STEM is designed to include a one-to-one laptop program for students and teachers so that visual, hands-on learning opportunities will be available across the curriculum. The proposed school is expected to use Netbook devices, rather than laptops, which are much more affordable, lightweight, and provide many features that will benefit student learning. Another tool that will further integrate technology for a student is the use of Appleʼs iPod Touch. With the rapid creation of applications, students will be able to follow and/or create blogs, listen to podcasts (or create his/her own!), search the dictionary, use a scientific calculator, or freely listen to iTunes University options—to name just a few. The technology-focused curriculum will enable mass distribution of educational models and results, ensure a high probability of student engagement and regular school attendance, and allow students to learn at their own pace, thus fostering a deep understanding of the core curriculum. 29 Borasi, R. (1992). Learning mathematics through inquiry. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. 30 “Overview of Technology and Education Reform.” U.S. Department of Education. July 2009. <http://www.ed.gov/pubs/EdReformStudies/EdTech/overview.html#goals2000>. 31 KnowledgeWorks Foundation. “2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning.” 2009. <www.futureofed.org>. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 23 of 195
  • 24. Todayʼs students face technology opportunities previous generations could only imagine. The acceleration of technology has allowed for rapid dissemination and application of information, especially within the fields of science and mathematics. Meaningful integration of technology enhances learning experiences.32 LOUISIANA CORE CURRICULUM The Louisiana Grade Level Expectations and Louisiana Core Curriculum underpin the overall structure of the curriculum and provide the basic foundation for the core subject areas that will be taught. The Louisiana Core Curriculum (LCC) is aligned with national standards, which effectively align the aforementioned components. In many respects, the expectations of the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education are equal to, if not greater than, the expectations of most states in regard to accountability. For these reasons, Helix High School: STEM will use the Louisiana Core Curriculum to teach the state content standards in English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. Scope and Sequence Freshman Year: Students will have multiple real-world opportunities to study and integrate Algebra I, Physical Science, Technology, and Engineering concepts that incorporate causal research strategies (e.g., Cothernʼs Four Question Research Strategy33). During the course of the year, students will learn how to collect, display, and analyze data and report their research findings. Some of these investigations will occur outside of the classroom at a local field site. For example, students may investigate the scientific and mathematical dynamics at a water park. They will be expected to choose a Capstone Scientific Research (CSR) project that interests them and capitalizes on the phenomena identified at the water park. Ninth grade technology, science, and mathematics proficiencies will be integrated into these field-based projects and research experiences. Ideas that span these three areas may include digital operations and concepts, investigations in energy, force and motion, solving basic equations, identifying independent/dependent variables from scientific and algebraic perspectives, and modeling real life relationships in linear functions. Since students will most likely be unaccustomed to project-based inquiry methods, it is anticipated that the 9 th grade year will be an adjustment period as students learn to meet the expectations of rigorous self-directed projects. Sophomore Year: While the content areas will address Biology I, Geometry, Technology, and Engineering, the inquiry-based methodology will emphasize descriptive research strategies. The LSU lakes, the Baton Rouge Recreation and Parks Commission Blackwater Conservation Area, or a water purification plant will serve as possible field study sites. Deductive and inductive reasoning premises, along with dimensional structures in geometry, will complement the biological investigations. Technology and engineering applications will use models and simulations to explore these complex systems and issues. The research methods will build on causal strategies introduced in the previous year and will highlight more qualitative approaches to research. The research methods will include collecting data to yield new information, generating better questions, and learning to synthesize emerging patterns that lead to new questions and further investigations. Junior Year: Recognizing that students may be enrolled in a variety of science and mathematics courses to meet their own needs and interests, the junior year content courses 32 Newby, T., Stepich, D. Lehman, J. & Russell, J.(2006). Educational technology for teaching and learning. (3rd ed). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, Merril, Prentice Hall. 33 Cothron, Giese, and Rezba, Students and Research, 2000 Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 24 of 195
  • 25. will target correlation research strategies that complement the content area and explore relationships among variables at field study sites. For example, chemistry students might engage in studies related to a chemical plant, while physics students might engage in research related to the Livingston Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). Engineering concepts and technology standards that emphasize communication and teamwork will be embedded in projects and assessments throughout the year. Examples will include collaborating and publishing with peers and experts and employing a variety of digital media to communicate information effectively to multiple audiences. Senior Year: In their senior years, students will continue to diverge and specialize in areas based on their interests. The content courses will provide opportunities for students to design and carry out creative, complex field investigations that draw upon previously mastered content and research methodologies. Junior and senior level students will use increasingly sophisticated technology and tools to collect, analyze, and synthesize data and share their results. It is anticipated that seniors will rely more heavily on mentors as they progress through high school, with the senior year showing the most growth and maturity. They will have the experience and knowledge to use critical thinking skills, plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Graduating seniors will exhibit model leadership qualities and have the communication, content, and research backgrounds to enter the next phase of their lives well prepared for the postsecondary and career paths they have chosen. Helix High School: STEM will take every reasonable measure to ensure that all student needs are met. The school will team students with a staff advisor, who will monitor the studentʼs personal and academic development and serve as the point of contact for the family. Additionally Helix High School: STEM will put into place a counseling system to assist all students in preparing high quality applications for college, taking required exams, and ensuring they are aware of TOPS criteria to qualify for the scholarship completion of high school. Students with special needs will also receive individual attention in a full inclusion model. The high school will monitor student academic progress and create an individualized plan for each student to succeed in course passage, grade promotion, high school graduation, and university admission. To best serve all students, including the at-risk target population who may need remedial help in coursework to close the achievement gap, Helix High School: STEM teachers will create an individualized educational plan for each student, schedule weekly team planning time to discuss how to overcome learning challenges with students who need extra attention, and monitor progress toward academic achievement, as outlined in the TOPS curriculum. Helix High School: STEM will offer a variety of opportunities for remediation on an as-needed basis to students who require further support. MEASURABLE ACADEMIC GOALS OF HELIX HIGH SCHOOL: STEM Goals and Criteria for Measuring Academic Viability Criterion: Attendance Students regularly come to school on time: ! Year 1: Tardiness < 15%, ADA = 90% ! Year 2: Tardiness < 12%, ADA = 91% ! Year 3: Tardiness < 10%, ADA = 92% ! Year 4: Tardiness < 8%, ADA = 93% ! Year 5: Tardiness < 5%, ADA = 95% Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 25 of 195
  • 26. Criterion: State Assessments Students show comprehension of Louisiana State Standards: ! Year 1: Freshmen: > 50% score “Basic” or above on iLeap ! Year 2: Freshmen: > 53% score “Basic” or above on iLeap Sophomore > 70% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Math, English) s: ! Year 3: Freshmen: > 55% score “Basic” or above on iLeap Sophomore > 73% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Math, English) s: Juniors: > 70% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Science, Social Studies) ! Year 4: Freshmen: > 60% score “Basic” or above on iLeap Sophomore > 77% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Math, English) s: Juniors: > 75% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Science, Social Studies) Seniors: > 90% score on Capstone Project > 90 % on-time graduation ! Year 5: Freshmen: > 65% score “Basic” or above on iLeap Sophomore > 77% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Math, English) s: Juniors: > 78% score “Basic” or above on GEE (Science, Social Studies) Seniors: > 90% score on Capstone Project > 90% on-time graduation. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 26 of 195
  • 27. Criterion: Benchmarking Students indicate growth among the following assessments: Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA), End-of-Course Assessments, and Presentations of Learning (POLs). Year NWEA End-of-Course Exam POLs 1 Set Benchmark Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% 2 10 point gain Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% 3 8 point gain Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% 4 5 point gain Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% 5 3 point gain Passage: > 80% Score: > 80% Criterion: Promotion There is steady growth in percentage of students who enter a grade in year one and are promoted to the next grade in year two. ! Year 1: Freshmen: 75+% ! Year 2: Freshmen: 78+% Sophomore 75+% s: ! Year 3: Freshmen: 80+% Sophomore 80+% s: Juniors: 80+% ! Year 4: Freshmen: 82+% Sophomore 80+% s: Juniors: 85+% ! Year 5 Freshmen: 85+% Sophomore 85+% s: Juniors: 90+% Criterion: Teacher Retention The school retains teachers so there is little attrition, and little disruption in advisor/advisee process. ! Year 1: Retention = 70+ % ! Year 2: Retention = 75+ % ! Year 3: Retention = 80+ % ! Year 4: Retention = 85+ % ! Year 5 Retention = 90+ % Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 27 of 195
  • 28. Criterion: Parent Involvement The school regularly engages parents/families as evidenced by the following data: (a) parent attendance at quarterly benchmarking conferences; (b) completion of two volunteer hours monthly; (c) attendance of parents at sub-committee meetings (led by a parent who serves on Helix Board); (d) completion of two home visits a year. . Year 1 (a) = > 50% (b) = > 25% (c) = > 10% (d) = > 50% Year 2 (a) = > 60% (b) = > 35% (c) = > 20% (d) = > 60% Year 3 (a) = > 70% (b) = > 40% (c) = > 30% (d) = > 65% Year 4 (a) = > 80% (b) = > 45% (c) = > 40% (d) = > 70% Year 5 (a) = > 80% (b) = > 50% (c) = > 50% (d) = > 75% Criterion: Stakeholder Satisfaction The school provides a voice to its students, parents/families, teachers, staff, volunteers, and industry and community partners to receive guidance about the quality of the schoolʼs services through surveys that are administered in the 2nd and 4th quarters. Surveys have a scale of 0 – 3, where 0 represents “extremely dissatisfied,” and 3 represents “extremely satisfied.” ! Q2 survey averages will equal 1.5 or higher each year ! Q4 survey averages will equal 2.5 or higher each year Monitoring and Reporting We believe that instructional methods and practices and effective delivery of the Louisiana Core Curriculum are vital to academic success. We will hold our school leaders accountable for instructional methods and practices and effective delivery of the Louisiana Core Curriculum by regular interim monitoring of the progress of the school toward its established annual goals as outlined in the charter. The Executive Director and the Director of Achievement will report monthly to the Helix Board on observations and student academic progress to determine improvement needs. The school's instructional methods and practices focus on students working in collaborative teams on authentic projects with real-world connections. This is a shift from high-stakes testing preparation, and therefore requires authentic measures appropriate to this pedagogical focus. Progress, then, is measured in a multimodal fashion including, but not limited to, feedback from teachers, students, and parents; presentations of learning; exhibitions of projects; and demonstration of learning in class. School performance will be evaluated through national and state comparison of standardized testing, student attrition rates, teacher satisfaction, family satisfaction, and community satisfaction as measured through surveys. Additionally, the high school will use monthly monitoring reports (third party consulting company) and annual external educational audits (measurements produced by an external evaluator). In the event that monthly and/or quarterly monitoring shows that progress toward the goals is not being made, the Director of Achievement will conduct a review to determine if the School Improvement Plan should be revised. If so, an effective implementation will begin immediately (see Appendix Strategic Achievement Plan.) If the school finds itself in any year in AUS1 (Academically Unacceptable School First Year), it will adhere to all the requirements of the Louisiana Accountability System. We believe that the school leader drives the success of the school, and we are committed to sourcing the best possible instructional leadership for the proposed school. We support school leaders in line with the ISLLC (Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium) Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 28 of 195
  • 29. standards for educational leaders, coupled with ongoing coaching and professional development opportunities each month led by local and national experts in the areas of instructional leadership and school reform. While understanding the need for consistency, we will make changes in the leadership if evidence shows that the individual at the helm is not performing to the standards and expectations set forth by the Executive Director and the Helix Board of Directors. Students with Exceptionalities COMPLIANCE WITH FEDERAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS Helix High School: STEM will comply with the laws governing the education of children with disabilities; i.e., the Federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), 20 U.S.C. §§1400-1485, and Louisianaʼs Education of Children with Exceptionalities Act, LA R.S. 17:1941 et seq. The school and its educational partners understand the mandate of these laws, which stipulate that charter schools, like traditional schools, must provide children with disabilities a free, appropriate public education that includes them in regular classrooms to the greatest extent possible. We also understand that charter schools, as the local educational agencies or LEAs, are legally responsible for putting all of the necessary systems in place to ensure that children with disabilities enjoy this right to a free, appropriate public education. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 reinforce the central idea of IDEA: to the maximum extent possible, a school must include children with disabilities in its regular activities and curriculum. The ADA requires schools to modify its physical facilities to provide students with disabilities the greatest possible access. Section 504 requires schools to actively seek out and identify children with disabilities so that it may provide them with the free and appropriate public education required by IDEA. Services Helix High School: STEM intends to respond to the needs of students with disabilities in ways that will enable them to achieve to the best of their abilities. Services will generally include specially designed instruction, program modifications, classroom accommodation, and supplementary learning aids and services. If students need additional services in line with special education, Helix High School: STEM will directly provide them or coordinate to find a provider. Special education services will include, but will not be limited to: ! Speech, occupational or physical therapy ! Interpreters ! Medical services ! Orientation and mobility services ! Adaptive physical education ! Parent counseling and training in support of the IEP ! Psychological or counseling services ! Recreation services ! Rehabilitation ! Social work services ! Transportation Helix High School: STEM will directly provide all services to the maximum extent of our resources and capabilities, and as they relate to the fair and equitable provision of our student academic achievement program. Third-party contracts will be enacted in some cases. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 29 of 195
  • 30. Personnel Devoted to Students with Disabilities The school design and staffing will provide Special Education staff. Professional development will be provided to both the Special Education staff and regular teaching staff who are assigned to instruct students identified as having a disability. To accomplish this objective, the school will: ! Contract a third party IEP Site Facilitator ! Develop a school-wide strategic plan that covers: ! Identification and evaluation of students with disabilities ! Development and implementation of IEPs ! Integration of students with disabilities into regular classrooms ! Communication with parents of students with disabilities ! Provision of appropriate training for each regular education teacher who serves a student with special needs in his/her regular classroom ! Provide each teacher with Special Education training no later than 10 days after a student with a disability is placed in his or her classroom ! Ensure that each teacher receives a signed copy of the studentʼs IEP no later than 5 days before the student is placed in his or her class ! Inform teachers that they have the right to participate on the IEP team of any student in their classrooms ! Inform teachers that they have the right to call an IEP team meeting about any student in their classrooms when they have good reason to do so ! Respect the law that makes it illegal for a school to require any regular education teacher to perform any health or medical procedures for a student with disabilities (although a teacher may, if s/he wishes, perform such services after proper training) IEP Assessment, Review, Revision, and Implementation Identification Process Identification, goal setting, and implementation of the Individualized Education Plan are the keys to providing children with disabilities an academic program that will improve their likelihood of success. Helix High School: STEM and its educational partners understand that a child with a disability is any child who meets both of the following criteria: ! S/he has a specific and identifiable learning disability, severe developmental delay, mental or physical impairment, or serious emotional disturbance ! This disability affects his or her ability to participate in the schoolʼs normal curriculum As a result the school will: ! Establish an in-school committee to handle all special education referrals. This committee will include the principal or his/her designee, at least one general education teacher, and at least one special education teacher ! Develop an internal referral policy: ! Train teachers to recognize signs of common disabilities ! Encourage teachers to report suspected cases of students with disabilities ! Provide a standard internal referral form ! For each referral, call a meeting of the in-school committee that must also include the referring teacher Within 10 days of a referral, the committee will meet and decide whether to evaluate the student. If a parent requests an evaluation, the school will initiate the internal referral process and conduct an evaluation as indicated by the referral process. To ensure that there is a consistent and effective method for evaluating students suspected of having a disability, the school will collaborate on the development of an evaluation policy: Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 30 of 195
  • 31. ! The policy will require the school to obtain parental consent to perform the specific evaluation procedures proposed ! Once a parent gives consent, the school will evaluate the student within 60 days. If the student is found to have a disability, an IEP will be developed within 30 days of the date of the finding ! If a parent does not consent, the school will conduct a hearing to determine whether evaluation is necessary ! If the outcome is in the schoolʼs favor, the school will conduct the evaluation ! If the outcome is not in the schoolʼs favor, and the school believes that the child will benefit from evaluation, the school will appeal ! If the appeal is denied, the school will take no further steps to evaluate the student or to provide him or her with services The team of evaluators that the school utilizes to perform evaluations will consist of individuals who are: ! Certified as examiners by the LA Department of Education ! Qualified in two or more disciplines The evaluations will consist of a variety of assessments to determine a childʼs strengths and weaknesses. They will also include observation of the child in his or her regular classroom by a teacher other than the referring teacher. The evaluation team will issue a written evaluation report. Parents will receive a copy of this report within three days of completion, and the report must otherwise be kept confidential. The report will contain: ! A determination of whether the child has a disability ! The basis for this determination ! Notes on the childʼs behavior from observations ! Educationally relevant medical findings or test results (if any) ! The teamʼs conclusion about the effect of the childʼs disability on his or her academic achievement ! The teamʼs conclusion about whether the gap between the childʼs ability and achievement is correctable without special education ! The teamʼs determination about the effects of the childʼs environment, culture, or economic disadvantage, if any The school will also develop a re-evaluation policy to ensure that individualized education plans for children with identified disabilities are reviewed and updated if necessary on a periodic basis, but no less frequently than once a year. The re-evaluation policy will be as follows: ! Parents, teachers, or administrators may request re-evaluation no more than once per school year, unless all parties agree to more ! Children receiving special education services must be re-evaluated at least once every three years ! A student must receive a new evaluation prior to the initiation or cessation of special education services ! No child can be qualified as needing special education if the discrepancy between his/her ability and achievement is due to a lack of proper instruction in any subject or skill evaluated, including a lack of fluency in English ! No child who is currently using illegal drugs may be qualified as needing special education, even if that child would otherwise qualify Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 31 of 195
  • 32. Once a child is evaluated and determined to have a disability, the schoolʼs Individualized Education Plan (IEP) Team will convene to develop an individual education plan for the student. The individualized education plans developed by the IEP Team will, as the name suggests, be individualized based on the studentʼs needs. Consistent with the spirit of IDEA, it will outline a plan that places the student in the “least restrictive environment” that will facilitate learning and include him or her in the regular classroom to the maximum extent feasible. It will be structured to encourage collaboration and cooperation among teachers and the Special Education team. The IEP team will meet no later than 30 days from the date that the child is determined to have a disability and will consist of the following individuals: ! The childʼs parents ! One of the childʼs regular education teachers ! At least one special education teacher ! A school administrator qualified to make decisions about special education ! An instructional expert (if none of the other members qualify) ! A bilingual staff member or translator, if appropriate ! The child, if appropriate The IEP team will develop an Individualized Education Plan that states in writing: ! The studentʼs present levels of academic achievement and performance ! A description of how the studentʼs disability affects his/her involvement and progress ! Measurable annual goals for the student, including a description of any alternative benchmarks or objectives that differ from the normal curriculum ! A description of the special education and related services to be provided ! A description of the extent, if any, to which the child will not participate in regular classroom activities ! Explanations of modifications for district or state standardized tests, if any ! The date on which services will start and the projected duration ! Additionally, for any student who reaches the age of 14 and has an IEP, the IEP will state in writing: ! Appropriate, measurable post-secondary goals for the child ! A description of any necessary transition services ! A statement that the child has been informed of his or her rights Once the parent consents to a childʼs placement as determined in his/her IEP, the student will be placed within 10 days. Informing Parents of Student Progress on Annual IEP Goals and Curriculum An initial IEP must be authorized and signed by parents before the school can begin any indicated services or activities. These caregivers will then receive a copy of the studentʼs IEP at no cost. Thirty days will be given to review and carefully consider the plan. Once accepted, the IEP can also be modified. Any team member can initiate a meeting at any point in the school year to propose changes to the IEP. Further, the IEP will be reviewed by the team – which includes parents – on an annual basis. Individual teachers will review academic progress on a more regular basis. This information will be shared with parents during quarterly parent-teacher meetings or as often as requested. In addition, the school will identify all special needs students on state assessments as required by the state of Louisiana. The results of the academic progress and status of all identified students will also be reported as required. Any mandates, or changes therein, to track and report the progress of special education students will be honored at all times. State Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 32 of 195
  • 33. examination outcomes will also be made readily available to parents. Further, the school will provide parents with a Procedural Safeguards Notice. This document will outline all procedural safeguards built into the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This information will be written in understandable language and will be translated into the native language of non-English speakers. Finally, the school will create a communication policy specifically for the parents of students with disabilities, which will be consistent with the Louisiana state education requirements for a special education parent communication policy. Students with Extended Year Service Needs Helix High School: STEM will ensure that the achievement needs of disabled students are met with the proper accommodations. The IEP Team will not only develop individualized plans, but will also hold regular meetings to proactively plan for the most engaging and effective achievement experiences for disabled students. These special meetings will be held by school-based staff members, but will also be open to parents. The calendar of the school is year-round, with two-week breaks between each 10-week quarter. Any additional accommodations that are needed for disabled students, including student needs while the school is not in session, will be assessed and recommended to school administrators, who will act accordingly. Recruitment and Retention of Students with Disabilities The school will work with local stakeholders to recruit students. Special emphasis will be placed on welcoming new students with disabilities. We intend to implement the following strategy to reach prospective students: ! Brochures, pamphlets, and fliers will be readily available for interested families (materials will be translated into relevant languages) ! Recruitment events will be held at the school to provide information to parents ! We will participate in strategic community events as a way of broadening exposure ! Enrollment recruiters will target local community organizations, recreation centers, churches, and middle schools, and may go door-to-door to share information STUDENTS WITH LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY Identification The families of all new students to the school will complete a student registration form. On the form will be three questions that serve as the first step of the screening process to determine whether a child is in need of ESL services. These questions are: ! What is the first language learned by the student? ! Is there a language other than English used at home, and if so, what is it? ! What is the language the student uses most often? Where a student's registration form shows the use of a language other than English, the student will be identified as a language minority student and must be screened for English language proficiency. Students whose first language was a language other than English, or who speak another language most of the time, must also be screened for English language proficiency. Students identified as language minority will be administered the Language Assessment Scales (LAS) Test. This test is an objective screening instrument used to assess English proficiency in order to determine whether the student is "Limited English Proficient" (LEP) and therefore eligible for services in the school's ESL program. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 33 of 195
  • 34. The school will provide a comprehensive achievement program designed to provide education that leads to the attainment of English proficiency and academic achievement. In addition to the above sources, the schoolʼs strong and inclusive community will provide added supports. Children with LEP will be equally celebrated, encouraged, and inspired to develop and demonstrate accomplishments. Tracking LEP Students Appropriately Each teacher of LEP students will be required to develop a year-round achievement plan to address the English language learning needs of specific students. The purpose of this plan will be to reflect regularly on individual progress with the goal of achieving proficiency during annual English Language Arts (ELA) assessments. A major component of this plan will be for students to be included in group projects and other activities along with non-LEP students to the greatest extent possible. Parents will be required to review and authorize their childrenʼs plans, with the opportunity to make recommendations for change at any point during design or implementation of the plans. Teachers will also be able to recommend adjustments to the LEP plan (with caregiver approval) for students to make effective progress. In addition to teachersʼ weekly progress notes on the LEP plan, studentsʼ scores on State ELA exams will be used to aid in ongoing monitoring. These data will serve as the most important marker of English language improvement, as scores are generated against scientifically accepted and standardized benchmarks. After achieving ELA proficiency, the academic progress of former LEP students will be monitored for two years. This will include future ELA scores as well as state content standards-based assessment, with primacy given to math scores. If a student fails to make academic progress during a monitoring year, students may be retested and reassessed, and their achievement plans revised. Strategies for Academic Success Helix High School: STEM will implement a range of strategies to respond flexibly to the needs of LEP students and ensure academic success. At each grade level, research-based language learning programs will be implemented. Due to the small school environment of the proposed school, students will have many opportunities to engage in these programs for deepened instruction during individualized and small group study. Teachers and staff will not only adjust achievement content but will allow students to receive information and to demonstrate what they have learned in ways that are appropriate to their level of English language acquisition. Classroom strategies to be used will include, but not be limited to, the following: FOR TEACHERS MATH ! Problem Solving ! Teach five simple steps to assist the student in solving a math problem ! Locate key words ! Guess and check ! Make a table ! Draw a picture ! Use logic ! Teacher Think Aloud ! Talking about the thinking process when modeling for students ! Student Developed Glossary Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 34 of 195
  • 35. ! Students keep track of key content and concept words and define them in a log READING ! Chunking and Questioning ! Grouping information so it is more easily understood ! Graphic Organizers ! Visual aids that help students organize information ! Reciprocal Teaching ! After training students in specific reading strategies and modeling these strategies, divide classes into small groups and assign individual students to take turns "teaching" and "modeling" the strategies in their small groups FOR STUDENTS ! Oral rather than written quizzes ! Alternative or modified assignments ! Extended time for tests and assignments ! Taking tests in a quiet room ! Assistive technology To the extent practical, LEP students will also be provided reasonable accommodations on state and standardized academic assessments. Homeless Students Appendix Helix Homeless Student Policy ensures the registration and continuity of education for homeless students, in accordance with the mandates of Federal Public Law 100-7, the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. The Appendix Helix Homeless Student Policy provides a definition of a “homeless student” and details the registration procedures for homeless students. Gifted and Talented Students The proposed high school will differentiate instruction and curriculum to meet the needs of all students, including G/T students. The coordination of gifted and regular education curriculum will be differentiated to meet the individualized benchmarks in place for all students. This can be accomplished through careful identification of G/T students, adequate professional development for teachers, and allocation of necessary resources. To meet the needs of G/T students, the school will assess student ability through tests and personalized assessments to devise an IEP for each student. Rural students, in particular, have cultural and economic implications that potentially impact student referrals for G/T programs prior to admission of the proposed high school. The school will work to overcome these challenges and ensure that all students are adequately evaluated for G/T classification. As students are identified as G/T, the teaching team will develop individualized standards for each child that will complement state and national standards and will monitor progress and issues. In addition to including annual academic growth, the IEP of each student in the proposed high school will include support for individual emotional needs. The school will emphasize enrichment, acceleration, higher-level thinking skills, multi- disciplinary content, abstract thinking skills, and a higher degree of complexity for all students, increasing expectations with the intention of raising student achievement. Resources will be allocated to meet the needs of G/T students, including but not limited to opportunities for academic competitions, consultations, independent study, interest-based workshops, Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 35 of 195
  • 36. mentorships, advanced placement classes, co-/extra-curricular activities emphasizing academics, enrichment class options, emotional support, and concurrent and dual enrollment options at LSU. The proposed high school will adhere to mandates by the state of Louisiana for staff development and teacher certification requirements for meeting the needs of G/T students. The G/T staff, along with the leadership of the school and external evaluators will provide a review of the G/T program as it is integrated in the regular education curriculum. Student Evaluation Assessments Helix High School: STEM will implement all assessments required by the Louisiana Accountability and Testing System. To qualitatively and quantitatively track studentsʼ academic progress, faculty and staff will use authentic assessments based on a studentʼs learning style and needs. Including the studentʼs voice is an important aspect of this assessment process. Students will take on the responsibility of providing formative and summative assessment evidence of their own learning. Performance will be measured daily, weekly, quarterly, and at the end of each year. Assessment tools will include observation and conversation, teacher-made tests, group projects that are “Presentations of Learning” (POLs), end-of course assessments, and standardized and/or high-stakes tests such as the “Interval Louisiana Evaluation and Assessment Program” (iLEAP) and “Graduation Exit Examination” (GEE). Students with special needs will learn in a full inclusion model and in accordance with their Individual Education Plans (IEPs). Using Data to Improve Instruction Authentic assessments will include peer and community-juried projects presented and displayed in school and community settings. An annual Capstone Scientific Research (CSR) project will provide students (individually in 9th and 10th grades and collaboratively in 11th and 12th grades) opportunities to demonstrate competencies and illustrate their understandings of both content and process. The content teachers will guide students through the inquiry process, which starts with framing the studentsʼ questions through the development of the research plans, continues with the collection and analysis of the data, and concludes with communication of the studentsʼ understandings to their mentors and peers. A late January CSR Symposium will provide a public forum in which the students will communicate their project findings to a larger audience. Outstanding capstone projects will be selected for competition at the annual regional and state science and engineering fairs. Assessment data from all sources will be collected and conveyed to the instructional staff on a monthly basis. Instructional staff, with the support of the school data collection personnel, will disaggregate the data so that they may continuously improve their instructional methods. Students with Exceptionalities Accommodations and modifications will be made for exceptional students in accordance with their IEPs and state and federal regulations. In addition to reviewing the IEP with the special education IEP facilitator (third party contract) and the parent(s) when appropriate, teachers will receive professional development on how to provide some of the more common accommodation strategies, such as: ! Administering oral rather than written quizzes ! Alternative or modified assignments ! Extended time for tests and assignments ! Administering tests in a quiet room Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 36 of 195
  • 37. ! Assistive technology Evaluation Frequent monitoring of progress, calls for the monitoring of progress at the school level, as well as the student level. Analysis of data can occur only if there exist methods of ongoing assessment which determine whether what is getting done in the school is getting done effectively, and ultimately positively affecting the academic progress of students. In line with Louisianaʼs collaboration with The Partnership for 21st Century Skills, Helix High School: STEM supports a balance of assessments. High-quality standardized testing along with effective classroom formative and summative assessments are what define authentic assessment which: ! Emphasizes useful feedback on student performance that is embedded into everyday learning ! Requires a balance of technology-enhanced, formative and summative assessments that measure student mastery of 21st century skills ! Enables development of portfolios of student work that demonstrate mastery of 21st century skills to educators and prospective employers ! Enables a balanced portfolio of measures to assess the educational systemʼs effectiveness at reaching high levels of student competency in 21st century skills Authentic 21st century assessments are the essential foundation of a 21st century education. Assessments must measure all five results that matter — core subjects; 21st century content; learning skills; ICT literacy; and life skills. To be effective, sustainable and affordable, assessments must use modern technologies to increase efficiency and timeliness. Standardized tests alone can measure only a few of the important skills and knowledge students should learn. A balance of assessments, including high-quality standardized testing along with effective classroom assessments, offers students a powerful way to master the content and skills central to success Lead Analyst Through its collaboration with Louisiana State University, Helix High School: STEM faculty will be guided through the collection and analysis of student assessment data. LSUʼs Department of Educational Research is a forerunner in educational measurement. Dr. Eugene Kennedy, Associate Professor in the department will be the expert who will be involved in training the staff about the triangulation of data that will provide an authentic projection of school performance. The principal will be the school leader who is responsible for guidance and facilitation of the assessments—and their alignment with Louisianaʼs goals in the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. Ultimately each advisor is the person that brings together all the data regarding a studentʼs performance to evaluate the accuracy of the studentʼs Individual Learning Plan. STRATEGIC ACHIEVEMENT PLAN The Executive Director and the Principal (once hired) will revise the Strategic Achievement Plan. In collaboration with the Director of Achievement, a detailed School Improvement Plan will be created once data is collected from the school. Helix High School: STEM plans to use the following data to make instructional and curriculum refinements as necessary: ! Daily individualized assessments of student progress (computerized) Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 37 of 195
  • 38. ! Weekly teacher sessions sharing student work ! End-of-term comprehensive exams review (review of questions) ! Mid-year "preliminary" exams in all core subjects, ! Yearly analysis of progress of curriculum and student performance ! Rigorous faculty self-reflection on their own learning, with each faculty member submitting a professional portfolio to the school's board of directors annually Under the direction of the school leader, classroom teachers will be responsible for monitoring the academic progress of each student in their team by interpreting data, working in teaching teams to plan and adjust the instructional program based on analysis of results, implement interventions, and monitor effectiveness. When the progress of the students is determined to be unsatisfactory, the leadership team will determine a plan of action that will include the allocation of additional resources to ensure the success of the students, as necessary. Students will be expected to take ownership of their own academic progress, understanding that it contributes to the overall success of the school. They will be involved in evaluating their own learning through participating in computerized assessments that provide individualized feedback, which will be accessible for students and teachers to review at any time. This information, coupled with standardized test results, and all other assessment data used in the school, will help students, teachers, and parents to a mutual understanding of student progress and will drive decisions for remediation or other support needed to improve student learning and the schoolʼs improvement overall. Students will also work on group and individual portfolios to demonstrate proficiency in core subjects. Students select all the work in their portfolios, choosing the work that best demonstrates their progress towards academic goals and mastery of the appropriate Louisiana Core Curriculum Standards, as well as the work of which they are most proud. In the event that the review findings show that the academic goals of the school are not being achieved, the leadership team will facilitate development of an extensive educational and operational review, which will determine what obstacles are inhibiting the success of students individually and collectively. Based on this review, teachers will shift the focus of their normal professional development, both the scheduled daily professional development time and the additional professional development and planning time throughout the year, to focus on improvement planning. REPORTING STUDENT PERFORMANCE Helix will provide reports each semester to the local school board and the community on progress toward the established annual goals as defined in the charter. A data report will be provided to these organizations and will describe where the school is in regard to the following: ! Student Academic Achievement ! Average Daily Attendance ! Promotion (course and grade) ! Teacher Retention ! Graduation Rate (year four and beyond) ! Parental Involvement ! Stakeholder Satisfaction Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 38 of 195
  • 39. Reporting to families will be conducted formally each quarter through student-led achievement conferences attended by family members and core teachers. These conferences will explore the academic and social progress of the student in terms of goals that will move the student toward proficiency on the state assessments and the progress made toward achieving these goals. PROMOTION AND GRADUATION POLICY HELIX WILL ADHERE TO THE LOUISIANA REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION: English 4 credits Mathematics 4 credits Science 4 credits Social Studies (Civics, Free Enterprise, World History, American History) 4 credits Physical Education and Health 2 credits Foreign Language 2 credits Arts 1 credit Electives 3 credits Students must pass the Louisiana State Graduation Exit Exam with a score of Basic or above. All students must complete grade-level portfolios and present portfolios at the end of each year In addition to the courses required for graduation, Helix High School: STEM will offer courses, such as fine arts, computer science, American history, civics, foreign language, and other history courses (world, western civilization, etc) that are required for students to qualify for TOPS. Students will have an opportunity to enroll in a sequence of courses that will prepare them for success in post-secondary education and careers. The core curriculum and electives for all students offer instruction based on the state standards. A prescribed sequence of courses helps students develop skills for the workplace and discover which career is best for them. Interdisciplinary English and Social Studies classes at each grade level will provide students with a sequential skills base through core literature and key turning points in history, guided by the state standards. The technology program offers students courses in network maintenance and multimedia production. Core courses include computer skills, web design, and multimedia production. Teachers will work diligently to meet the state academic standards in all required areas. Daily staff meetings will serve as a conduit for discussion of curriculum standards, interdisciplinary coordination, curriculum alignment, and examination of student work. All disciplines work to create course level assignments and assessments to meet the standards. Administration and teachers will look at data for standardized test scores and break down results by content clusters, quintile numbers, and state subgroup components. Supplemental courses during the breaks and small classes during the regular school year assist students with their daily work and with external exams such as the SAT and ACT. Lessons incorporate research skills, project development, and multimedia presentation skills. Science coursework is enhanced through the use of research projects, formal lab reports, mentors, and real-world investigation and projects. Students will be able to investigate career paths through the service learning project program, which will include site visits, interviews, and resume building. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 39 of 195
  • 40. The school will create a website where parents and students will be able to check teacher web pages for assignments and course goals. The site will encourage communication, inform stakeholders of graduation and course requirements, and provide information and resources including: Powerschool, a Pearson product that is used as a tool for parents to access daily grades, links to research engines, and links to the counselor. In addition to the tool for parents, Powerschool has custom report development tool design to meet the needs of educational data reporting, a web-based classroom management system designed for teachers, assessment analytics that reflects high-stakes exam scores and other measures specified by the school, a web-based, automated schedule builder that includes prerequisite checking and teacher recommendations, and other features that will be beneficial to the school operations. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 40 of 195
  • 41. Professional Development OVERVIEW Teachers and school leaders will participate in professional development focused on technology, project-based learning, 21st-century learning methods, and other topics as needed. Additionally, industry and university partners will work in teams with teachers at the schools to design student assignments that are aligned with university coursework and real- world industry practices, both of which will engage students in relevant lessons as the teachers monitor student progress toward meeting Grade Level Expectations. Professional Development Lead The Director of Achievement will oversee professional development and report directly to the Executive Director. S/he will be responsible for and involved in the collection and analysis of assessment data for student evaluations. The other primary responsibility of the Director of Achievement will be to develop, implement and evaluate professional development plans. Pre-Opening Professional Development The Appendix Helix Professional Development Schedule Prior to School Opening elaborates on the professional development teachers will undergo prior to the opening of the school (early July 2010, if approved). Four days of scheduled professional development will prepare teachers for what students will experience through project-based learning, digital portfolios, presentations of learning, and much more. This portion of the professional development schedule is designed to prepare teachers for team teaching, integrated delivery of coursework, and technology integration in the classroom, all of which are necessary for successful teaching in Helix High School: STEM. We envision that teachers will walk away from the training with a clear idea of what the students will experience, as well as the tools and techniques with which to execute the pedagogical strategies they have learned. In addition to the aforementioned professional development, teachers will participate in three days of project planning at the school site to work on team building, meet with special education teachers to discuss a plan for inclusion of students, and perform specific project planning. Ongoing Professional Development A proposed draft of a professional development schedule has been developed; see Appendix Professional Development Schedule to ensure that teachers have daily professional development sessions throughout the school year. These meetings can be found on the sample school schedule as the first item of the day. A sample weekly schedule for daily professional development is provided below: ! Monday: Collaborate with interdisciplinary team on project planning, scheduling, and student issues ! Tuesday: Teachers collaborate on solving issues at the school level ! Wednesday: The entire faculty meets to discuss school issues, plan, and collaborate ! Thursday: Teacher mentors meet with their mentees ! Friday: Teachers focus on Parent Communication, which can take place via emails and phone calls, notes, face-to-face meetings, and/or the teacherʼs digital portfolio As an all-inclusive school, students of mixed abilities will be an integrated part of the learning environment. With this approach, special education teachers and social workers will participate in all professional development activities in partnership with core subject and elective teachers. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 41 of 195
  • 42. During the staff professional development days at the beginning of the school year, the special education teacher will lead a day-long workshop, sharing specific strategies aimed at including all students in project teams throughout the school year. These workshops will include consultants, learning specialists, parents, and students with learning differences. We believe that the perspective these experts provide teachers will prove invaluable throughout the year. The professional development program provides training, support, and the opportunity for hands-on learning, so that teachers can understand project-based delivery, technology integration, creation of digital portfolios, presentations of learning, and other activities that will be required of their students. All teachers will be required to experience the challenges the school offers their students, so they have a better perspective of the difficulty and challenges that the students might face. The professional development prior to the schoolʼs opening provides an opportunity for teachers to work in interdisciplinary groups and design projects based on grade-level expectations that the students must reach. Teachers will have time to understand the most effective uses of the technology that will be used in the classroom as a tool for students to complete projects. This is necessary to experience prior to the school opening, giving teachers a solid grounding in the use of the tools, resources, and plans needed to implement the unique curriculum. The three additional days of professional development will allow teachers to reflect on what they learned and design lessons for the students. Ongoing assessment, reflection, and retooling are essential in providing a relevant professional development program. Multiple assessment methods will be utilized to help improve the program throughout the year. These methods include informal feedback from teachers, formal surveys, self-assessments, teacher learning journals, and a school-wide self- study. The school data manager will be responsible for collecting assessment information and compiling a report for the benefit of the Director of Achievement, the Executive Director and the Helix Board of Directors. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 42 of 195
  • 43. Student Recruitment, Enrollment, and Admissions The school seeks to enroll students who reflect the diversity of the surrounding community. The proposed school will not require entrance exams or charge a fee, and there will be no discrimination against any student on the basis of ethnicity, national origin, gender, disability, or any other ground that would be unlawful. Admission of students will not be limited on the basis of intellectual ability, measures of achievement or aptitude, status as a handicapped person, gender, creed, national origin, religion, ancestry or any other basis that would not be permitted, as with any public school or school district. Student selection will be an open and carefully monitored process. A detailed recruitment plan can be found in Appendix Student Enrollment, along with admission requirements for the school, tentative dates for the application period, enrollment deadlines, lottery dates and procedures, waiting list and re-enrollment procedures, marketing and recruitment information, and a sample enrollment form and recruitment flyer. Helix is aware of state and federal regulations applicable to schools concerning church-state issues and will comply with these laws. School Climate and Culture Proposed School Calendar 2009-2010 April - May Teacher Preparation & Training on Saturdays Monday, June 21 – Friday, July 2 Student Orientation Monday, July 5 4th of July Holiday – School Closed Faculty: Individual Student Learning Plans Tuesday, July 6 – Wednesday, July 7 Students: No School Faculty Advisor/Student/Parent Thursday, July 8 – Friday, July 9 Conferences and Student Individual Learning Plan Presentations Monday, July 12 Quarter 1 Begins Mid-Quarter 1 Reports – Faculty Monday, August 9 Advisor/Student/Parent Conferences to Update Student Individual Learning Plans Monday, September 6 Labor Day Holiday – School Closed Wednesday, September 15 End of Quarter 1 Review Thursday, September 16 – Wednesday, Fall Break September 29 Thursday, September 30 Quarter 2 Begins Mid-Quarter 2 Reports – Faculty Friday, November 5 Advisor/Student/Parent Conferences to Update Student Individual Learning Plans Wednesday, November 24 - Friday, November Thanksgiving Holiday – No School 26 Monday, December 20 - Wednesday, December Student Presentations of Learning 22 (Based on Coursework from Qtrs. 1 & 2) Thursday, December 23 - Wednesday, January 5 Winter Break Thursday, January 6 Quarter 3 Begins Monday, January 17 Martin Luther King Holiday – No School Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 43 of 195
  • 44. Mid-Quarter 3 Reports – Faculty Friday, February 11 Advisor/Student/Parent Conferences to Update Student Individual Learning Plans Monday, March 7 - Wednesday, March 9 Mardi Gras Holiday – No School Wednesday, March 23 End of Quarter 3 Reviews Thursday, March 24 - Wednesday, April 6 Spring Break Thursday, April 7 Quarter 4 Begins Friday, April 22 Spring Holiday – No School Mid-Quarter 4 Reports – Faculty Friday, May 13 Advisor/Student/Parent Conferences to Update Student Individual Learning Plans Monday, May 30 Memorial Day Observance – No School Student Presentations of Learning Wednesday, June 15 - Friday, June 17 (Based on Coursework from Qtrs. 3 & 4) Monday, June 20 – Friday, July 15 Summer Break BREAKDOWN OF DETAILS OF THE SCHOOL YEAR FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL: JULY 6, 2010 SCHOOL DAY END TIME: 5:30PM HOURS IN SCHOOL DAY: 9 HOURS NUMBER OF INSTRUCTIONAL MINUTES 360 MINUTES PER DAY: NUMBER OF INSTRUCTIONAL SCHOOL 190 DAYS PER YEAR DAYS PER YEAR: NUMBER OF BEFORE SCHOOL HOURS DEVOTED ZERO TO ACADEMICS: NUMBER OF AFTER AN AVERAGE OF FIFTY HOURS PER SCHOOL HOURS DEVOTED QUARTER TO ACADEMICS: NUMBER OF DAYS DEVOTED TO STAFF 20 DAYS, MINIMUM DEVELOPMENT DURING SCHOOL YEAR: NUMBER OF DAYS DEVOTED TO STAFF 7 DAYS, MINIMUM DEVELOPMENT PRIOR TO SCHOOL OPENING: Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 44 of 195
  • 45. Sample Daily Schedule The school day will be extended to support a project and inquiry-based learning curriculum tied to community and corporate partner participation. Classes will satisfy the Carnegie unit requirements and will be team-taught and integrated across content areas. Daily faculty meeting time will ensure that the professional staff has sufficient opportunity to coordinate activities and organize integrated learning opportunities. A typical schedule for the 9th and 10th grades is presented below. The highlighted sections for math and science, as well as for English and social studies, indicate an integrated approach to learning these subjects. These courses will be taught as a block, and students will reach Grade Level Expectations through integrated, project-based methods of learning. The example below shows a five-day cycle. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 8:30am – 9:15am Faculty Faculty Faculty Faculty Faculty Meeting Meeting Meeting Meeting Meeting 9:30 am- 10:30am Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics 10:35am – 11:35am Science Science Science Science Science 11:40am – 12:40pm Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective 12:40pm – 1:20pm LUNCH LUNCH LUNCH LUNCH LUNCH 1:20pm – 2:20pm English English English English English 2:25pm – 3:25pm Social Social Social Social Social Studies Studies Studies Studies Studies 3:30pm – 4:30pm Humanities Humanities Humanities Humanities Humanities 4:30pm – 5:30pm Health/PE SIG Health/PE SIG Advising CULTURE AND CLIMATE DEVELOPMENT In order to develop a culture of collaboration, rigor, and authentic projects, all parties – students, teachers, parents, and leadership – must take ownership of the school community. The school culture is built over time through various points of contact, as outlined below. Information Sessions: Each year, as new students are recruited, the school will host at least three information sessions. The meetings will inform potential students about the vision behind the school, answer any questions, and invite the community to participate in the process. Welcome Session for New Students: Once students have been accepted into the program, the school will host a welcome reception at which new students have an opportunity to meet their teachers, view example projects, and ask questions about the schoolʼs culture, curriculum, expectations, etc. Home Visit: Each faculty member (administration, support staff, and teachers) will be assigned to an advisory group. To reach out to families and build personal relationships with them, advisors will visit studentsʼ homes during the summer. Summer Bridge: A month before the school year begins, new students will participate in a two-week introduction to the school. During Summer Bridge, students will create their digital portfolios, work on introductory projects, and make connections with their classmates. School Retreat: A month after the school year begins, the entire school community will spend two or three days off-site at a retreat facility, having fun, working in teams, and making connections across grades. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 45 of 195
  • 46. Community Meetings: Every two or three weeks, the entire school community will gather to participate in a community meeting. These experiences will include guest speakers, talent shows, presentations of key projects, and more. Frequent Staff Collaboration: Teachers will participate in daily professional development meetings, collaborating on important issues such as projects, school culture, and student issues. This frequent collaboration will help to build an authentic participatory culture. Teacher Websites and Newsletters: Every teacher be strongly encouraged to create their own website with class news and important dates, to encourage communication between the classroom and the home. This information will also be dispersed through regular newsletters, which will be sent to studentsʼ homes. Weekly Advisory Sessions: To ensure that all students have a personal connection to the school and receive individualized attention, they will have advisors with whom they will meet on a weekly basis. During their meetings, students will discuss academic and personal issues with their advisors. Community Participation: Whenever possible members of the community are invited to participate in the learning experience. These opportunities to collaborate will include, but are not limited to: ! Partnering in projects ! Serving on panels for presentations of learning ! Attending exhibitions of student work ! Arranging job shadowing experiences ! Engaging in service learning opportunities ! Serving on the parental advisory committee Extra- and Co-Curricular Activities The climate and culture of the high school is modeled from successful schools, primarily the High Tech High (HTH) network of charter schools in California. HTH was created to combat student disengagement and low academic achievement. They have been successful in accomplishing both of these goals by creating a culture of valued relationships between students and adults, fostering the creative talents of students, and delivering curriculum in such a way that students can learn through hands-on, engaging classroom projects. To develop a similar climate and culture to HTH, Helix has worked and will continue to work closely with HTH staff and leadership to gain insight on building and maintaining the cultural and climatic aspects of a successful school. Helix will continue to build partnerships with local institutions of higher learning including Louisiana State University, Southern University, and Baton Rouge Community College to assist in reaching the goal for all students to be accepted into the university upon graduation and be prepared for non-remedial college courses. In order to build a culture of high expectations for college readiness, the school will partner with these institutions to provide opportunities for its students to have meaningful interactions with faculty and students and experiences on university campuses. These universities may offer opportunities such as collaborative projects and use of resources and facilities. In order to prepare students early on for the challenges of the workplace, Helix High School: STEM will make every effort for the high school climate to reflect that of a real, adult-world work environment. To do this, Helix will seek partnerships with various industries to design Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 46 of 195
  • 47. projects that require students to solve community issues. Companies can then send volunteers to provide expertise to teachers and students on the issues that they are facing and consult students on proposed solutions. Modeling the culture of HTH, the high school will have many opportunities for extra- and co- curricular activities. An example of an extra-curricular activity for students at Helix High School: STEM would be the courses to prepare students for the Shell Oil Eco-marathon Americas, for example. The Shell Eco-marathon Americas is a challenge for high school and university students to design, build, and test fuel-efficient vehicles that travel the farthest distance using the least amount of fuel. All extra-curricular activities will be voluntary. An example of co-curricular activities in the high school will be Special Interest Groups, or SIGs. SIGs will be scheduled in one-hour blocks, two days a week. Teachers will design the SIGs according to their interests, and students will schedule the SIGs that they are most interested in taking. SIGs will reinforce learning in the classroom and will be relevant to industry practices in relevant fields. Dress Code The dress code section is provided below. Students will not be required to purchase a uniform for the high school. However, there is a dress code policy; see Appendix Helix Student Discipline Policy. The following information has been prepared to help acquaint students and parents with the rules and guidelines that are necessary for the high school to operate and function smoothly. It is the studentʼs responsibility to become familiar with the contents and to follow the rules as stated. All students must wear the school ID Card. The card must be worn on the front of the torso, either on a lanyard no longer than three inches above the waist or clipped or pinned to the garmentʼs collar, pocket or lapel. If a sweater or jacket is worn, the ID still must be visible on the front of the outer garment. Failure to adhere to these requirements will result in disciplinary actions at the discretion of the school principal. The dress of the students will be clean and modest, as detailed below. The following regulations will apply to both male and female students, unless otherwise specified, during school time, school dances, school-sponsored trips, when participating in service learning opportunities, and to and from school on school buses. Formal dances are the only exception to these rules. 1. Skirts, dresses, pants, jeans and walking shorts are acceptable, provided they have a finished hem or cuff. This eliminates any garment with visible ragged edges and bottoms that are not hemmed. All walking shorts, skorts, skirts, dresses, and culottes must be not more than four (4) inches above the knee. Holes in clothing above the knee are not allowed. 2. The following garments are not acceptable: biking type shorts, spandex , tights (including tight fitting caprice pants), leggings, leotards, gym shorts, boxer shorts, sleep wear, soccer shorts, and sweat pants. 3. Clothing and/or jewelry advocating or advertising drugs, sex, alcohol, tobacco, profanity, illegal substances or activities, or questionable subject matter or imagery may not be worn. 4. Shirts and blouses for both male and female students must cover the top of the shoulder. Tank tops, muscle shirts, bare back dresses or tops, strapless dresses, camisoles, spaghetti strap dresses, off-the-shoulder apparel, and other similar types are prohibited. 5. Necklines must be modest. See-through shirts, blouses, and pants are not permitted. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 47 of 195
  • 48. Midriffs, halter tops, cropped shirts, and other similar types are prohibited. Tops or bottoms allowing any mid-section skin to be seen are prohibited. 6. Underwear of any kind may not be worn as outerwear. These items include but are not limited to undershirts, long underwear, boxer shorts, etc. 7. All footwear must have soles and be well secured on the foot. Flip-flops, slippers, beach type thongs, etc. are prohibited. 8. Clothes must be worn as designed. Clothes may not be worn inside out, backwards, or loosely fitted about the waist. If necessary, a belt should be worn to prevent shorts and pants falling below the waistline. 9. Headwear such as caps, hats, sweat bands, visors, and bandannas must not be worn in any building on campus. Exception: Religious headwear may be worn when approved by the administration. 10. Sunglasses may not be worn in any building on campus. 11. Large chains may not be worn in any building on campus. DISCIPLINE RULES AND PROCEDURES Helix High School: STEM has a standard discipline policy that seeks to protect the health and safety of students and staff. The policy is in compliance with federal and state laws and has sanctions that escalate from stern warnings to expulsion, depending on the nature of the violation. Accommodations are made for students with learning disabilities. To review the complete discipline policy, please refer to Appendix Helix Student Discipline Policy. Parent and Community Engagement Parental Involvement If approved, Helix will seek parental representation on the governing board of Helix High School: STEM. Just as Helix High School: STEM sees the importance in giving students a voice in demonstrating learning, we believe that giving parents and the community a voice in the school will result in a successful school with the firm support of stakeholders. Parents will be encouraged to attend all available town meetings, information sessions, and student demonstrations of learning. Parents will be involved in quarterly student-led conferences. The purpose of this student-led conference is to understand their studentʼs academic and social progress each quarter. The achievement conferences will provide parents with information on goals that will move their student toward proficiency on the state assessments and the progress made toward achieving these goals. Parent Complaints If a parent, student, staff member, or other individual or group is not satisfied with a school decision or policy, that person will be referred to Appendix Helix Parent Complaint Policy. This policy provides a list of procedures to address the complaint satisfactorily in a timely and respectful manner. Parental Evaluation Parental involvement in the school will be encouraged and expected for student academic evaluation and planning. Parents will be invited to observe student classes and attend student Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 48 of 195
  • 49. presentations of learning and will be invited to student exhibitions. They will be encouraged to assist in the planning of these events as a volunteer of the school. Examples of other volunteer opportunities for parents include attending field-trips, volunteering on the premises of the school, or for co-curricular activities to provide hands-on help to students on projects, such as the Shell Eco-marathon Americas competition. Helix High School: STEM realizes and that parents will vary in levels of involvement in the schools based on their personal and professional situations. There will be no limit on volunteer time for parents, or will the school place restrictions on the type of volunteering in which parents may participate. Parents will be encouraged to recommend ideas on how they might best volunteer in the school; approval of such recommendations will be decided by the school leadership and in some cases by the governing board. Part of the role of teachers at Helix High School: STEM is to build a strong relationship with students and their family. Prior to school opening, advisors will be asked to meet with families of the students they are mentoring. This adds to the design principal of personalization that is found throughout the culture of the school. Parents may inspect teacher lesson plans for each quarter. All teachers will be expected to have parent contact information available at all times and to contact parents on a regular basis to build a strong relationship and a culture of respect and understanding. Community Involvement The Helix Board of Directors strongly believes that the public needs to reengage with public education. School leadership and the Helix Board will seek meaningful partnerships with community-based organizations, businesses, and post-secondary institutions. Community-based organizations in the region are active in a variety of public school improvement activities. For example, the school will seek to partner with Forum 35ʼs Public Education Project to provide mentors and tutors in the high school, and to bring community members on school tours of the high school to benefit student learning, improve academic achievement, and provide another adult connection in studentsʼ lives. Helix has been in conversation with businesses such as Red Stick Studios, which upon opening in November will be the largest studio for digitally enhancing film outside New York and California, and others located in our community that are interested in becoming involved in the schools in a variety of ways. These ways include, but are not limited to: sites for school field-trips, providing volunteer experts to work in the classroom as content specialists on student projects, and hosting students on job shadowing days and service learning projects. Helix has received a tremendous response from companies around the Baton Rouge region and, if the proposed schools are approved, Helix High School: STEM will begin to formalize partnerships and plan for a strong industry presence within the schools. Helix High School: STEM is building partnerships with local institutions of higher learning, including Louisiana State University, Southern University, and Baton Rouge Community College. These partnerships will help to create a collegiate learning environment within the school. For example, Helix High School: STEM is partnering with LSU to provide expertise in the classroom, align university coursework with high school classes, and provide high school students access to the university campus. Colleges and centers at LSU, such as the College of Engineering, Basic Sciences and the Cain Center for Scientific, Technological, Engineering and Mathematical Literacy will partner with Helix High School: STEM to align academic content at the high school with expectations of student learning upon entering the university in the freshman year. This is an authentic outreach effort by the university to the high school, as it will result in students entering the university prepared for the “next step” in subject areas. Upon approval of Helix High School: STEM, LSU faculty will also provide academic expertise to high school teachers, especially in relation to the complex projects that students will work Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 49 of 195
  • 50. on during their senior year. These types of partnerships will help students make personal connections to university life, familiarizing students with the academic environment they will experience after high school. During their junior and senior years, students who have reached a specified level of academic proficiency will be offered the option to participate in certain dual- or concurrent-enrollment courses. The early access to university coursework will put high school students on a fast track to graduating from the university, thereby encouraging them to apply for enrollment in the university and promoting retention once accepted. Universities have a plethora of resources for students, such as library resources, the student recreational center, the student union and bookstore, and laboratories for learning. Helix High School: STEM will work to collaborate with these institutions to share resources and provide opportunities for university/high school collaborative projects, presentations, and events. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 50 of 195
  • 51. GOVERNANCE, LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT Governance Composition of Governing Board The Helix Board will serve as the governing body for the proposed school. Members include representatives from industry and content specialties, the non-profit community, government, education reform organization, donors, and the private sector. Diversity is also reflected as well along the lines of regional representation, gender, race, ethnicity, and socio-economic background. The Helix Board will continue to recruit additional board members and will include parent representation from Helix High School: STEM upon opening. The governing board currently has seven members of the board. Positions that are currently secured on the board are board President, Treasurer and Secretary. Additionally, the board may elect a Vice President at any point in the future. The board is comprised of the following members: Board Member Skills and Experiences Arthur R. Cooper Arthur currently serves as CEO of the LSU System Research and Technology Foundation, which focuses on helping Louisiana universities commercialize their technology. He is also the Executive Director of the Louisiana Emerging Technology Center and is responsible for the operation of the Baton Rouge Life Science incubator. He previously served as director of Business, Retention, and Assistance Services for the Louisiana Department of Economic Development; as such he worked closely with the Small Business Development Centers, local chambers of commerce, micro enterprise development centers, and local economic developers. Arthur is a Baton Rouge native with 16 years experience in the practice of law, including extensive work in intellectual property issues. He has worked as a design engineer, CEO of a startup biotech food company and a managing partner of a law firm. He has a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Louisiana State University and a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Louisiana State University Law Center. Chadler Cornett Mr. Cornett serves as the Director of Business Development for the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, where he drives economic development initiatives and new business attraction efforts. He works with state and local officials, specifically East Baton Rouge Parish government, utilities, and community foundations, to communicate strengths and resources to companies and consultants seeking locations for new facilities. He also works closely with the State of Louisiana and existing business leaders to support quality job growth, new capital investment, and positive economic development policy for East Baton Rouge Parish. His recruitment accomplishments this year include a 300-job Quality Assurance Center for EA Sports, a 1500-job headquarters expansion for The Shaw Group, and a new corporate headquarters for Albemarle Corporation. Previously, Mr. Cornett served as the Director of Business Development on the regional business development staff of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, leading a national recruitment program. He has also served as the Assistant Vice President of Economic Development for a Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 51 of 195
  • 52. regional organization in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, where he was responsible for project management and marketing business development services. He has worked as a Research Associate with the Center for Community and Economic Development at the University of Southern Mississippi. Mr. Cornett received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration, with a specialty in Finance, and a Masterʼs of Science degree in Economic Development, both from the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. He received his Economic Development Finance Professional designation in 2007 and is currently attending Louisiana State University, pursuing a Masterʼs degree in Business Administration. James Gilmore, Jr. Dr. Gilmore holds a Bachelor of Arts degree with a concentration in Political Science from Southern University, a Master of Public Administration degree from Louisiana State University, and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Human Resource Development with a concentration in Leadership Development from Louisiana State University. Dr. Gilmore is a certified Professional in Human Resources (PHR) from the Society of Human Resource Managers, as well as certified as an Executive in State and Local Government (Fannie Mae Fellow) from the Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government. Currently, Dr. Gilmore is the Director of Volunteer Louisiana in the Office of the Lieutenant Governor. In this role, he is responsible for promoting an ethic of service throughout the state by creating and implementing strategic volunteer initiatives and supporting efforts among nonprofits, faith-based organizations, and public entities. Prior to joining the Office of the Lieutenant Governor, Dr. Gilmore was the Vice President of Louisiana Housing Finance Agency where he was responsible for the coordination of joint ventures and special programs related to housing with federal, state, and local governmental agencies. In that position, he was also responsible for the design of programs to satisfy the housing and support service needs of Louisianaʼs low- and moderate-income residents with use of Community Development Block Grant Dollars. He was responsible for designing and implementing all educational training and workforce development programs. Throughout the years, Dr. Gilmore has held positions such as Policy Advisor of the Office of the Governor, Human Resources Manager for USG Corporation, President of the Louisiana State University Public Administration Student Association and President of the Southern University Sophomore Class. He is a skilled public speaker, speechwriter, and grant writer. He has worked on such projects as the Madison Parish Redevelopment Planning; Southern University and A&M College Strategic Planning; Southern University Recruitment and Retention Planning; Southern University Office of Research and Strategic Initiatives Planning; Southern University Alumni Center Finance Planning & Implementation; Louisiana Board of Regents Educational/Community Assessment of the Delta Parishes; and Governorʼs Office of Womenʼs Policy Strategic Alignment Project. Pastor Raymond Jetson, Treasurer of the Board Pastor Jetson has been the Pastor at Star Hill Church in Baton Rouge since 1994. As pastor, he provides leadership that has transformed a congregation of 300 people into a dynamic body of more than 1,500 spiritual entrepreneurs. From 2006 – 2008, Pastor Jetson was the Chief Executive Officer of the Louisiana Family Recovery Corps where he led the development and implementation of an innovative model of humanitarian service for assisting individuals impacted by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. He has also served as the Deputy Secretary for the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, the Chief Operating Officer of the largest state agency with 12,000 employees and a $7B budget. As the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Citizens with Developmental Disabilities at the Louisiana Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 52 of 195
  • 53. Department of Health and Hospitals, Pastor Jetson developed innovative programming to provide comprehensive individualized supports and services for people with developmental disabilities to allow them to live in their own homes or with their families in their own community. From 1984 through 1999 Pastor Jetson served as the State Representative for District 61 in the Louisiana House of Representatives, where he was a member of the Appropriations Committee, the Chairman of Transportation and Public Works Committee, the Vice Chairman of Health and Welfare Committee, the Chairman of the Legislative Black Caucus, the author of Performance-Based Budget Legislation, the Co-author of Education Trust Fund Legislation, and the author of legislation creating access to services for more than 1,000 individuals with developmental disabilities. Bryan Jones, President of the Board Mr. Jones manages public relations and governmental affairs for HNTB Corporation, a national engineering, architecture and planning firm based in Louisiana and Mississippi. Currently, he oversees public outreach campaigns on numerous civil infrastructure projects, including two proposed toll interstate highways in Louisiana, the $4B Baton Rouge Loop project and the $2B Lafayette Regional Expressway. He is also responsible for community outreach for the South Louisiana Submerged Roads Program in New Orleans, a program to repair more than 75 streets in metropolitan New Orleans damaged by Hurricane Katrina. Prior to joining HNTB Corporation, Mr. Jones managed public outreach for the $5 billion Louisiana TIMED Program, the stateʼs largest infrastructure program. Following Hurricane Katrina, he served then-Governor Kathleen Blanco as a member of her communications team. Bryan also interned for former U.S. Senator John Breaux in his Baton Rouge and Washington offices. Mr. Jones is a 2005 graduate of Louisiana State University where he majored in Political Communication. A native of Pointe Coupee Parish, he and a small group founded Public Action for Change in Education (PACE) to raise awareness of the plight of the public education system in Pointe Coupee. The organization was successful in supporting and electing a new majority of the parish school board. In 2008, Bryan joined the board of ADVANCE Baton Rouge (ABR) and in 2009 became a founding board member of ADVANCE Innovative Education. Jane Metcalf, Secretary of the Board Ms. Metcalf holds a Masterʼs degree in Education from New York University, a Bachelorʼs degree in Computer Science from Louisiana State University, and a Bachelorʼs degree in English from Arizona State University. In addition to her education, she has a Project Management Certificate from the Management Services Institute at Louisiana State University. Ms. Metcalf is a national consultant for schools to assist with technology planning, implementation and remediation. Prior to working as a consultant, Ms. Metcalf worked as the Director of Technology at St. Josephʼs Academy in Baton Rouge to undergird the technology flash with stable, reliable services. She has extensive knowledge of technology needs in education and has created strategic plans for organizations. She has worked as an Adjunct Instructor and System Manager at LSU and has acted as a consultant to numerous school districts wishing to enhance their technology services. Ms. Metcalf began her career as a teacher in the Los Angeles City School District where she was chosen for district wide curriculum redesign committee and for district wide textbook Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 53 of 195
  • 54. selection committee. While in Los Angeles, Ms. Metcalf was also the creator of innovative, future-looking class offerings. Roster of Key Contacts The Appendix Helix High School: STEM Roster of Key Contacts specifies information for all governing board members and key administrative leaders for the school. Board Resumes The Appendix Board Member Resumes provides resumes for each of the Helix board members. Involvement in Application Design Application & Design: In collaboration with the board, a committee of experts from around the nation was formed to provide insight on the most innovative practices in public education today. This committee consisted of national funders, organizations that have been successful with the design of innovative schools, and successful school leaders. Additionally, several Louisiana certified teachers participated in the discussion of the design with the national design committee. Development and Implementation of the School: In the development of the school, Jane Metcalf and Arthur Cooper are going to play an integral role in advising the school on information systems and technology infrastructure needed to maintain the one-to-one laptop program, as well as other technology consulting. Mr. Cooper will also keep the board and school personnel abreast of technology resource opportunities for the high school. Throughout the development stages of Helix High School: STEM, Chad Cornett is assisting in identifying business partnerships for the school and providing initial conversations to business representatives to garner interest. Mr. Cornettʼs responsibilities at the Baton Rouge Area Chamber include business outreach in all parishes that encompass the greater Baton Rouge region. Additionally, Mr, Cornett is the Director of the Baton Rouge Area Digital Industries Consortium whose mission is to attract digital media and high-tech companies to the area. During implementation of the school, Bryan Jones and Pastor Jetson will strategically plan and assist in the implementation of recruiting the targeted student population to the school. Mr. Jones has access to the rural parish of Pointe Coupee and he is extremely active in expanding educational opportunities for students who live there. Pastor Jetson is the Pastor at Star Hill Church, located in north Baton Rouge. Like Mr. Jones, Pastor Jetson is passionate about communicating high quality educational options to students who are located in his community. They both will play a major role in recruitment and advocacy for the first years of operation. Pastor Jetson and James Gilmore will provide opportunities during the implementation for volunteers in the community to participate, and become stakeholders in the school. Both Pastor Jetson and Mr. Gilmore are active in the community and their collective network of volunteers will be a beneficial resource during the implementation stage of the school. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES OF THE GOVERNING BOARD Bylaws See Appendix Helix Network of Educational Choices Bylaws for a description of the intended policies and procedures that will be used by the nonprofit governing board to govern the proposed school. The bylaws include officer positions designated and the manner in which members of the governing body are recruited and selected, the manner in which vacancies on the governing body will be filled, the term for which members of the governing body will serve and the committees of the corporation, and proof of compliance with Louisiana Open Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 54 of 195
  • 55. Meetings Act. Code of Ethics The bylaws also describe the policy and procedures for complying with the Louisiana Code of Ethics. Public Records The bylaws also describe the policy and procedures for complying with the Louisiana Public Records law (LA-R.S. 44:1 et seq.). Dissolution This statement acknowledges that in the event of dissolution of the charter school, the board of Helix will cooperate fully with LDE and SBESE procedures for the transfer of students and student records and for the disposition of school assets. Board Meetings Appendix 2009-2010 Helix Meeting Schedule includes proposed dates, times, and location of annual and monthly meetings. Board meetings are to be scheduled on the second Monday of each month, from 4:00pm – 5:00pm, and will be held in the Shaw Center for the Arts. The board is scheduled to meet a minimum of 10 months per year, with the annual meeting occurring each September. Appendix - Helix Network for Educational Choices Bylaws includes details regarding the manner in which board meeting proceedings will comply with the Louisiana Open Meeting Act. Appendix 2009-2010 Helix Meeting Schedule provides a detailed schedule of board meetings from the present until the beginning of the second school year. The method of public notice can be found in Appendix Helix Network for Educational Choices Bylaws and is in accordance with the Louisiana Open Meetings Act. Board Training Appendix Adams & Reese Board Training Syllabus 2009-2010 provides a syllabus for the Helix Board of Directors training conducted by Adams and Reese, LLP, a premier legal firm that advises and provides training to charter school boards throughout the Southern Region of the United States. Practicing lawyers will deliver board training at each monthly board meeting on topics in line with Louisiana legislation and SBESE Policy. In this manner, the Board of Directors will gain the knowledge necessary to hold efficient, active, and high- functioning meetings that will enable the leaders of the proposed school to focus more time on students and school performance. Board members are expected to attend 75% of the trainings. Recruitment and Succession of Nonprofit Governing Board The Helix board includes a diverse set of individuals with experience and practical work experience in the areas of education, operations and executive management in public, for- profit and non-profit environments, community development and law. See Appendix Board Member Resumes for additional detail on individual board membersʼ areas of expertise. The board seeks to retain this broad level of experience over the duration of its existence. Every board member is responsible for the recruitment of new board members, as they rotate off of the board. In the event of a vacancy, board members will use their extensive personal and professional networks within the region to identify individuals who would be willing to serve the public good and to commit the time required to support the board in maintaining its diverse range of professional expertise and experience. Final selection of new members of the board will be a result of a majority vote by the existing board members. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 55 of 195
  • 56. Effective Governance and Organizational Leadership Criteria: Criterion: Governance The school demonstrates effective governance and organizational leadership: ! The governance board bylaws reflect the governance processes described in the charter. They have reasonable terms regarding financial management, personnel decisions, and oversight of educational program and school safety ! Board meetings occur on a regular basis, comply with all aspects of the Brown Act, provide an opportunity for public comment, and are recorded in written minutes ! The Board adheres to reasonable written conflict of interest policies and makes decisions free from conflict of interest by disqualifying any Board member from voting on a particular matter that would materially affect him or her ! The Board adopts reasonable written policies to resolve internal and external conflicts and complaints ! The Board maintains clearly written minutes that indicate attendance and a general description of all matters proposed, discussed, and/or decided. Minutes indicate that the board regularly achieves a quorum and is able to progress through issues from one meeting to the next ! The board implements an accountability process for the school leader ! The board establishes regular opportunities for stakeholders to address administration and board (measured by parent meetings, surveys, etc) ! Board or school administration provides regular public reports on schoolʼs progress towards achieving its goals to school community ! Board and school administration foster a school culture conducive to student learning and staff professional growth (as measured by perception data) RELATIONSHIP OF GOVERNING BOARD WITH SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE LEADERS AND PARTNERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS Governing and policy-making authority and fiduciary responsibility for the school will rest with the Helix board. The Helix board will provide oversight to the Executive Director, who in turn will oversee the Principal and Director of Achievement. The Executive Director will provide reports and updates to the board on the operations of the school, while the school leader monitors the day-to-day operations of school. The Board will conduct its business at regular, monthly meetings and at committee meetings, as necessary. Relationships with partnership organizations will be managed by the Executive Director. Services provided by these organizations will be on a contract basis, periodically reviewed by the Executive Director under the oversight of the Helix Board. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 56 of 195
  • 57. School Leadership and Personnel Management ORGANIZATIONAL CHART The Helix Board of Directors will act as the governing body of the school. For day-to-day management of the school, the school principal is the lead authority in the school. The Executive Directorʼs role will be devoted to community involvement, management of contractual agreements with external organizations, and reporting to the board, as necessary. The Principal will be, foremost, the instructional leader of the school, supervising all instructional staff. S/he will be charged with the operation of the school, personnel management, and school site management. All social workers and ancillary staff will report directly to the principal. The Director of Achievement, reporting to the Executive Director, will monitor instruction to determine professional development needs, and to provide input on student evaluation and assessment plans to ensure student academic success in the school. The Director of Achievement will work directly with the Principal to assess teaching and professional development needs, but teachers and staff will not report directly to the Director of Achievement. The Director of Achievement will work collaboratively with the Principal to design, develop and implement student improvement and professional development plans. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 57 of 195
  • 58. Employment STAFFING CHART Below is a chart demonstrating Instructional and Non-Instructional personnel, identifying the number of classroom teachers, teaching aides or assistants, specialty teachers, and support and operational staff. Instructional Staff FTE Salary Range Master Teacher 2 $51,000 - $56,000 Subject Area and Electives Teacher 5 $45,000 - $50,000 School Social Worker 0.5 $21,500 - $24,000 Special Education Teacher 1 $48,000 – $53,000 Non-Instructional Staff FTE Executive Director 0.5 $55,000 - $60,000 School Leader 1 $85,000 - $90,000 School Secretary 0.5 $14,000 - $16,500 Data Manager 0.5 $14,000 - $16,500 Technology/Data 0.5 $26,500 - $29,000 JOB DESCRIPTIONS Descriptions of key positions are included in the appendices. RECRUITMENT Upon approval of the charter application, the Executive Director will begin the recruitment and selection process for the school principal. See Appendix Job Descriptions for Helix High School STEM for details about the qualifications and experience level sought for the school principal. The Executive Director will work in collaboration with East Baton Rouge Parish Schools and other organizations to identify a pool of qualified candidates for the principal position. Once the leadership of the school is hired, the Executive Director and Principal will work to implement the recruitment plan for the staff, according to the recruitment schedule (see Appendix Start-up plan). These recruitment efforts include collaboration with the authorizing district, community presentations, information sessions, flyers, and advertisements in local, regional, and national publications. Helix will also work with the Transitions to Teaching program and Teach for America to ensure a diverse applicant pool. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 58 of 195
  • 59. Selection Helix will engage applicants in a multi-phase interview process that will require applicants to demonstrate desired competencies through: ! Completion of Habermanʼs Star Urban Administrator Questionnaire ! Helix interviews with Executive Director, Principal, and others as determined by the Executive Director of Helix ! Performance Task (demonstration of project-based and team approach to teaching for integrated delivery of curriculum) Upon completion of interviews, due diligence will be completed through reference checks and a background check. Development Helix will ensure leadership and teaching faculty are well supported through rigorous, ongoing professional development opportunities. This includes pre-opening, ongoing, and reflective professional development as articulated in the previous section in this application labelled “Professional Development”. Teachers and school leaders will participate in professional development focused on technology, project-based learning, 21st-century learning methods, and other topics as needed. Additionally, industry and university partners will work in teams with teachers at the schools to design student assignments that are aligned with university coursework and real-world industry practices, both of which will engage students in relevant lessons as the teachers monitor student progress toward meeting Grade Level Expectations. Teachers will work with the Director of Achievement to develop, implement and evaluate professional development plans. Evaluation Classroom teachers will be evaluated frequently by school leadership in an effort to best serve students. Personalized professional development plans will help guide the assessments, with a focus on continual improvement to encourage student achievement. PERSONNEL POLICY Appendix Helix Personnel Policy specifies details for Helixʼs Personnel Policy. This includes requirements for certification, as provided by Louisiana Charter School Law, and is in compliance with No Child Left Behind. The policy also includes procedures for hiring and dismissing school personnel, the schoolʼs policy for evaluating employees, terms of employment, employee schedule and leave requests, salary, grievance procedures, and employee health and welfare benefits or services. Appendix Job Descriptions for Helix High School: STEM provides details of job descriptions and the responsibilities for all staff members. SBESE Policy for Charter Schools Helix High School: STEM will comply with the SBESE Policy for Charter Schools. Section II E. of the Appendix School Personnel Policy reads as follows: “No person who has been convicted of or has pleaded nolo contendere to a crime listed in R.S. 15:587.1(c) shall be hired by a public charter school or public school system for a position of supervisory or disciplinary authority over school children unless approved in writing by a district judge of the parish and the district attorney. No person employed or otherwise associated with the charter school, including any contact person listed on the charter school application or any member of the management board, who has been convicted of or has pleaded nolo contendere to a crime related to misappropriation Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 59 of 195
  • 60. of funds or theft, shall be engaged in direct processing of charter school funds. In order to comply with this section of the personnel policy, all applicants will be required to complete a written application form asking if they have been convicted of or have pleaded nolo contendere to any of the crimes listed in R.S. 15:587.1(c). A list will be provided for reference. Applicants who provide false answers are subject to termination.” Employment Benefits and Retirement Helix employees will participate in a 403(b) tax-sheltered annuity (TSA) plan instead of the district's teacher retirement plan. A 403(b) plan is a tax-advantaged retirement savings plan available for public education organizations. There are significant tax advantages for participants in a 403(b) tax-sheltered annuity: ! Contributions to a 403(b) annuity are tax deferred ! Earnings on the retirement money are facilitator tax deferred ! The annuity can be carried with the participant when he/she changes employers or retires Collective Bargaining Helix will not participate in collective bargaining at the school. Operational Management START UP PLAN A detailed start-up plan is provided in Appendix Start-Up Plan, including timelines and responsible parties for activities that will be required to implement the school plan effectively. EXTERNAL VENDORS Transportation Helix is committed to providing appropriate transportation options to its students. Helix will contract with a third-party vendor, such as First Student, to manage its daily transportation for students. Helix also looks forward to conversations with East Baton Rouge and other school districts to negotiate transportation options. Partnerships with the school district is essential in providing appropriate transportation options for all students. Beyond these services, and inspired by models of successful community-based schools nationwide, Helix will encourage students to carpool as much as possible, helping to extend the culture of the school community beyond the traditional school day. Food Service Helix plans to use a partner program for food services for the school. Downtown Development District is encouraging and willing to assist us in identifying food service businesses downtown that will serve our students, faculty and staff. The partner program will be designed so that students who participate in the Free and Reduced Lunch program will be able to participate in this program at no cost for Free students or no additional cost for Reduced Lunch students. Helix is also open to discussions with East Baton Rouge Parish Schools to consider contracting out food services to best serve students. Health Services Helix High School: STEM will be in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act as required by state and federal law. Helix will seek to work with the East Baton Rouge Parish Schools to partner with the local service providers to meet this need. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 60 of 195
  • 61. Insurance Appendix Helix Insurance Policy Quote describes the level of insurance coverage that is proposed for the school. Safety and Security The Appendix Emergency Response Template provides information on type of personnel, technology and/or equipment and policies that will be utilized to ensure a safe environment for students, facility, and staff. Criteria for Operational Viability Criterion: Operations The school demonstrates effective management of operations: ! Operational Management ! Employment Policies: Employee policies are written and consistent with the charter and applicable law ! Employee Records: Employee records are complete and kept in a manner consistent with the law and employee policies ! Risk Management: Adequate insurance is obtained to provide appropriate levels of risk management ! Health and Safety ! Safety Plan: The school has an up-to-date school safety plan ! Certificate of Occupancy: The school has a current Certificate of Occupancy, if it is located on non-district facilities ! Admissions Policy and Practices ! Policy: The school has a written admissions policy consistent with the law and its charter ! Practices: The admissions policy is implemented with fidelity to charter petition ! Student Discipline ! Policy: The school adheres to written discipline policy that is consistent with the law and the charter ! Records: The school maintains appropriate student discipline records ! Parent Access ! The school adopts policies that address parent access in a manner that is consistent with the law and the charter Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 61 of 195
  • 62. FACILITIES AND FINANCE Facilities Physical Address The identified site of Helix High School: STEM is the Shaw Center for the Arts, located in downtown Baton Rouge at 100 Lafayette Street. Layout The Shaw Center for the Arts will have over 30,000 square feet available for school space, and the remaining space will be provided to existing businesses located within the facility. Excluding the LSU Museum of Art, where the students are planned to participate in coursework, the Shaw Center has nine classrooms available. Information on layout and square footage can be found in Appendix Helix High School: STEM Facilities Floor Plan. Space Utilization Since the Shaw Center for the Arts has current wiring and infrastructure, and is a historical site, no renovations to the building will be necessary. Each floor of the Shaw Center offers two restrooms with three stalls each. The Shaw Center has generously provided the 4th floor terrace to the school two days a week for utilization at the schoolʼs discretion. The school may use the space for recreation (yoga, Thai Chi, etc.), town meetings, common spaces, or in other ways as determined by the Executive Director and Principal of the high school. Evidence of Availability Memorandums referencing the use of the space by the lessee are provided in Appendix Facilities Information. Future/ Contingency Plans The Executive Director has obtained a commitment from the Downtown Development District to ensure adequate space for the school as student enrollment grows in following years. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 62 of 195
  • 63. Finance BUDGET FORMS The state required budget forms can be found in the Appendix labeled Budgets. FINANCIAL SYSTEMS The school plans to use both onsite personnel and third party vendors to perform the financial and accounting functions of the school. One business manager, based onsite, will handle a number of financial functions, including new hire paperwork, time sheet collection and approval, purchasing, invoice approval, and certain aspects of data management. The school plans to use a third party payroll processor to manage payroll tax calculations and filings, benefit deductions, garnishments, and paycheck/direct deposit generation. The school will utilize a third party bookkeeper to process invoices, generate vendor checks and coordinate with the third party payroll processor. The school will utilize a third party controller to manage the business manager and bookkeeper and perform month-end and year-end accounting procedures. The controller will also be responsible for developing reports to school budget managers and the board of directors. The board of directors will exercise its oversight responsibilities by reviewing the periodic financial reports, requesting additional information as needed to understand the schoolʼs financial position fully and question any procedures or items on the financial statements. The board of directors will approve the annual budget and any large, non-standard purchases, as well as review the schoolʼs annual financial audit. The school plans to use an off the shelf accounting system and a chart of accounts consistent with the Louisiana Accounting and Uniform Governmental Handbook. The school intends to use an Excel based budgeting and budget management tool that has already been developed and customized to the school. The tool will be used for day-to-day budget management and approval, scenario analysis, financial reporting, and grant management. Several individuals will be involved in the budget management process to ensure that the school is financially sound. CPA Services Helix will retain a Certified Public Accountant on an annual basis to conduct an audit of the school finances in compliance with state law. Accurate Accounting 4th Sector Solutions (4SS), a charter school focused business management organization, will meet Helixʼs accounting and finance needs. The team at 4th Sector Solutions has experience in the business operations of over 100 charter schools in budget, finance, accounting, and fiscal compliance reporting. The 4SS team will enable Helix to ensure the schoolʼs fiscal well- being. The school will perform a series of reconciliations (including bank account reconciliation) throughout the year to ensure that employees are being paid their contractual amounts, that amounts paid to its third party processor are consistent with expenditures recorded in its financial accounting system, that all payments to vendors are fully recorded in the schoolʼs accounting system and that all cash receipts are both recorded and consistent with amounts owed to it by state, federal, and local sources. The school will keep track of expenditures that meet its capitalization thresholds, and will perform periodic inventories to ensure that the school has proper control over these valuable assets. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 63 of 195
  • 64. The controller will also compile regular financial reports for the school personnel involved in day-to-day financial management and the board of directors involved in overseeing the schoolʼs financial well-being. These reports will provide enough information to answer typical questions and allow for school financial management. The board of directors will have the authority to challenge any financial information, in order to ensure proper accounting of transactions and completion of statements. Sufficient for Audits The financial personnel working with Helix will have extensive experience in independent auditing firms that experienced in auditing the financial statements and controls of a school. These financial personnel are accustomed to aggregating all necessary pre-audit information, including detailed financial statements, backup for all revenues, reconciliations of accounts receivable, details behind all accruals, reconciled bank statements, grant spending detail, inventory information, and other information. The financial personnel have also been through a number of OMB-133 audits related to federal programs at schools. GAAP and Annual Financial Report Format Helix will use a chart of accounts that is consistent with the Louisiana Accounting and Uniform Governmental Handbook. By using similar account codes, Helix will be able to comply with generally accepted accounting standards and to export its financial data from its accounting system and report it accurately and in the proper format in the Annual Financial Report. In additional, the proposed schoolʼs financial staff has significant experience in complying with generally accepted accounting principles and providing financial information to the appropriate governing bodies in the proper format. SOUNDNESS OF FINANCIAL PLANS Helix takes budgeting and budget management very seriously. Through a partnership with 4th Sector Solutions, a charter school focused business management organization, Helix has developed a a detailed budget with well-thought-out staffing. The process included running numerous scenarios with Achievement and financial leaders, allowing a collaborative effort to ensure an appropriate balance between the achievement program and the ensuring of financial stability. The budget for the proposed school was built with an eye towards conservatism. The revenues are based on information provided with enrollment figures significantly below the capacity of the buildings. Helix has assumed attrition to account for the program being new to students in the area. Helix has also only assumed grants that it is reasonably comfortable of receiving. Helix has not assumed any additional philanthropy, although expectations are high that the school will receive extra money to supplement the program. Salaries are based on district averages with staffing tied to reasonable enrollment estimations. In addition, Helix has included a contingency of 5% of revenues to enable it to deal with any unexpected costs or revenue shortages during the year without adversely affecting the achievement program. The school medium-term budget generates a surplus for the school even with the contingency funds. Over the long term, Helix plans to save unused contingencies to help the school navigate any unexpected financial problems and deal with capital needs in the future. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 64 of 195
  • 65. Criteria for Financial Viability Criterion: Financial Reporting The school submits all financial reporting in a timely and accurate manner: ! Preliminary annual budget, due on or before July 1 ! First interim financial report for July through October, due December 15 ! Second interim financial report for July through January 21, due March 15 ! Unaudited actual financial report for July through June 30, due September 15 ! Audited report for prior fiscal year, due December 15 Criterion: Financial Stability The school demonstrates financial stability and sustainability: ! Positive Cash Flow: Cash received exceeds cash expended ! Net Operating Surplus: Operating revenues are greater than operating expenses in the current fiscal year ! Positive Ending Fund Balance: Assets are greater than liabilities ! Adequate Reserve for Economic Uncertainty: Ending fund balance is at least 3% of the current yearʼs expense budget or $50,000, whichever is greater ! Audit Results: Any audit findings are appropriately addressed in a timely manner ! Solvency: Available cash is sufficient to satisfy current liabilities ! Enrollment and ADA: Student enrollment is stable and the Average Daily Attendance factor is maximized to increase apportionment funding Criterion: Financial Management The school demonstrates effective financial management: ! Restricted Funding: Revenues from restricted resources are accounted for separately, and appropriate expenses are being charged according to funding restrictions from the granting agency. ! Accounting Software: Accounting systems adequately report financial information by function and source to charter school management, Board of Directors, and reporting agencies in required forms. ! Safeguarding of Assets: Internal control procedures are implemented to protect assets of the charter school and comply with accounting procedures adequate to prevent misuse of charter school funds. ! Attendance Accounting: Student attendance is accurately tracked and reported in conformity with state laws and reporting requirements. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 65 of 195
  • 66. ! Required Funding Documentation: Supplemental funding applications, plans, claims, and required documentation are filed with the appropriate funding agency by the specified deadline. ! Liabilities: Loans, debts, and outstanding obligations are properly accounted for and paid in a timely manner, as required by legal agreements. ! Enrollment and ADA: Projections are based on the average or adjusted actual enrollment and ADA. Any growth projections are based on historical experience or planned operational changes. ! Budget Development: The staff, management and Board of Directors are involved in the budget development. ! Board Oversight: The management and Board of Directors regularly review the budget in comparison to actual revenue and expenditures and, as new information becomes available, make necessary adjustments to the budget. ! Adjusted Budgets: Current fiscal yearʼs operating budget is updated for new revenue received and new expenses incurred. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 66 of 195
  • 67. APPENDICES Appendix 1 Facilities Floor-plan Appendix 2 Roster of Key Contacts Appendix 3 Board of Directors Résumés Appendix 4 Helix By-laws Appendix 5 Public Records Policy Appendix 6 Compliance with Code of Ethics Appendix 7 Enrollment Projection Chart Appendix 8 Student Enrollment Policy Appendix 9 Staffing Chart Appendix 10 Personnel Policy Appendix 11 Student Discipline Policy Appendix 12 Job Descriptions Appendix 13 Facilities Information Appendix 14 Insurance Policy Quote Appendix 15 Emergency Response Plan Appendix 16 Homeless Student Policy Appendix 17 Strategic Achievement Plan Appendix 18 Start-up Plan Appendix 19 Parent Complaint Policy Appendix 20 Budget Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 67 of 195
  • 68. CHARTER SCHOOL ROSTER of KEY CONTACTS Complete the following Roster for the Board of Directors and key administrative leaders and/or partners for the proposed school. Be sure to include titles and roles. Name of School(s): Helix High School: STEM Name of Nonprofit Corporation: Helix Network of Educational Choices Primary Contact Person: Dr. Brian J. Dixon Mailing Address: 100 Lafayette Street, Baton Rouge, LA 70801 Phone: (day & eve.) (225) 505-5013 Fax: (225) 389-7245 Email: bdixon@helixschools.org NONPROFIT BOARD OF DIRECTORS Position: Member of the board Name: Bryan Jones Mailing 607 Hebert Street Address: Baton Rouge, LA 70806 Phone: (day & eve.) (225) 368-2803 & (225) 218-3648 Fax: (225) 368-2801 Email: brjones@hntb.com Position: Member of board Name: Jane Stadem Metcalf Mailing 510 Castle Kirk Drive Address: Baton Rouge, LA 70808 Phone: (day & eve.) (225) 388-2251 & (225) 769-1861 Fax: None Email: jem_br@bellsouth.net Position: Member of board Name: Dr. James A. Gilmore, Jr. Mailing 1925 North 3rd Street Address: Baton Rouge, LA 70801 Phone: (day & eve.) (225) 342-6289 & (225) 236-7692 Fax: None Email: gilmoreja@netzero.net Position: Member of board Name: Pastor Raymond A. Jetson Mailing 838 Woodstone Drive Address: Baton Rouge, LA 70808 Phone: (day & eve.) (225) 925-3133 & (225) 766-0157 Fax: Email: rayjetson@bellsouth.net Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 68 of 195
  • 69. Business Joseph Keeney Manager: Phone (225) 387-5297 & (203) 940-2708 (day/eve): Fax: None Email: jkeeney@4thsectorsolutions.com Certified Michael A. Tham, CPA Public Accountant: Phone (225) 925-1120 (day/eve): Fax: (225) 927-8124 Email: miketham@laccpa.com Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 69 of 195
  • 70. Appendix: Helix Board Member Résumés Arthur Cooper, Member Chadler Cornett, Member James Gilmore, Jr., Member Raymond Jetson, Pastor, Treasurer Bryan Jones, Founder and President Jane Metcalf, Secretary Dr. Brian J. Dixon, Executive Director
  • 71. CHADLER BRENT CORNETT 6021 Glenwood Drive ! Baton Rouge, LA 70806 Telephone: 225-936-5996 ! ChadlerCornett@gmail.com Directed the administrative, management, and business development initiatives of a Nine Parish (county) Regional Economic Development Partnership; delivering a nationally –recognized regional program of best-practices marketing and service delivery within 24 months. Currently lead a staff of three with a $1.1 million budget for the lead business development entity in East Baton Rouge Parish. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: BATON ROUGE AREA CHAMBER, BATON ROUGE, LA. (A public/private Nine Parish Economic Development Authority & Chamber of Commerce) DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT 1/2009– Present Advanced the organization’s mission by managing a professional service contract with the City of Baton Rouge and Parish of East Baton Rouge to create or retain 800 direct jobs through the recruitment, retention and expansion of economic driver industries with in the parish. Also serve as the Executive Director of the Baton Rouge Area Digital Industries Consortium (BRADIC), a public/private partnership designed to recruit digital media companies to the Baton Rouge Area. • Received unanimous support of the Metro-Council, securing the third consecutive $500,000 contract to serve as the designated business development office for the city/parish government in 2009. • Facilitated a national marketing effort for BRADIC, which led to the successful location of Electronic Art’s North American Quality Assurance center. • Continually recognized by the Louisiana Department of Economic Development as the state’s flagship Economic Development Organization (EDO), and is frequently tapped to function as the ‘designated project lead’ for significant state projects in the Capitol Region. • All original business development staff hires (departmental directors) remain in their roles, each now mentoring new staff acquired through the LSU internship program. DIRECTOR OF REGIONAL RECRUITMENT & DEVELOPMENT 4/2006– 12/2008 Developed new primary sector business opportunities through direct company recruitment, consultative relations and national marketing. Led internal team of project managers and research staff to create a vertically integrated project management system inclusive of GIS, workforce analysis, web based project tracking, and third party qualification. Developed and maintained an economic development national recruitment initiative targeted at creating 1200 direct jobs each year with wages above the regional average. • Directed the recruitment and business development initiatives covering the Baton Rouge MSA including Ascension, Livingston, Iberville, East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, West Feliciana, Saint Helena, and Point Coupee parishes. • Marketed a regional economy to basic sector industries: R&D, Distribution & Logistics, Corporate Headquarters, Engineering Services, Business Services, Advanced Manufacturing, and Biomedical. • Served as the region’s single point of contact for over 200 national site selection consultants. • Managed five direct reports : project managers, research associates, and administrative coordinators • Completed 31 economic development projects since 2007, exceeding the job recruitment, retention and expansion goal of 2,500 jobs by 1,993 (+91%) at 4,493 and exceeded the wage goal of $38,357 per job with an average wage estimated at $45,823 (+19%). Total annual payroll exceeded the $99 million goal by $93 million (+94%) at $192 million. THE AREA DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP, HATTIESBURG, MS. (A Tri County Economic Development & Chamber of Commerce Authority) ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 7/2005 – 4/2006 Advanced the organization’s mission by developing new business opportunities through implementing newly developed programs targeted at business retention and expansion. Led external affairs initiatives for federal earmarks, public policy directives, and site selection consultant relations. • Led overall recruitment and retention initiatives and programs; leading to over 200 net new jobs from recruitment with an annual starting salary 42% above area’s annual average salary, and 170 new jobs due to expansion of existing industry.
  • 72. • Developed economic development recruiting platform by identifying cluster possibilities; highlighting industries including polymer manufacturers and plastics R&D, Distribution & Logistics, Back Office, Call Centers, and Retail. • Implemented new strategies for project identification and community compatibility, resulting in a new methodology called ROED “Return On Economic Development.” • Created rural community economic development strategies, applying and conducting strategic planning, economic base analysis, retail leakage and analysis, trend analysis, and trade area analysis. CENTER FOR COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, UNIV. OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI, HATTIESBURG (A university center program of the Economic Development Administration, U.S. Dept. of Commerce) RESEARCH ASSOCIATE 7/2004 – 7/2005 Spearheaded development projects for a demographic base of 105,000, notable for managing the largest project ever directed by a Research Associate at this center. Delivered under-deadline and under-budget. Responsible to upper- management for four other macro and micro studies requiring data interpretation and a development plan designed to cultivate regional growth. • Developed and managed deadlines and budget parameters; typical project results: 20% under-deadline, 26% under-budget. • Managed the efforts of four direct reports for one of the most extensive projects of the year, a Housing Study for the City of Hattiesburg, MS. • Managed high visibility in the community, speaking at dozens of public events, city council, and concerned citizen group meetings on projects findings and recommendations. • Responsible for an economic leakage study in a trade area of 6,000 people; designing a plan to help the community build wealth and sustain it. PROFESSIONAL LICENSURES,CERTIFICATIONS: Certified Economic Developer (coursework complete, awaiting examination) -International Economic Development Council, Strategic Planning Georgia Tech University, October 2006 -International Economic Development Council, Business Credit Analysis Baltimore, MD February 2006 -International Economic Development Council, Business Retention & Expansion Saint Petersburg, FL January 2006 -International Economic Development Council, Real Estate & Reuse Georgia Tech University, November 2005 Economic Development Finance Professional, designation granted January 2008 Real Estate Agent. Mississippi License S-29909 Insurance Agent. Accident, Life, & Health, MS License 0309758 Notary Public, October 2003 Mississippi REALTOR! Institute, Broker July 2004 Mississippi REALTOR! Institute, Salesperson June 2002 EDUCATION: LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, BATON ROUGE, LA PRESENT Masters of Business Administration Degree to be conferred 2010 THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI, HATTIESBURG, MS. 8/2005 Masters of Science in Economic Development Capstone Project: Community Tax Impact Model Cumulative GPA: 3.9/4.0 THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI, HATTIESBURG, MS. 8/2004 Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Banking & Finance Cumulative GPA: 3.10/4.00, Major GPA: 3.36/4.00
  • 73. CONSULTING & BUSINESS INVOLVEMENT: THE ARBOR COMPANY, LLC. Partner, Real Estate, & Economic Development Consulting Firm TIE-DOWN SOLUTIONS, INC. Chairman, Family owned company providing patented hurricane tie down systems PUBLICATIONS: COMPTON, KIM. CORNETT, CHADLER, ET AL. “STATE OF THE COAST ECONOMY” PRINCIPAL: HARRISON COUNTY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION. THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT RESOURCE CENTER, THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI, HATTIESBURG, MS. MARCH 15, 2005. CORNETT, CHADLER & GOODMAN, MARK. “HATTIESBURG HOUSING STUDY” PRINCIPAL: CITY OF HATTIESBURG. THE CENTER FOR COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI, HATTIESBURG, MS. DECEMBER 4, 2004. AWARDS: MUNROE-PETROLEUM AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS: • University of Southern Mississippi Alumni Association • USM Economic Development Alumni Society, President • International Economic Development Council • Baton Rouge Area Association of Realtors, CID • Louisiana Industrial Development Executives Association • Southern Economic Development Council • National Association of REALTORS! • Pi Kappa Phi Alumni Society REFERENCES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
  • 74. 1ARTHUR R. COOPER 38197 Summerwood Ave Prairieville, Louisiana 70769 Home :(225) 744-3937 Office: (225) 615-8904 Cell: (225) 241-0303 SUMMARY ! Executive with broad experience in management in public and private sectors. ! Experience in Economic Development ! Experience in biotechnology and nutraceutical technologies. ! Extensive knowledge of computers and internet. ! Strong legal skills. ! Experience as an engineer, attorney and CEO. EMPLOYMENT CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER 2005-PRESENT Louisiana State University System Research & Technology Foundation Baton Rouge, LA Provide day to day Management of the research foundation and oversight of $ 30 million venture capital fund. Provide assistance to the Louisiana university technology transfer offices in evaluating and marketing their technology. Manage eight regional economic development directors for the Louisiana Department of Economic Development. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LOUISIANA EMERGING TECHNOLOGY CENTER 2004-PRESENT Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA Mange the wet-lab incubator located on the LSU Campus. Work with the LSU research campuses in assisting in the startup of companies around university technology. Provide assistance to the LSU technology transfer offices in evaluating and marketing their technology. Work with the LSU Systems governmental relations committee regarding Economic Development issues. DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS RETENTION & ASSISTANCE 2001-2004 Department of Economic Development Baton Rouge, LA Reorganized members of various groups within the Department into the Business Retention & Assistance, and as a result, greatly improving the efficiency of the section. Assisted Cluster Professionals with structuring and analysis of projects for existing companies to help retain or expand the existing companies or attract their suppliers. Worked with legislators to provide incentives to help retain, modernize companies and provide seed capital to technology companies. Acted as a liaison with the small business development community to strength the assistance to small business, including the Small Business Development Centers and establishing the TANF microenterprise program. Directly assisted small businesses with their business plans and obtaining investment capital. Assisted the Department in achieving its informational systems goals, by acting as project manager for its Customer Relationship Management team, LACES database, Site Selection project and Economic Evaluation project. Acted as Departments liaison with local economic developers. Retained and supervised the regional representatives of the Department.
  • 75. AREA ATTORNEY 2001 Small Business Administration Baton Rouge, LA Provide legal advise to the Administration regarding Louisiana law. Prepare and assist in execution of loan documents. Assist disaster victims in applying for assistance. CEO 1999-2001 SuperNatural Foods, LLC (and its predecessor Food Science) Baton Rouge, LA Organized and managed startup technology company. Negotiated and drafted company operating, licensing and production agreements. Supervised employees in four states and sales across the country. Responsible for the accounting records and tax reporting. Supervised the research and development of the company. Developed extensive contacts in the biotech, food and venture communities. Created the business goals and mission. Successful placed a new product in major retail chains across the country. MANAGING PARTNER 1998-2001 Arthur R. Cooper, APLC Baton Rouge, LA Assisted Startup Business in obtaining capital in the private equity market. Managed the law offices business affairs. Supervised all employees and handled the accounting, billing and taxes. Handled intellectual property matters, including licensing, litigation and technology transfer. Provided assistance in the formation of startup companies. MANAGING PARTNER 1983-1998 Bell, Cooper & Hyman (and predecessor firms) Baton Rouge, LA Extensive trial experience in state and federal court. Admitted to practice before all state and federal courts in Louisiana. Managed the law partnership business affairs. Supervised all employees and handled the accounting, billing and taxes. Handled intellectual property matters, including licensing, litigation and technology transfer. Provided assistance in the formation of over 50 startup companies. Lead attorney in over 20 jury trials. MANAGING PARTNER 1983-1998 Bell, Cooper & Hyman Investment Company (and predecessor firms) Baton Rouge, LA Managed the real estate investments of Company. Conducted lease negotiations and property management of office complex. Responsible for the acquisition and sale of property. DESIGN ENGINEER 1980-1982 Barbay Engineers Baton Rouge, LA Designed REA transmission and distribution power lines. Prepared accident investigation for major utilities companies.
  • 76. EDUCATION ACCOUNTING COURSES 2001- Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA JURIS DOCTOR 1980 - 1983 Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA B.S. IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 1976-1980 Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA ASSOCIATIONS AND BOARDS Member of the Louisiana State Bar Association Board member of the Louisiana Industrial Development Executives Association Member of the International Economic Development Council Member of the National Business Incubator Association Board member of NO Bioinnovation Center Board member of the Louisiana Small Business Development Centers REFERENCES WILL BE PROVIDE UPON REQUEST
  • 77. JAMES A. GILMORE, JR. 1925 North 3rd Street 225-236-7692 Baton Rouge, LA 70801 gilmoreja@netzero.net EDUCATION: SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY A&M COLLEGE, Baton Rouge, LA December, 1999 GPA: 3.3 Degree: Bachelor of Arts Major: Political Science LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, Baton Rouge, LA May, 2001 GPA: 3.75 Degree: Master’s Major: Public Administration LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, Baton Rouge, LA June 2003 – Present GPA: 3.78 Degree: Ph.D., Human Resource Development Major: Leadership Development CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN HUMAN RESOURCES (PHR) Society of Human Resource Managers CERTIFICATE Executives in State and Local Government (Fannie Mae Fellow) 2006 Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government WORK EXPERIENCE DIRECTOR, Volunteer Louisiana Office of the Lieutenant Governor ! Promoting an ethic of service throughout the state by creating and implementing strategic volunteer initiatives and supporting efforts among nonprofits, faith-based organizations and public entities. ! Oversight of www.volunteerlouisiana.gov, a statewide resource for those seeking volunteers and individuals seeking volunteer opportunities ! Assist in coordinating disaster response efforts for spontaneous volunteers ! Oversight of Voluntourism, a statewide effort to encourage Louisiana tourists to volunteer during their visit ! Oversight of the Louisiana Volunteer Service Awards, an effort established by the Lieutenant Governor to recognize citizens and organizations for outstanding volunteer service. VICE PRESIDENT, Louisiana Housing Finance Agency (August 2006 – August 2007) ! Coordination of joint ventures and special programs related to Housing with federal, state, and local governmental agencies ! Coordinator of Agency’s legislative and congressional agenda ! Development and management of Agency’s budget and staffing plans ! Design of programs to satisfy the housing and support service needs of Louisiana’s low- and moderate income residents with use of Community Development Block Grant Dollars. ! Responsible for designing and implementing all educational training and workforce development programs
  • 78. ! Streamlined the Louisiana’s Energy Assistance and Weatherization Program by allocating 20 million dollars to Community Action Agencies in an effort to expedite federal energy assistance funding to needy families. ! Administered over 200 Million in Disaster Relief Low-Income Housing Tax Credits ! Administered over 8 Million in Federal HOME dollars ! Administered over 179 Million in Mortgage Revenue Bonds in 2006. ! Helped administer 15 Million in Social Service Block grant to provide holistic services to homeless ! Helped secure the Agency’s first State General Fund Allocation of 25 Million dollars to the Louisiana Housing Trust Fund. POLICY ADVISOR, OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR (January 2004 – August 2006) ! Researched best practices and policies in social services, housing, and community development. ! Assisted in drafting legislation related to the housing trust fund, the elimination of blighted housing, the creation of housing recovery centers, and the creation of Louisiana’s first land trust. ! Assisted in policy research which led to a minimum wage increase for all Louisiana Civil Service employees. ! Spokesperson for Governor’s Office on issues related to Social Services, Housing and Community Development. ! Assisted in designing and coordinating programs in the areas of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Childcare, Foster care, Refugee Care, Affordable Housing, Predatory Lending, Community Development, and Workforce Development. ! Coordinator of the Governor’s Summit on Solutions to Poverty. Advised on the Governor on Policy Strategies to Reduce Poverty. ! Served as a Policy Liaison to the Louisiana Housing Finance Agency and the Department of Social Services. ! Assisted in the organizational development of the Louisiana Recovery Authority and served as Deputy Director of Long Term Recovery Planning. ! Managed and Allocated over 150 Million in Private Activity Bonds. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER, USG Corporation (June 2001 – December 2003) ! Managed recruitment, interviewing, and hiring of hourly and professional employees. ! Responsible for designing and implementing all educational training and workforce development programs ! Managed Safety and Training Programs. ! Monitored and tracked employee incentive and disciplinary policies, leave policies, affirmative action and EEO Compliance policies. ! Assisted in Payroll and Benefits Administration. ! Designed and managed employee pay for performance policies and programs. ACTIVITIES: President, Louisiana State University Public Administration Student Association President, Southern University Sophomore Class Member, National Forum of Public Administrators Member, Gamma Sigma Delta
  • 79. Alpha Sigma Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Member, American Society of Human Resource Managers Member, American Society of Training and Development SKILLS: Public Speaking; Speech Writing; Grant Research/Writing, Windows Vista Microsoft Excel; PowerPoint; Access; Internet Research; Lexis -Nexis; Eviews (Economic Forecasting); SPSS (Social Science Statistical Management System); Healthcare Management System (HMS); Survey Research and Design; WRITING & RESEARCH: Leadership Ethics in Organizations; Transformational, Transactional, and Charismatic Leadership Behaviors in Organizations; Ethics in Healthcare Organizations; Program Evaluation of the Plantation Mental Health Program; Workplace Diversity; Data Collection on Healthcare Needs of HeadStart Children and Families; Succession Planning in Public and Private Organizations; Employee Motivations; An Analysis of Louisiana’s Cooperative Extension Services; Best Practices in Adult, Career, and Technical Education; Role Analysis of Instructional Supervisors; Strategies to Human Capital Development; Civic Engagement Among African Americans; Political Trust; Ethics in Government; PROJECTS: Madison Parish Redevelopment Planning; Southern University and A & M College Strategic Planning; Southern University Recruitment and Retention Planning; Southern University Office of Research and Strategic Initiatives Planning; Southern University Alumni Center Finance Planning & Implementation; Louisiana Board of Regents Educational/Community Assessment of the Delta Parishes; Governor’s Office of Women’s Policy Strategic Alignment Project;
  • 80. References Dr. Kim-Hunter Reed, Louisiana Board of Regents (225) 342-4253 Dr. Jim Richardson, Dean, Louisiana State University School of Public Administration (225) 578-6743 Dr. James Llorens, Dean, Assistant Chief Administrative Officer, City of Baton Rouge (225) 358-3000 Dr. Michael Stubblefield, Southern University, Vice Chancellor of Research and Strategic Initiatives (225) 205-7107
  • 81. Raymond A. Jetson rayjetson@bellsouth.net 838 Woodstone Drive Baton Rouge, LA 70808 225-766-0157 (h) 225-925-3133 (o) 225-324-6256 (c) CAREER PROFILE Award-winning executive with a breadth of experience and accomplishments in the pubic sector and human services arenas. Strategic vision coupled with overall business acumen to leverage background as state representative, senior-level positions within state agencies, and in pastoral leadership. Astute decision-maker adept at establishing and directing initiatives, developing innovative models, and creating viable courses of action to achieve optimum results. Presented or participated in national panels—Harvard Think Tank on Poverty, Justice and Jobs; Invited panelist, Kravis-deRoulet Leadership Conference, “Leading Social Change;” New York Regional Association of Grant Makers; Congressional Delegation led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi; Congressional Black Caucus Foundation; U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Disaster Recovery; the Brookings Institution; and the Wealth and Giving Forum. Extensive record of providing key ingredients to create informative and newsworthy stories for major media outlets—USA TODAY, The New York Times, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and the Chronicle of Philanthropy. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE PASTOR – Star Hill Church (Baton Rouge) – December 1994 to Present Provides the leadership that has transformed a congregation of 300 people into a dynamic body of more than 1,500 spiritual entrepreneurs. Many of these individuals are embedded in a diversity of community and governmental agencies focused on an identified list of priority areas. ! Orchestrating the completion of a building project which will transition the church from a 17,000 square foot structure to one of 26,000 square feet. This will broaden the capacity to serve as a community gathering place as well as the nucleus for a number of transformative initiatives. ! Recipient of 2009 Mary E. Moody Lifetime Achievement award. CEO – Louisiana Family Recovery Corps (Baton Rouge) – 2006-2008 Led the development and implementation of an innovative model of humanitarian service for assisting individuals impacted by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. ! Provided recovery services to more than 30,000 individuals. ! Facilitated the transition for 5,000+ households from FEMA-sponsored trailer camps to permanent homes. ! Spearheaded the presentation of research on housing policy, out-of-state hurricane survivors, attitudes of returning residents, and gaps in services. ! Conducted presentations to Brookings Institution, New York Area Grant Makers, United States Senate Ad-Hoc Committee on Disaster, Louisiana Legislature, and Press Club. ! Developed partnerships with over 150 national, state, and local organizations. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 79 of 195
  • 82. Raymond A. Jetson -- Page Two PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE (cont.) DEPUTY SECRETARY – LA Department of Health and Hospitals (Baton Rouge) 2004-2006 Chief Operating Officer of the largest state agency with 12,000 employees and $7 billion budget. Accountable for major program offices, Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Addictive Disorders. ! Created the Office of Aging charged with coordinating statewide home and community- based waiver services, as well as Long-Term Personal Care Services for eligible elderly and disabled adults who require specialized supports and services to remain in their homes and communities. ! Led the development of integrated service delivery for individuals with co-occurring disorders. ! Chaired Governorʼs Task Force on Long-Term Care Reform. ASSISTANT SECRETARY, Office for Citizens with Developmental Disabilities LA Department of Health and Hospitals (Baton Rouge) – 2000-2004 Developed innovative programming to provide comprehensive individualized supports and services for people with developmental disabilities to allow them to live in their own homes or with their families in their own community. ! Increased access to home and community-based services for over 10,000 individuals with disabilities. ! Reduced number of individuals in state-run institutions by 30%. ! Increased participation of persons with disabilities serving in an advisory role to provide input to office decision-making. STATE REPRESENTATIVE, District 61 – Louisiana House of Representatives 1984-1999 Over 15 years of progressive responsibility and achievement providing service to the citizens of the State of Louisiana. ! Member, Appropriations Committee ! Chairman, Transportation and Public Works Committee ! Vice Chairman, Health and Welfare Committee ! Chairman, Legislative Black Caucus ! Author, Performance-Based Budget Legislation ! Co-Author, Education Trust Fund Legislation ! Author, Legislation creating access to services for more than 1,000 individuals with developmental disabilities Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 80 of 195
  • 83. Raymond A. Jetson -- Page Three ORGANIZATIONS & AFFILIATIONS Board Member, Gulf Coast Housing Partnership Post-Katrina regional organization with a national board of directors focused on re-creating housing along the Gulf Coast $22 million in assets Advisory Board Member, Full-time Fatherʼs Partnership School of Social Work, Southern University Other Involvement Alzheimerʼs Services Habitat for Humanity Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Juvenile Justice Implementation Commission Life Member, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity EDUCATION & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Master of Arts Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry Other Universities Attended Southern University – Baton Rouge, Louisiana Grambling University – Grambling, Louisiana Professional Development Center for Creative Leadership – Greensboro, North Carolina Leadership Development Program (LDP) Crisis Leadership Leadership Louisiana Leadership Baton Rouge Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 81 of 195
  • 84. BRYAN J. JONES 607 Hebert Street, Baton Rouge LA 70806 bjones19@gmail.com 225.202.0141 EDUCATION: Louisiana State University, Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mass Communication with a concentration in Political Communication; obtained May 2005 Avoyelles High School (Moreauville, Louisiana), College Prep High School Diploma, graduated with honors; obtained May 2001 EXPERIENCE: Sr. Public Involvement Representative HNTB Corporation, Baton Rouge LA December 2007-Present Public affairs consultant to numerous government clients for infrastructure environmental clearance, design, construction and/or maintenance Responsible for the development and implementation of all public involvement programs on major HNTB project initiatives in Louisiana and Mississippi Charged with managing governmental affairs activities in Louisiana and Mississippi and responsible for project pursuits as a member of the office sales team Support HNTB’s national governmental relations director, crafting federal and state governmental relations plans Project experience includes: o Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development’s Submerged Roads Program ($160 million), New Orleans, LA o Baton Rouge Loop ($4 billion), Baton Rouge, LA o Lafayette Regional Expressway ($2 billion), Lafayette, LA o Biloxi Infrastructure Repair Program ($360 million), Biloxi, MS o Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development’s LA 1 Toll Publicity Plan ($575,000), Golden Meadow, LA Public Affairs Coordinator Parsons Brinckerhoff (PB), Baton Rouge LA November 2005-December 2007 Public affairs consultant to the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development on a Joint Venture contract, Louisiana TIMED Managers (LTM) One of five professionals, including the Communications Director, that made up the Public Outreach Division for the Transportation Infrastructure Model for Economic Development (TIMED) Program
  • 85. Bryan J. Jones Responsible for assisting in the development and implementation of a statewide campaign for the TIMED Program Managed governmental affairs activities for the TIMED Program, notably relationships with the Governor’s office, the State Bond Commission, legislators including the legislative transportation committees and local officials statewide o The TIMED Program is a $4.9 billion taxpayer-approved legislative act that created a program funded by a four cent per gallon gas tax to increase economic development throughout the state of Louisiana by investing in various transportation upgrades, highway widening projects, and new infrastructure corridors Duties for PB Communications included: o Evaluation of public outreach, communication and public affairs program all PB Program Management projects nationwide; assigned to manage evaluation and communication support on Katy Freeway Reconstruction Project in Houston, TX and the California High-Speed Rail Program; assisted evaluation on Miami-Dade County’s People Transportation Plan in Miami, FL State Emergency Communications Media Assistant State of Louisiana, Baton Rouge LA September-November 2005 As one component of the state government’s response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, an emergency media relations team was created to serve as a liaison to local, national, and international media The media relations team worked on-site at the Louisiana State Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness and later was stationed at the FEMA Joint Field Office Responsibilities included: o Assisting in the scheduling of daily press briefings o Working with cabinet-level and statewide-elected officials and their communications staffs to coordinate participation in briefing schedule o Distributing daily speaking points and updated figures report to media and government staffs; includes Task Force Pelican and By the Numbers o Arranging interviews with state officials and others closely related to the relief effort o Assisting in the coordination of media tours to the devastated regions of both hurricanes through Louisiana State Police, Louisiana National Guard and Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries o Serving as moderator for press briefings o Attending all press briefings (including those not associated with state government) and providing a detailed report upon request of senior staff o Monitoring print, television, and Internet news for all coverage related to Louisiana and the hurricane relief effort o Working with communications staffs to develop a detailed itinerary for the Louisiana Recovery Authority’s initial air and ground tour of both Southeast and Southwest Louisiana 2
  • 86. Bryan J. Jones Executive Assistant Bryan D. Fisher, Tomeny & Fisher, Baton Rouge LA November 2001-May 2005 Began working during first semester at LSU as a courier and later was promoted to executive assistant to one of the law firm’s two partners Responsibilities included: o Executing all courthouse and office filings o Drafting particular client, business-financial, and attorney’s personal correspondence o Implementing specific client relations campaigns; most successful being the Christmas and birthday card mail-outs o Maintaining personal schedule for attorney o Various other office and clerical duties Intern Office of U.S. Senator John Breaux, Baton Rouge LA & Washington DC May 2002-June 2003 Interned in the Baton Rouge office through May 2003 and for the month of June 2003 in the Projects Division of the Washington DC office Responsibilities included: o Interacting with constituents in office visits, phone conversations, and mail correspondence; constituents in Washington tended to be state leaders, business and industry leaders from Louisiana, and others lobbying the Senator o Attending various private meetings and committee hearings both representing the Senator and taking notes for staff members on pertinent issues o Representing the Senator at various private business gatherings, social functions, and other receptions that he was unable to attend o Responding to constituent mail through a complex online congressional mail system, Capital Correspondence o Assisting in the planning and logistics of Washington fundraising events that the Senator cosponsored for congressional colleagues ACTIVITIES: Founding Board Member & President Advance Innovative Education (AIE) Govern non-profit organization formed in 2009 to address critical needs in Louisiana’s public education system Organization utilizes fee-for-service model to provide educators and administrators necessary professional development to maintain licensure Key organization initiatives include accredited alternative teacher and principal certification programs and the design and planning of two new charter high schools for the Capital Region (one with a curriculum focused on digital media and the arts and the other focused on science, technology, engineering and math) 3
  • 87. Bryan J. Jones Founding Member Progress Is… Community movement dedicated to advancing initiatives that enhance quality of life, spur economic and cultural development and build a stronger Capital Region Founded to promote Baton Rouge’s infrastructure bond initiative that will appear on November 2009 ballot Founding Board Member Capital Area Region Leadership Initiative (CARLI) Leadership program modeled after Leadership Baton Rouge and Leadership Louisiana focused on the nine parishes of the Capital Region First class to begin Fall 2009 Board Member Advance Baton Rouge (ABR) Govern non-profit organization formed in 2005 to address the Baton Rouge area’s educational inequities and low achievement rates Serve on advisory panel responsible for creation of two new alternative high schools with digital media and science/technology curriculum focuses to capitalize on growing industries in Louisiana, notably the Capital Region Participant Leadership Baton Rouge, Class of 2009 Attend monthly lectures, discussions, field trips and exercises pertinent to issues facing the Baton Rouge community Founding Member & Vice-President Public Action for Change in Education (PACE) Community organization in Pointe Coupee Parish developed to raise awareness of the plight of the public education system Recruited, through community awareness campaign, new candidates to run for parish-wide school board Of eight-member board, five new members were elected; turnout was over 40 percent of registered voters (nearly double statewide average) Developed long-term agenda for organization that included obtaining 501(c)(3) status, funding of board member training, “meet your school board member” community roundtables, publishing board member voting records and implementing other accountability measures Board Member Republican State Central Committee Elected in March 2004 to a four-year term; did not seek reelection in 2008 Represented Pointe Coupee, West Baton Rouge, and parts of West Feliciana parishes Served on Outreach and Endorsement sub-committees Youngest of the 200+ member body 4
  • 88. Bryan J. Jones Member Governor-Elect Bobby Jindal Transition Team Served on Education Committee Traveled the state to collect testimony relevant to K-12 education policy Made policy recommendations to the Governor-Elect Campaign Manager Bud Torres for Sheriff (Pointe Coupee) Developed and managed media strategy and outreach for the campaign Served as a top adviser to the candidate and the sheriff-elect during the transition Member Pointe Coupee Community Foundation Served on Advisory Committee Non-profit community foundation created to provide funding to organizations whose purpose is to affect long term benefits for social, educational, and cultural needs of the Pointe Coupee Parish community Assisted Director in the development of foundation’s marketing and communications plan and long-term strategies Member Baton Rouge Mayor-President Kip Holden Transition Team Served on the Transportation Committee Worked with other members to prioritize traffic problems in Baton Rouge and collectively prepared initial transportation briefing on Green Light Program for Mayor Holden Only university student to serve on the transition team Campaign Manager Gieg-Downs 2005 LSU Student Government campaign Developed a comprehensive media strategy for the campaign complete with a kickoff press conference and materials such as push cards, banners, a campaign website, buttons, stickers, and yard signs Made transportation a key component of the campaign; ensured that a GPS tracking system would be added to all campus buses and that a carpool parking lot system would be created; both were implemented Managed a senior campaign staff of 15 people and oversaw a total campaign of over 400 people The campaign won with 65 percent of the vote; 8500 total votes cast VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE: Boys Hope Girls Hope (BHGH) of Baton Rouge Serve on the organization’s Advisory Board Participate in social events with participating youth Organize fundraisers and promote BHGH mission 5
  • 89. Bryan J. Jones Apprentice Mentoring Program for Students (AMPS) Serve as a mentor to two Pointe Coupee Parish high school juniors Participate in educational and social events with students Expose students to various cultural and recreational opportunities AMPS Program is funded by NRG Energy, parent company of Louisiana Generating American Red Cross Hurricane Katrina special needs shelter August 2005 Assisted Louisiana Department of Social Services employees in the creation of a missing evacuee database Coordinated volunteer registration with members of the LSU Student Government Pointe Coupee Parish Historical Society 2004 Assisted in the planning and marketing of the opening of the Julian Poydras Museum in historical downtown New Roads 6
  • 90. JANE STADEM METCALF 510 Castle Kirk Drive 225-769-1861 (Home) Baton Rouge, LA 70808 225-388-2251 (Work) jem_br@bellsouth.net 225-933-4004 (Cell) metcalfj@sjabr.org ____________________________________________________________________________________ EXPERIENCE Currently offering consulting services to schools to assist with techology planning, implementation and/or remediation. July 2004 – July 2008: Director of Technology at St. Joseph’s Academy, Baton Rouge, LA St. Joseph’s Academy, a college preparatory school for girls, provides laptop computers to all faculty and students. It provides state of the art multimedia equipment and educational software. It seeks to stay on the leading edge of technology use in high school education. I was hired to use my business expertise to undergird the technology flash with stable reliable services. Major accomplishments: • Replace a 25 year old PBX with a fully VoIP system using PRI connection and unified messaging. • Negotiated a 300% increase in Internet bandwidth while reducing the price by $1,000.00 a month. • Manage an onsite warranty repair shop staffed by student technicians who provide a three day turn-around on help tickets. • Instituted acquisition and management standards and procedures to move from break-fix to always available technology access for critical applications. Significantly reduced annual technology budget. • Significantly reduced annual technology budget. • Redesigned staffing model and job descriptions to significantly improve customer satisfaction rating while reducing staff by 1.5 FTE. • Recipient of a Cisco Systems Growing with Technology award in the public sector category. • Recipient of the Catholic Schools of Excellence award in the Technology Innovation category. • Recipient of the WindowsPro innovation in Education Award • Recipient of CoSN’s Team Leadership Award Duties: • Participate in strategic planning for all aspects of the organization. • Head of the school board technology committee, member of the faculty curriculum committee, and member of the school board internal programs committee. • Lead teams in both strategic and tactical planning for technology services. • Identify emerging technologies that have potential for enhancing classroom and administrative functions. • Manage technology projects from initiation to completion. • Direct quality assurance process to insure technical tools will perform without incident. • Facilitate research efforts by graduate students from Louisiana State University. • Member of the Louisiana Technical College Advisory Board
  • 91. • Presenter at educational conferences on effective technology services in schools. • Manage vendor relations and contract negotiations. • Advise Schools from across the nation on the management of school technology. • Manage a staff of 4.5 professionals who perform all I.T. functions. January 2008 – Present: Adjunct Instructor, Louisiana State University. Instructor for ELRC 2507: Integrating Technology in the Curriculum. January 2008 – Present: Consultant to school districts wishing to enhance their technology services. Participate in Collaboration with Educollaborators, AALF and my own consulting firm. I am currently working with Jefferson Parish Public School System in the New Olreans area. August 1992 – July 2004: Systems and Operations Manager, Louisiana Workers' Compensation Corporation, Baton Rouge 70808. Planning and Implementation Duties: • Prepare and manage a $2,500,000.00 budget. • Represent corporate interest in acquisition of new services. Duties include gathering end user requirements, estimating ROI, authoring RFP, response evaluation and, in conjunction with General Counsel, negotiation of contracts. A recent renegotiation for long distance and private network services resulted in a 42% saving over the previous contract. • Team with end user departments and technical vendors in major technology initiatives. • Prepare strategic planning documents and manage multiple projects to insure I.S. resources and infrastructure are in place to meet projected needs. • Author I.S. standards, policies and procedures documents. • Liaison with external and internal audit efforts. • Create project plans including scope documents, time lines, resource allocation, milestones, and evaluation criteria. • Plan and directs major infrastructure modifications. Management of a staff of 12 professionals who provide these functions and services: • Provides full Internet security including administration of the firewall, VPN, intrusion detection system, and virus software. • Manage 21 file and database servers, 500 desktops, 100 laptops housed in three offices networked via T1 and VPN. • Manage ancillary systems including medical bill review, FAXserver, CD-ROM server, Intranet, Internet, Freedom Financials, PAM Investment services, Premium Audit Server, and HR management systems. • Operate computer room functions including night batch processing, bulk printing, server and network monitoring, and systems backups. • Help desk providing both hardware and software services. • Provide voice communication including management of a PBX, voice mail and ACD services. • Purchase all technical equipment, software, and services. • Act as liaison with facilities to ensure adequate infrastructure, including data wiring and clean electricity. • Act as liaison with user departments to provide technical assistance in task specific system procurement. • Undertake R & D to leverage technical advances to enhance corporate productivity. 1988 -- 1992: System Manager, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Managed a 35 Node VMS Cluster for the System Network Computer Center (May 89-July 92). Duties included: • Providing long and short range planning for VMS services
  • 92. • Performing all software installations, maintenance upgrades and trouble-shooting software problems. Maintaining a variety of network protocols including TCP/IP, DECnet and security utilities. • Surveying hardware and software needs, developing purchasing plans, writing bid specification, and interfacing with end users, accounting staff and vendors. • Providing Internet gateway services to all platforms. Designed and implemented the Macromolecular Computer Facility for the College of Basic Sciences, LSU (January 88 until May 89). • Designed, wrote bid specifications, purchased, and installed a six node computer facility. This facility provides real time graphics to 30 principal investigators and over 70 users. This included the installation of network in two buildings that provided access to user offices and labs. • Prepared documentation, conducted training sessions, and served as technical resource person to facility and staff users. • Performed all system operations, maintenance and upgrade functions. • Performed all non-technical managerial duties including budgeting, purchasing, and grant maintenance. 1987 - 1988: Programmer/Analyst at KEK Laboratory in Tscuba-Chi, Japan for the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, New York. 1975 – 1979: Outreach Coordinator, Suffolk County, New York Department of Social Services. • Liaison to the County Legislators • Member of the Suffolk County Committee on Hunger • Liaison to Social Security, Office for the Aging and Community Services 1968 – 1974: Teacher, Los Angeles City School District. • Chosen for district wide curriculum redesign committee • Chosen for district wide text book selection committee • Speaker at district wide teacher conference • Creator of innovated, future looking class offerings EDUCATION Management Services Institute at LSU Professional credits received Project Management Certification LSU BS: Louisiana State University (Computer Science) 3.6 GPA MA: New York University (Education) 4.0 GPA BA: Arizona State University (English) 2.9 GPA References available upon request:
  • 93. Brian J. Dixon, Ed.D. phone: 858-205-2418 email@brianjdixon.com Teaching High Tech High North County, San Marcos, California Experience Director- High Tech High Flex, 2008-present ! Led organization in planning for a hybrid/ online school ! Investigated current technologies to evaluate feasibility ! Taught classes in HTH Graduate School of Education ! Secured grant funding for equipment purchases and faculty development ! Worked with a range of stakeholders, implementing their feedback ! Facilitated a project-based learning environment supportive of students' individual educational goals ! Led school-wide adoption of digital portfolio system University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, Wisconsin Instructional Technology Consultant, 2008 (term) ! Developed “Introduction to Instructional Technology” online course. ! Helped launch an online professional development program to support teachers' utilization of educational technology tools in their classrooms Point Loma Nazarene University, San Diego, California Instructional Technology Consultant/ Adjunct Professor, 2006-2008 ! Trained K-12 classroom teachers to effectively integrate technology into their curriculum ! Assisted School of Education Dean in planning online course delivery Santa Fe Christian High School, Solana Beach, California Instructional Technology Specialist/ Media Arts Teacher, 2003-2007 ! Designed and delivered in-person, video, and web-based technology training to K-12 classroom teachers and school administrators ! Assisted teachers in implementation of learner-centered, technology-based teaching materials including multimedia presentations ! Created and taught a comprehensive media arts curriculum to middle and high school students focusing on innovative uses of cutting edge technologies ! Led school-wide technology planning committee for accreditation ! Produced two student yearbooks utilizing online publishing technology E. L. Wright Middle School, Columbia, South Carolina Technology Teacher/ Language Arts Teacher, 2001-2003 ! Implemented technology pilot program integrating computers into the language arts curriculum for at risk students ! Designed and facilitated school district wide technology classes, training teachers to effectively integrate technology into their curriculum Education University of San Diego and San Diego State University, San Diego, California Doctorate in Educational Technology ! Dissertation Title: Reflective video journals as a tool to increase high school students’ metacognition ! Maintained a grade point average of 3.9 ! Presented a paper on Podcasting at the DSAG annual symposium ! Presented at the Computer Using Educators regional conference Columbia International University, Columbia, South Carolina Masters of Arts in Teaching, August 2001
  • 94. Providence College, Otterburne, Manitoba Canada Bachelors of Arts in Theatre and Music, May 1999 Technology Internet Safety Foundation, Carlsbad, California Experience Founder, 2006-present ! Conducted Internet Safety Workshops at schools, churches, and community groups throughout San Diego county ! Produced The Internet and Your Kids DVD, teaching parents healthy habits to protect their children online ! Wrote Internet Safety articles to educate parents and teachers Various Organizations Freelance Graphic Designer/ Creative Consultant, 2000-present ! Produced promotional videos for several busineses and organizations ! Designed marketing materials for Lifestreams, NCCC, and AMM ! Designed corporate identity logo for USD/SDSU joint doctoral program Technology Registered iPhone application developer. Avid user of both Windows and Proficiencies Macintosh operating systems. Experience training teachers and students on Microsoft Office, Apple iLife, InDesign, Final Cut Pro, Blackboard CMS, Moodle, Joomla, Druple, Wordpress, Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Personal Response Systems, and Interactive Whiteboards. Presentations Dixon, B. (2009). The Future of Education is Flexible. Michigan Association for Computer Users in Learning, Lansing, MI. Dixon, B. (2009). Reflective Video Journals and Adolescent Students. Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Charleston, SC. Dixon, B. (2006). Podcasting: A Viable Outlet for your Research? Doctoral Students in Education Colloquium, San Diego. Dixon, B. (2006). Myspace is not your space, it’s everybody’s space. Computer Using Educators Regional Conference, Riverside. Publications Dixon, B. (2009). A formative experiment investigating the use of reflective video journals to increase high school students' metacognition. Montezuma Press, San Diego State University, San Diego. Dixon, B. (in process). The Technophobic Teacher: A step by step guide to using innovative technology to increase student engagement, collaboration, and learning. Memberships American Society for Training and Development Association for Educational Communications and Technology International Technology Education Association Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education References available upon request.
  • 95. BYLAWS of Helix Network of Educational Choices 1. PRINCIPAL AND REGISTERED OFFICES 1.1 Principal Office. The principal office of HELIX NETWORK OF EDUCATIONAL CHOICES (hereinafter referred to as the "Helix"), shall be located at 607 Hebert Street, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806, or at such place in the City of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, as the Board of Directors shall from time to time designate. 1.2 Registered Office. The registered office of the Corporation shall be located at 607 Hebert Street, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806, or at such other place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, as the Board of Directors may from time to time designate. The Corporation shall have and shall continuously maintain in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, a registered office at such place as may be designated by the Board of Directors. ! COMPOSITION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2.1 The Board of Directors should consist of members with a diverse set of professional skills and practical work experience in the areas of education, public/nonprofit and/or for-profit administration or operations, community development, finance, and law. o The Board of Directors should be representative of the community(ies) in which the charter school(s) is located. o The Board of Directors shall consist of no more than one person from the same immediate family, as defined by the Louisiana Code of Governmental Ethics. o No member of the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education is eligible to be a member of the Board of Directors. 2.5 No elected official, as defined by the Louisiana Code of Governmental Ethics, is eligible to serve as a member of the Board of Directors as long as the Corporation operates any charter school under the Louisiana Charter School Demonstration Programs Law. No individual formerly classified as an elected official is eligible to serve as a member of the Board of Directors for a period of one year following his or her termination from elected services, provided that the Corporation operates any charter school under the Louisiana Charter Schools Demonstration Programs Law. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 88 of 195
  • 96. 3. BOARD OF DIRECTORS 3.1 Powers of Board. The affairs of the Corporation shall be managed by the Board of Directors. 3.2 Number of Directors. The number of directors of the Corporation shall be a minimum of three (3) and a maximum of fifteen (15). The number of directors shall be the number elected from time to time by the Board of Directors; provided, however, such number shall never be fewer than three (3). No decrease in the number of directors shall have the effect of shortening the term of any incumbent director. 3.3 Election and Term of Directors. The first Board of Directors of the Corporation shall consist of those three (3) persons named as initial directors in the Articles of Incorporation. Such persons shall hold office until the expiration of their respective terms provided in the Articles of Incorporation, or until their successors are elected and have qualified. Thereafter, at the initial annual meeting of the Corporation, the Board of Directors shall elect successor directors, such that there are equal numbers of directors elected to serve a term of two (2) years and one (1) year, beginning at the adjournment of that annual meeting and continuing through the expiration of their respective terms, or until their successors have been elected and qualified. At each subsequent annual meeting of the Corporation, the Board of Directors shall elect directors to serve a term of three years beginning at the adjournment of that annual meeting and continuing through the expiration of their respective terms or until their successions have been elected and qualified. 3.4 Director Selection. The Board of Directors shall authorize a nominating committee to recruit, evaluate, and submit a slate of qualified potential directors for approval to the Board at the annual meeting of the Directors. The Board of Directors shall select the nominating committee, which may be comprised of directors and non-directors. The nominating committee shall be comprised of a majority of Directors. In its selection process, the nominating committee will endeavor to fulfill the tax exempt purpose of the Corporation, Louisiana law, and the respective charter, by making sure that the composition of the Board of Directors is consistent with Section 2 above. The nominating committee shall establish selection rules, which include methods of obtaining input from community members in order to fulfill this goal. 3.5 Board Vacancies. Any and all vacancies occurring on the Board of Directors (including any vacancy resulting from an increase in the authorized number of directors or from the failure to elect the full number of authorized directors) shall be filled by the affirmative vote of a majority of the remaining directors, though not constituting a quorum. A director elected to fill a vacancy shall be elected for the unexpired term of his predecessor in office, or until his successor is elected and qualified. 3.6 Resignations of Directors. Except as otherwise required by law, any director of the Corporation may resign at any time by giving written notice to the Board or to the President or to the Secretary of the Corporation. Such resignation shall take effect at the time not more than thirty (30) days after such receipt as specified in such notice, or on receipt of the notice if no time is specified. Unless otherwise specified in the notice of resignation, no acceptance of such resignation shall be necessary to make it effective. 3.7 Quorum of Directors and Manner of Acting. Unless a greater proportion is required by law or these Bylaws, a majority of the Board of Directors shall be necessary to constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, and the acts of a majority of the directors present at a meeting at which a quorum is present shall be the acts of the Board of Directors. If a quorum is present when a meeting of the Board of Directors is convened, the directors present may Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 89 of 195
  • 97. continue to do business, taking action by a vote of a majority of a quorum as fixed above, until adjournment, notwithstanding the withdrawal of enough directors who leave less than a quorum as fixed above, or the refusal of any director present to vote. Except as otherwise provided by law or by the Articles of Incorporation or these Bylaws, the acts of a majority of the directors present at a meeting at which a quorum is present shall be the acts of the Board. 3.8 Annual and Monthly Meetings of Directors. The annual meeting of the Board of Directors shall be held, in each year immediately after and at the same place as the annual meeting of the Corporation. Such annual meeting may be held on another date or at another place, pursuant to a resolution of the Board, provided that at least five (5) days notice of the new date or place for the annual meeting is given to each director. Monthly meetings of the Board of Directors shall be scheduled at the annual meeting of the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors shall hold no fewer than ten monthly meetings during a calendar year. In accordance with Louisiana Constitution and Open Meetings Law, R.S. 42:4.1 et seq., notice of any meeting shall be posted in the central office of the managed school or schools at least one day prior to the meeting. All such notices shall include an agenda and an explanation of the public comment process and will be announced prior to the start of each meeting. Written public notice of the regular monthly meetings of the Board of Directors shall be given at the beginning of each calendar year. Such notice shall include the dates, times, and places of such meetings. 3.9 Special Meetings of Directors. Special meetings of the directors may be called at any time by the President, the Board of Directors, or the Executive Committee, if one be constituted, by written notice signed by the President or by a majority of the directors or of the Board of Directors of the Executive Committee. Special meetings may be held at such place or places within or outside the State of Louisiana as may be designated by the Board of Directors. In the absence of such designation, any such meeting shall be held at such place as may be designated in the notice thereof. 3.10 Notice of Directors' Meetings. Whenever notice is required to be given under any provision of these Bylaws, it shall be in writing and it may be delivered personally or sent by U.S. mail, electronic mail, by telegram, by express delivery service, or by electronic facsimile transmission to each director at his address as shown by the records of the Corporation. If notice is given by U.S. mail, such notice shall be deemed to be delivered three (3) days after being deposited in the United States Mail in a sealed envelope so addressed, with postage thereon prepaid. If notice is given by telegram or other commercial message delivery service, such notice shall be deemed to be given on the date delivered. If notice is given electronically, such notice shall be deemed delivered when transmitted by electronic mail or facsimile equipment to the intended recipient's electronic mail address or electronic facsimile number as shown in the records of the Corporation. 3.11 Directors' Waiver of Notice. Any director may waive notice of any meeting in writing at any time, either before or after the time notice would have been required and the waiver need not specify the purpose of the business to be transacted at the meeting. Directors present at a meeting shall be deemed to have received due, or to have waived, notice thereof, except where a director participates in the meeting for the express purpose of objecting to the transaction of any business at the meeting on the ground that the meeting is not lawfully called or convened. Except as specifically required by the Articles of Incorporation or these Bylaws, neither the business to be transacted at, nor the purpose of, any regular or special Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 90 of 195
  • 98. meeting of the Board of Directors need be specified in the notice, or waiver of notice, of such meeting. 3.12 Compensation and Expenses of Directors. The Corporation shall not pay any compensation to directors for their services rendered to the Corporation. The Corporation may reimburse directors for reasonable expenses actually incurred in the performance of their duties to the Corporation. 3.13 Honorary Boards and Advisory Committees. The Board may elect or appoint any person to act in an advisory capacity to the Corporation or in an honorary capacity with respect to the Corporation, and may create such honorary Boards or advisory committees and appoint to them such persons as the Board deems appropriate in its sole discretion. Persons serving in such advisory and honorary capacities shall not exercise any of the powers granted to the Board of Directors by law or in these Bylaws or in the Articles of Incorporation of the Corporation. 3.14 Fiduciary Relationship of Directors. Directors and officers of the Corporation shall be deemed to stand in a fiduciary relationship to the Corporation and its Board of Directors, and shall discharge the duties of their respective positions in good faith, and with that diligence, care, judgment, and skill which ordinarily prudent men would exercise under similar circumstances in like positions. 3.15 General Requirements and Prohibitions. The Board of Directors shall comply with all laws applicable to public bodies including, but not limited to, the Louisiana Open Meetings Law, the Louisiana Public Records Law, and the Code of Governmental Ethics. 4. COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 4.1 Executive Committee. The Board of Directors may, by resolution adopted by a majority of the directors in office, designate and appoint an Executive Committee to consist of not fewer than two (2) directors. The Executive Committee shall, to the extent provided in the Board resolution, have and may exercise all of the powers of the Board of Directors in the management of the business and affairs of the Corporation during the intervals between the meetings of the Board, and shall fix its own rules of procedure. Such Executive Committee shall keep a record of its proceedings, which shall from time to time be reported to the full Board of Directors. The designation and appointment of any such Executive Committee and the delegation of authority to the Committee shall not relieve the Board of Directors, or any individual member of the Board of Directors, of any responsibility imposed upon it or him by law. Any vacancy occurring on the Executive Committee shall be filled by the Board of Directors, but the President of the Corporation may designate another director to serve on the Executive Committee pending action by the Board of Directors. The Executive Committee shall hold office during the term of the Board of Directors constituting it, unless otherwise ordered by the Board of Directors. 4.2 Committees Other Than Executive Committee. The Board of Directors may, by resolution adopted by a majority of the directors in office, designate and appoint one or more committees, in addition to the Executive Committee, each of which shall include at least two (2) directors. Such committees shall have the duties assigned to them by the Board of Directors in a resolution. Such committee or committees shall have such name or names as may be set in the Articles of Incorporation or these Bylaws, or as may be determined, from time to time, by the Board of Directors. The designation and appointment of any such Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 91 of 195
  • 99. committee and the delegation of authority to the committees shall not relieve the Board of Directors, or any individual member of the Board of Directors, of any responsibility imposed upon it or him by law. Any vacancy occurring in any such committee shall be filled by the Board of Directors, but the President of the Corporation may designate another director to serve on the committee pending action by the Board. In the event the Board of Directors undertakes the management of one or more charter schools, the committees to be created are as follows: ! Finance – reviews finance reports for accuracy and consistency, and manages the audit process ! Compensation – establishes base compensations levels for school staff and aligns expense with budget availability ! Personnel – ensures personnel polices are in compliance with the various federal and state personnel requirements, and arbitrates any personnel situation that can not be resolved between the teacher and the principal/parent/co-worker ! Board Training – establishes annual training programs and training schedules for members of the Board of Directors to attain knowledge with respect to the operation of a nonprofit organization and the management of a charter school in compliance with the requirements set forth by the Department of Education Charter School Office 4.3 Minutes of Meetings of Committees. Any committee designated by the Board of Directors shall keep regular minutes of their proceedings, and shall report the same to the Board of Directors, when required; but no approval by the Board, of any action properly taken by a committee, shall be required. 4.4 Procedure. If the Board of Directors fails to designate the chairman of a committee, the President, if a member of such committee, shall be the chairman. Each committee shall meet at such times as it shall determine and at any time on call of the chairman. A majority of a committee shall constitute a quorum, and the committee may take action either by vote of a majority of the members present at any meeting at which there is a quorum or by written concurrence of a majority of the members. In case of absence or disqualification of a member of a committee at any meeting thereof, the qualified members present, whether or not they constitute a quorum, may unanimously appoint a director to act in place of the absent or disqualified member. The Board of Directors shall have the power to change the members of any committee at any time, to fill vacancies, and to discharge any committees at any time. 5. OFFICERS, AGENTS AND EMPLOYEES 5.1 Officers. The Board of Directors shall elect a President, a Secretary, and a Treasurer, and may elect one or more Vice Presidents and such other officers and agents as may be necessary for the business of the Corporation. Any two of these offices may be combined in one person; provided that no person holding more than one office may sign, in more than one capacity, any certificate or other instrument required by law to be signed by two (2) officers. Unless otherwise provided in the Articles of Incorporation, none of the officers of the Corporation need be directors. 5.2 Election and Term of Office. The first officers of the Corporation shall consist of those persons named as initial officers, and such persons shall hold office until the first annual election of officers. Thereafter, a nominating committee, which may be comprised of directors Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 92 of 195
  • 100. and non-directors, shall present a slate of officers for Board approval. The Board shall elect officers at each annual meeting of the Board. If the election of officers shall not be held at such meeting, such election shall be held as soon thereafter as conveniently may be held. Each person so elected shall hold office for the term for which he is elected, not to exceed two (2) years. 5.3 Resignation of Officers. Any officer or agent may resign at any time by giving written notice to the Board of Directors or to the President or to the Secretary of the Corporation. Any such resignation shall take effect at the time of receipt or at such later time as therein specified, not to exceed thirty (30) days. Unless otherwise specified in the notice of resignation, no acceptance of such resignation shall be necessary to make it effective. 5.4 Removal of Officers. Any officer or agent may be removed by the Board of Directors with or without cause at any time, without prejudice, however, to the contract rights, if any, of the person so removed. Election or appointment of an officer or agent shall not of itself create any contract rights. 5.5 Vacancies in Offices. A vacancy in any office may be filled for the unexpired portion of the term by the Board of Directors at any meeting of the Board. 5.6 Powers and Duties of Officers. Subject to the authority and control of the Board of Directors, all officers as between themselves and the Corporation shall have such authority and shall perform such duties in the management of the property and affairs of the Corporation as may be provided in these Bylaws or by resolution of the Board of Directors, not inconsistent with these Bylaws, and, to the extent not so provided, as generally pertain to their respective offices. a. President. The President shall, when present, preside at all meetings of the Board of Directors. The President shall be the chief executive officer of the Corporation with general management of the Corporation's business and power to make contracts in the ordinary course of business; shall see that all orders and resolutions of the Board of Directors are carried into effect and direct the other officers in the performance of their duties; shall have the power to execute all authorized instruments; and shall generally perform all acts incident to the office of the President or which are incumbent upon the President under the provisions of the Articles of Incorporation and these Bylaws. The President may delegate authority and responsibility, but such delegation of authority shall not relieve the President of any responsibility imposed upon the President by law, the Articles of Incorporation, or these Bylaws, and the President shall remain fully accountable to the Board of Directors. b. Secretary. The Secretary, when such is required, shall give, or cause to be given, notice of all meetings of the Board of Directors, and committees, and all other notices required by law or by these Bylaws, and in case of the Secretary's absence or refusal or neglect so to do, any such notice may be given by the Board of Directors upon whose request the meeting is called as provided in these Bylaws. The Secretary shall record all the proceedings of the meetings of the Board of Directors and of committees in a book to be kept for that purpose. Except as otherwise determined by the Board of Directors, the Secretary shall have charge of the original accounts, Board of Directors, certificate books and transfer books. If a corporate seal is adopted, the Secretary shall have custody of the seal of the Corporation, and shall affix it to all instruments requiring it. The Secretary shall perform such other duties as may be assigned to him by the Board of Directors or by the President. c. Treasurer. The Treasurer shall supervise and oversee all funds, securities, evidences of indebtedness, and other valuable documents of the Corporation. The Treasurer shall receive and give, or cause to be given, receipts and quittances for monies paid in on Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 93 of 195
  • 101. account of the Corporation and shall payout of the funds on hand all just debts of the Corporation of whatever nature when due. The Treasurer shall enter, or cause to be entered, in books of the Corporation to be kept for that purpose, full and accurate accounts of all monies received and paid out on account of the Corporation, and whenever required by the President or the Board of Directors, the Treasurer shall render a statement of accounts. The Treasurer shall keep or cause to be kept such books as will show a true record of the expenses, gains, losses, assets, and liabilities of the Corporation, and shall perform all the other duties incident to the office of Treasurer. If required by the Board of Directors, the Treasurer shall give the Corporation a bond for the faithful discharge of his duties and for restoration to the Corporation, upon termination of his tenure, of all property of the Corporation under the Treasurer's control. d. Vice President. The Board of Directors may select and appoint one or more Vice Presidents. If the Board of Directors appoints more than one Vice President, each Vice President shall have such powers and shall perform such duties, as shall be assigned to him by the Board of Directors or by the President (subject to the powers and supervision of the Board), and in the order determined by the Board, shall in the absence, inability, or refusal to act by the President, perform the President's duties and exercise the President's powers, and when so acting shall have all of the powers of and be subject to all of the restrictions upon the President. e. Executive Director. The Board of Directors may select and appoint an Executive Director. The Executive Director shall perform such duties as are provided by these Bylaws and as are delegated to the Executive Director by the President, the Board of Directors or the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors. Without prejudice to the complete authority of the Board of Directors to manage the affairs and properties of the Corporation, the Executive Director shall hire, direct, and discharge all agents and employees and fix their salaries subject to the budget authorized by the Board of Directors. The Executive Director may, under the direction of the President or other officer of the Corporation, act for them as they deem appropriate and shall perform such other duties as shall be required by the Board of Directors. In the event the office of Executive Director is not filled, the President shall perform the duties outlined above. 5.7 Agents and Employees. The Board of Directors may from time to time, in its sole discretion, appoint agents and employees who shall have such authority and shall perform such duties as may be prescribed by the Board. The Board may remove any agent or employee at any time with or without cause. Removal shall be without prejudice to such person's contract rights, if any. The appointment of a person as an agent or employee shall not itself create contract rights. 5.8 Compensation of Agents and Employees. The Corporation may pay reasonable compensation to its agents and employees for services rendered and as authorized and fixed by the Board of Directors, or if the Board delegates such power, then as authorized and fixed by the Board's delegate. The Corporation may reimburse all officers, agents, and employees for their reasonable expenses actually incurred in the performance of their duties to the Corporation. The Board may require officers, agents and employees to give security for the faithful performance of their duties, for which they shall be reimbursed. 5.9 Fiduciary Relationship of Officers. Officers of the Corporation shall be deemed to stand in a fiduciary relationship to the Corporation and its Board of Directors, and shall discharge the duties of their respective positions in good faith, and with that diligence, care, judgment and skill which ordinarily prudent men would exercise under similar circumstances in like positions. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 94 of 195
  • 102. 6. ADMINISTRATIVE 6.1 Fiscal Year. The fiscal year of the Corporation shall be from July 1 to June 30 of the following year, unless otherwise determined by the Board of Directors. 6.2 Corporate Seal. The corporate seal, if any, shall be in such form as may be approved from time to time by the Board of Directors. 6.3 Contracts and Other Documents. The Board may, except as otherwise required by law, the Articles of Incorporation, or these Bylaws, authorize the President of the Corporation to enter into any contract or to execute and deliver any instrument or document on behalf of the Corporation. Such authority may be general or may be confined to specific instances. 6.4 Checks, Drafts, Loans, etc. All checks, drafts, loans or other orders for the payment of money, notes, or other evidence of indebtedness issued in the name of the Corporation shall be signed by such officer or agent of the Corporation and in such manner as shall be from time to time determined by the Board of Directors. The Board may delegate its power under this Section 6.4 only to the President and only on such terms as the Board shall prescribe by resolution. 6.5 Books and Records. The Corporation shall keep at its registered office in the City of Baton Rouge: (1) correct and complete books and records of account; and (2) minutes of the proceedings of the Board of Directors and any committee having any of the authority of the Board. 6.6 Loans to Directors, Officers, Employees and Agents. No loans shall be made by the Corporation to any of its directors, officers, employees or agents. 6.7 Regulations. These Bylaws shall operate merely as regulations among the directors, officers, and Board of Directors of the Corporation, and shall not affect contracts or other dealings with other persons, unless such persons have actual knowledge of these Bylaws. 6.8 Notice. Unless otherwise provided in the Articles of Incorporation or these Bylaws, whenever any notice is required by these Bylaws to be given, personal notice is not required unless expressly so stated; any notice is sufficient if given by depositing the same in an United States mail receptacle in a sealed postage paid envelope addressed to the person entitled thereto at his last known address as it appears on the records of the Corporation; and such notice is deemed to have been given on the day of such mailing. 6.9 Waiver of Notice. Whenever any notice of the time, place or purpose of any meeting of the Board of Directors, directors, or committees is required by law, the Articles of Incorporation, or these Bylaws, a waiver thereof in writing signed at any time by the person or persons entitled to such notice, or actual attendance at such meeting in person (except where participation at such meeting is for the express purpose of objecting to the transaction of business at the meeting), is equivalent to the giving of such notice to such person, except as otherwise provided by law, the Articles of Incorporation or these Bylaws. 7. INDEMNIFICATION AND INSURANCE 7.1 The Corporation may, to the extent permitted by law, indemnify any person who was or is a party or is threatened to be made a party to any action, suit, or proceeding, whether civil, criminal, administrative or investigative (including any action by or in the right of the Corporation) by reason of the fact that he is or was a director, officer, employee, or agent of the Corporation, or is or was serving at the request of the Corporation as a director, officer, Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 95 of 195
  • 103. employee, or agent of another nonprofit, business or foreign corporation, partnership, joint venture, or other enterprise, against expenses (including attorneys' fees), judgments, fines, and amounts paid in settlement actually and reasonably incurred by him in connection with such action, suit, or proceeding if he acted in good faith and in a manner he reasonably believed to be in or not opposed to the best interests of the Corporation, and, with respect to any criminal action or proceeding, had no reasonable cause to believe his conduct was unlawful; provided that in case of actions by or in right of the Corporation, the indemnity shall be limited to expenses (including attorneys' fees and amounts paid in settlement not exceeding, in the judgment of the Board of Directors, the estimated expense of litigating the action to conclusion) actually and reasonably incurred in connection with the defense or settlement of such action and no indemnification shall be made in respect to any claim, issue or matter as to which such person shall have been adjudged to be liable for negligence or misconduct in the performance of his duty to the Corporation unless and only to the extent that the court shall determine upon application that, despite the adjudication of liability but in the view of all the circumstances of the case, he is fairly and reasonably entitled to indemnity for such expenses which the court shall deem proper. The termination of any action, suit, or proceeding by judgment, order, settlement, conviction, or upon a plea of nolo contendere or its equivalent, shall not, of itself, create a presumption that the person did not act in good faith and in a manner which he reasonably believed to be in or not opposed to the best interests of the Corporation, and, with respect to any criminal action or proceeding, that the person had reasonable cause to believe that his conduct was unlawful. 7.2 To the extent that a director, officer, employee, or agent of the Corporation has been successful on the merits or otherwise in defense of any such action, suit, or proceeding, or in defense of any claim, issue or matter therein, he shall be indemnified against expenses (including attorneys' fees) actually and reasonably incurred by him in connection therewith. 7.3 Any indemnification under Section 7.1 (unless ordered by the court) shall be made by the Corporation only as authorized in a specific case upon a determination that the applicable standard of conduct has been met. Such determination shall be made: (i) by the Board of Directors by a majority vote of a quorum consisting of directors who were not parties to such action, suit or proceeding, or (ii) if such quorum is not obtainable or a quorum of disinterested directors is accompanied by an independent legal counsel, or (iii) by the Board of Directors. 7.4 Expenses incurred in defending such an action, suit, or proceeding may be paid by the Corporation in advance of the final disposition thereof if authorized by the Board of Directors in the manner provided in Section 7.3 above, upon receipt of an undertaking by or on behalf of the director, officer, employee, or agent to repay such amount unless it shall ultimately be determined that he is entitled to be indemnified by the Corporation as authorized in this Article VII. 7.5 The indemnification provided by this Article VII shall not be deemed exclusive of any other rights to which the person indemnified may be entitled under any bylaw, agreement, or authorization of Board of Directors or disinterested directors or otherwise, both as to action in his official capacity and as to action in another capacity while holding such office, and shall continue as to a person who has ceased to be a director, officer, employee, or agent and shall inure to the benefit of his heirs and legal representative. 7.6 The Corporation may procure insurance on behalf of any person who is or was a director, officer, employee, or agent of the Corporation, or is or was serving at the request of the Corporation as a director, officer, employee, or agent of another nonprofit, business or foreign corporation, partnership, joint venture, or other enterprise against any liability asserted against or incurred by him in any such capacity, or arising out of his status as such, whether or not the Corporation would have the power to indemnify him against such liability under the Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 96 of 195
  • 104. law. 7.7 The Corporation shall not, under any circumstances, indemnify any employee, officer, director, or any other person for any expenses, including attorney's fees, incurred in connection with any suit or proceeding brought against the Corporation by such persons. 7.8 No director or officer of the Corporation shall be personally liable either to the Corporation or its Board of Directors, if any, for monetary damages for breach of fiduciary duty as a director or officer, provided that such breach does not consist of any of the following: (a) breach of the director's or officer's duty of loyalty to the corporation or its Board of Directors; (b) acts or omissions not in good faith or which involve intentional misconduct or a knowing violation of law; or (c) any transaction from which the director or officer derived an improper personal benefit. This provision shall be effective to eliminate the personal liability of a director or officer for any act or omission occurring prior to the effective date of this provision. 7.8 If any part of this Article VII shall be found in any action, suit, or proceeding to be invalid or ineffective, the validity and the effectiveness of the remaining parts shall not be affected. 8. AMENDMENT OF BYLAWS 8.1 The Bylaws of the Corporation may be adopted, amended, or repealed by a majority vote of the Board of Directors, present or represented at any regular or special meeting. The notice of any regular or special meeting to consider such amendment shall be distributed to each of the Board of Directors at least ten (10) days prior to such meeting and shall set forth the proposed amendment or a summary of the changes to be made. By a vote of two-thirds (2/3) of the members of the Board of Directors, this ten (10) day notice requirement may be waived. 9. CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY 9.1 The purpose of the conflict of interest policy is to protect this tax-exempt Corporationʼs interest when it is contemplating entering into a transaction or arrangement that might benefit the private interest of an officer or director of the Corporation or might result in a possible excess benefit transaction. This policy is intended to supplement but not replace any applicable state and federal laws governing conflict of interest applicable to nonprofit and charitable organizations. The Corporationʼs directors, officers, agents, committee members, and other representatives of the Corporation shall comply with the Louisiana Code of Governmental Ethics in their entirety where applicable. 9.2 Definitions for the purpose of this Section 9. are set forth as follows. a. Interested Person shall mean any director, principal officer, or member of a committee with governing Board delegated powers, who has a direct or indirect financial interest, as defined below, is an interested person. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 97 of 195
  • 105. b. Financial Interest shall mean a person who has, directly or indirectly, through business, investment, or family: i. An ownership or investment interest in any entity with which the Corporation has a transaction or arrangement, ii. A compensation arrangement with the Corporation or with any entity or individual with which the Corporation has a transaction or arrangement, or iii. A potential ownership or investment interest in, or compensation arrangement with, any entity or individual with which the Corporation is negotiating a transaction or arrangement. Compensation includes direct and indirect remuneration as well as gifts or favors that are not insubstantial. A financial interest is not necessarily a conflict of interest. Under Section 9.3, a person who has a financial interest may have a conflict of interest only if the appropriate governing Board or committee decides that a conflict of interest exists. 9.3 Procedures a. Duty to Disclose - In connection with any actual or possible conflict of interest, an interested person must disclose the existence of the financial interest and be given the opportunity to disclose all material facts to the directors and members of committees with governing Board delegated powers considering the proposed transaction or arrangement. b. Determining Whether a Conflict of Interest Exists - After disclosure of the financial interest and all material facts, and after any discussion with the interested person, he/she shall leave the governing Board or committee meeting while the determination of a conflict of interest is discussed and voted upon. The remaining Board or committee members shall decide if a conflict of interest exists. c. Procedures for Addressing the Conflict of Interest i. An interested person may make a presentation at the governing Board or committee meeting, but after the presentation, he/she shall leave the meeting during the discussion of, and the vote on, the transaction or arrangement involving the possible conflict of interest. ii. The chairperson of the governing Board or committee shall, if appropriate, appoint a disinterested person or committee to investigate alternatives to the proposed transaction or arrangement. iii. After exercising due diligence, the governing Board or committee shall determine whether the Corporation can obtain with reasonable efforts a more advantageous transaction or arrangement from a person or entity that would not give rise to a conflict of interest. iv. If a more advantageous transaction or arrangement is not reasonably possible under circumstances not producing a conflict of interest, the governing Board or committee shall determine by a majority vote of the disinterested directors whether the transaction or arrangement is in the Corporationʼs best interest, for its own benefit, and whether it is fair and reasonable. In conformity with the above determination it shall make its decision as to whether to enter into the transaction or arrangement. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 98 of 195
  • 106. 9.4 Violations of the Conflicts of Interest Policy a. If the governing Board or committee has reasonable cause to believe a member has failed to disclose actual or possible conflicts of interest, it shall inform the member of the basis for such belief and afford the member an opportunity to explain the alleged failure to disclose. b. If, after hearing the memberʼs response and after making further investigation as warranted by the circumstances, the governing Board or committee determines the member has failed to disclose an actual or possible conflict of interest, it shall take appropriate disciplinary and corrective action. 9.5 Records of Proceedings - The minutes of the governing Board and all committees with Board delegated powers shall contain: a. The names of the persons who disclosed or otherwise were found to have a financial interest in connection with an actual or possible conflict of interest, the nature of the financial interest, any action taken to determine whether a conflict of interest was present, and the governing Boardʼs or committeeʼs decision as to whether a conflict of interest in fact existed. b. The names of the persons who were present for discussions and votes relating to the transaction or arrangement, the content of the discussion, including any alternatives to the proposed transaction or arrangement, and a record of any votes taken in connection with the proceedings. 9.6 Annual Statements - Each director, principal officer and member of a committee with governing Board delegated powers shall annually sign a statement which affirms such person: a. has received a copy of the conflicts of interest policy; b. has read and understands the policy; c. has agreed to comply with the policy; and d. understands the Corporation is educational and in order to maintain its federal tax exemption it must engage primarily in activities which accomplish one or more of its tax-exempt purposes. 9.7 Periodic Reviews - To ensure the Corporation operates in a manner consistent with its educational and charitable purposes and does not engage in activities that could jeopardize its tax-exempt status, periodic reviews shall be conducted. The periodic reviews shall, at a minimum, include the following subjects: a. whether compensation arrangements and benefits are reasonable, based on competent survey information, and the result of armʼs length bargaining; and b. whether partnerships, joint ventures, and arrangements with management organizations conform to the Corporationʼs written policies, are properly recorded, reflect reasonable investment or payments for goods and services, further charitable purposes and do not result in inurement, impermissible private benefit, or in an excess benefit transaction. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 99 of 195
  • 107. 9. Use of Outside Experts - When conducting the periodic reviews as provided for in Section 9.7, the Corporation may, but need not, use outside advisors. If outside experts are used, their use shall not relieve the governing Board of its responsibility for ensuring periodic reviews are conducted. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 100 of 195
  • 108. Helix School Records Policy The board of Helix establishes this public records policy in compliance with Louisiana Public Records Law, LA-R.S. 44:1 et seq. It is the policy of Helix to make records available to parents and students (over the age of 18) in accordance with state and federal regulations. Requesting Records Parents, legal guardians, and students over the age of 18 have a right to request any of the schoolʼs public records. ! All requests must be made in writing to the main office of the school that has the requested records. ! Within five (5) business days, all requests will receive one of the following responses in writing: o The records are immediately available. o The records will be made available at a later date and time that will be specified in the documentation. o The request is denied. The records will not be made available. The requestor will receive a written explanation for the denial. Reasons for Denial Records may be denied by the school for any of the reasons listed below as defined by Louisiana statute. ! Disclosure would violate state or federal law. ! Disclosure would violate personal privacy. ! Disclosure would harm bargaining negotiations. ! The records are trade secrets that would cause substantial harm if disclosed. ! The records are law enforcement records (per LA R.S. §44:3). ! Disclosure would endanger the life or safety of any person. ! The records are computer access codes. ! The records are purely internal materials (i.e., not statistical or factual collections of data, employee policies or instructions, or external audits). Appeal of a Denial Requestors have the opportunity to appeal a denied request for records. In order to appeal, the following steps must be taken: ! Appellants shall submit a written letter of appeal to the Helix Board of Directors. ! The letter must include the following information: o The records requested o The date of the original request o The reason for denial Board members must respond to the request in writing within ten (10) days of receiving the original request. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 101 of 195
  • 109. Adams and Reese Board Training Syllabus 2009 - 2010 Helix Charter Schools TOPIC 1 Open Meetings Law TOPIC 2 Public Records Law TOPIC 3 Duties of Board of Directors of a Non-Profit Corporation TOPIC 4 Code of Governmental Ethics TOPIC 5 Charter School Reporting, Part 1 TOPIC 6 Charter School Reporting, Part 2 TOPIC 7 Charter School Law, Part 1 TOPIC 8 Charter School Law, Part 2 Examples of training materials are included on the following pages. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 102 of 195
  • 110. SUMMARY OF OPEN MEETINGS LAW INTRODUCTION Louisianaʼs Constitution provides in Art. XII, Section 3, that“no person shall be denied the right to observe the deliberations of public bodies and examine public documents, except in cases established by law.” The laws relating to this provision are known as the “open meetings law”. Definition of a “meeting” Section 4.2 defines a “meeting” as a convening of a “quorum” of a “public body” to deliberate, or to act, on a matter over which the body has supervision, control, jurisdiction, or advisory power. Convening of a quorum of a public body solely to receive information regarding any matter over which the body has supervision, control, jurisdiction or advisory power is also a “meeting”. According to the Attorney General, chance meetings or planned social gatherings of the members of a public body, at which no action, vote, or polling is taken, do not constitute public meetings. 1. Right to Observe Section 5 provides that every “meeting” of a “public body” shall be open to the public, except when closed according to law. Proxy voting and secret balloting are prohibited. 2. Public Comment Section 5.1 requires all public bodies to provide for public comment prior to the board taking any action. The public body may, however, adopt “reasonable rules” to restrict public comment. Many public bodies have adopted rules that place a time limit on comments and require that comments must relate to items on the agenda. Public comment is generally allowed prior to any board action on each separate agenda item. 3. Notice Requirements The public body gives written public notice of the dates, times and places of scheduled meetings. Notices of each meeting must also be given by posting a copy of the notice of the meeting, including the date, time, place and agenda, at the principal office of the public body not less than 24 hours before the meeting. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 103 of 195
  • 111. SUMMARY OF OPEN MEETINGS LAW (conʼt) 4. Agenda A public body may not consider items not noticed on its agenda; however, the agenda of a meeting may be amended during the meeting by a 2/3 vote of the members present at a meeting, in order to discuss an item not on the agenda. The procedure to amend the agenda is to have a board member make a motion to add an item to the agenda and then take a roll- call vote on the motion. If a 2/3 vote of the board approves the addition, the board may then discuss and vote on the additional item. If a public body plans to discuss a matter in executive session (excluding the public) that pertains to prospective litigation, or actual pending litigation, the notice of the agenda of the meeting must reflect this. 5. Conduct of Meetings All votes by the board must be by voice with the number of votes “for”, “against”, or not voting recorded in the minutes of the meeting. 6. Executive Sessions Before an executive or closed session may be held, there must be a formal motion made which is approved by 2/3 of the members present. Executive sessions are permitted for discussion only. The topics which may be discussed in Executive Session are: ! Discussion of the character, competence, physical health, or mental health of a person. ! Strategy on collective bargaining, prospective litigation, and pending litigation. ! Security personnel, plans, or devices. ! Investigation of misconduct. ! Natural disasters and epidemic or civil disturbances. ! State Mineral Board meetings where records or matters entitled to confidential status are to be considered or discussed. ! Discussion between the school board and a student or the studentʼs parent; however, the student or parent may demand an open meeting. ! Civil service board meetings where there is discussion of test questions, answers, and papers produced and exhibited by the office of the state examiner, municipal fire, and police civil service. ! Second Injury Board meetings where records or matters regarding the settlement of a workersʼ compensation claim are required to be considered/discussed. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 104 of 195
  • 112. SUMMARY OF OPEN MEETINGS LAW (conʼt) 7. Minutes of Meeting All public bodies must keep written minutes consisting of: ! Date, time and place of meeting ! Members present or absent. ! Substance of all matters decided; and record or roll-call of the individual votes of membersʼ vote if a member requests such. This request would have to be made before the vote is taken to have an individual roll-call vote recorded in the minutes. A public body could also adopt a standing rule to provide for an entry in the minutes how each member votes. ! The individual roll-call vote on a motion to go into executive session always must be reported in the minutes, even without a memberʼs request. ! The minutes and audio or video tapes are public records and must be made available within a reasonable time after a meeting. ! Citizensʼ Advisory Committees do not have to keep minutes. 8. Enforcement Enforcement procedures by the Attorney General, or a District Attorney or a citizen may file a civil suit to challenge an illegal meeting or to prevent future illegal meetings. Remedies may include one or more of the following: ! Mandamus to perform certain duties. ! Injunction against future violations. ! To declare action taken at an illegal meeting void. ! Impose civil penalties, up to $100/person/violation, which would be the violatorʼs personal liability and may not be reimbursed. ! Punishment for contempt of court for violation of a prior court order or injunction. ! Obtain court costs and attorney fees. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 105 of 195
  • 113. Summary of Public Records Law* Electors and taxpayers have a constitutional right to have access to public records and documents. LSA Const. Art. XII, Section 3. 1. What is public record? Louisiana law states that “All books, records, writings, accounts, letters and letter books, maps, drawings, photographs, cards, tapes, recordings, memoranda, and papers, and all copies, duplicates, photographs, including microfilm, or other reproductions thereof, or any other documentary materials, regardless of physical form or characteristics, including information contained in electronic data processing equipment, having been used, being in use, or prepared, possessed, or retained for use in the conduct, transaction, or performance of any business, transaction, work, duty, or function which was conducted, transacted, or performed by or under the authority of the constitution or laws of this state, or by or under the authority of any ordinance, regulation, mandate, or order of any public body or concerning the receipt or payment of any money received or paid by or under the authority of the constitution or the laws of this state, are ʻpublic recordsʼ, except as otherwise provided in this Chapter or the Constitution of Louisiana.” LSA R.S. 44:1 A.(2)(a). This definition from the statutes is very broad. The Attorney General summarizes this definition to “any documentary materials without regard to their physical form or characteristics, which were used, are being used or which were retained for use by a ʻPublic Bodyʼ are public records.. .” Public records include e-mails. 2. What is a “public body”? The phrase “public body” means any branch, department, office, agency, board, commission, district, governing authority, political subdivision, or any committee, subcommittee, advisory board, or task force thereof, or any other instrumentality of state, parish, or municipal government, including a public or quasi-public nonprofit corporation,designated as an entity to perform a governmental or proprietary function. LSA R.S. 44:1 A.(1). This includes a Charter School Board. 3. Who is responsible for making those records available to the public? A “custodian” is the person that heads the “public body” and is responsible for the production of any public record. For a Board of Directors this would usually be the Chairperson or Executive Director. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 106 of 195
  • 114. Summary of Public Records Law (Conʼt) 4. Are there any exceptions to this law? Yes, though these exceptions are limited in number and are very specific in scope. They are outlined in Title 44 of the Revised Statutes. Exceptions are very specific. Exceptions may include, for example, any writings, records, or other accounts that reflect the mental impressions, conclusions, opinions, or theories of an attorney or an expert, obtained or prepared in anticipation of litigation or in preparation for trial. 5. What about privacy? Article I, Section 5 of the Louisiana Constitution allows that persons are protected from “unreasonable invasions of privacy.” There are no legislative provisions that define this in detail. Therefore, it is left up to the Courts to decide if someone is protected under this privacy clause. 6. Who may obtain these records? And what information can the custodian obtain from them? Anyone over the age of 18 may inspect, copy, or reproduce anypublic record. But as an aside, the custodian has the burden of proving that a record is not subject to inspection, copying or reproduction. The only information the custodian can request from the requesting person is his age and identification, and the requesting person can be required to sign a register. 7. Are there any rules for inspecting, copying, or reproduction of public records? The custodian must give all reasonable aid and comfort to the person requesting. If the record contains both public and private information, the custodian may separate the two to allow access only to the non-restricted information, in accordance with laws governing confidentiality, exemptions, or privacy. The custodian shall provide copies at a reasonable charge, unless person is indigent, in which case, the information is provided at no charge. If a situation arises that questions whether the document is subject to inspection, the custodian has three (3) days to make a determination and notify the requesting party. If the record requested is not immediately available, the custodian must make it available within three (3) days. In the case of absence of a record, the custodian must give a certificate stating: ! The reason for absence ! Current location ! Who has the record ! When it was taken from the custodian In this certificate, the custodian must also answer any questions posed by requesting person. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 107 of 195
  • 115. 8. Are there any consequences in denying someone the right to inspect a record? Yes. If the custodian denies him the right to inspect a document OR five (5) days have passed since the request, the requesting party may file a civil suit for mandamus, injunction, or declaratory relief, and may receive attorneyʼs fees, court costs, and damages if proven successful. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 108 of 195
  • 116. Duties of Board of Director Members Three Duties to the Organization 1. Duty of Care - Louisiana Civil Law Treatise § 22.02 Generally: the degree of diligence, skill and care that a prudent man, in a similar position and under similar circumstances, would exercise. Specifically, a director should: ! Act in good faith. ! Use the degree of care a reasonable person in similar situations would. ! Act in the best interest of the organization. Every director and officer shares the same duty of care. If a member raises an issue, which he is knowledgeable about, the board should then call attention to this issue, and then discuss how to handle it. 2. Duty of Loyalty - Louisiana Civil Law Treatise § 22.03 Loyalty to the organizationʼs mission. Board Members should act in good faith and in a manner that they reasonably believe is in the best interest of the organization. 3. Duty of Obedience Obeying the objectives Directors must ensure that the organization is obeying its own objectives and bylaws. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 109 of 195
  • 117. Duties of Board of Director Members (conʼt) Liability of Directors and Officers Louisiana Law offers protection to board members and directors: RS 9:2792.1 - A person who serves as a director, officer, or trustee of a nonprofit organization qualified as a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, as amended, and who is not compensated for such services on a salary basis shall not be individually liable for any act or omission resulting in damage or injury, arising out of the exercise of his judgment in the formation and implementation of policy or arising out of the management of the affairs of the organization while acting as a director, officer, or trustee of that organization, provided he was acting in good faith and within the scope of his official functions and duties, unless such damage or injury was caused by the willful or wanton misconduct of such person. Corporations may also indemnify its directors, officers, employees and agents: LA R.S. 12:227 If the party: ! Acted in good faith, ! Acted in a manner he believed to be in the best interests of the organization ! Had no reason to believe the conduct of the party was unlawful. Such Indemnification shall include any actual and reasonable expenses incurred (including attorneyʼs fees). Indemnification (unless ordered by the court),shall be made only upon determination that the applicable standard of conduct has been met. Such determination shall be made by: ! A quorum of directors, from the board of directors who were not parties to the action, suit or proceeding, by a majority vote; ! Independent legal counsel; or ! The members of the board. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 110 of 195
  • 118. Helix Network of Charter Schools Helix High School: STEM Enrollment Projection Chart Grade Level Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Freshmen 125 125 125 125 125 Sophomores 0 125 125 125 125 Juniors 0 0 125 125 125 Seniors 0 0 0 125 125 TOTAL 125 250 375 500 500 Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 111 of 195
  • 119. Appendix: Helix Enrollment Policy and Procedures Admissions Criteria Charter schools are public schools and are therefore open to all Louisiana students on a space-available basis. The school may not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, creed, sex, ethnicity, sexual orientation, mental or physical disability, ancestry, athletic performance, special need, proficiency in the English language or in a foreign language, or prior academic achievement when recruiting or admitting students. Moreover, the school may not set admissions criteria that are intended to discriminate or that have the effect of discriminating based on any of these characteristics. The school has an interest in making sure that all prospective students and their families understand the mission and focus of the school and are interested in being a part of the school community. The school requires: ! Candidates for admission to apply for the grade immediately following their current grade, and to successfully complete their current grade to be admitted. ! Students to be residents of Louisiana at the time that they submit a Lottery Enrollment Form (attached) and at the time that they are offered admission.34 and strongly advises and requests: ! Parents/ guardians and students to attend an informational session and orientation session prior to enrollment. ! Parents/guardians and students to sign compacts that demonstrate their agreement with and understanding of the school's mission. The school will not: ! Give preference to children of staff members or Board members; ! Give preference to siblings of students accepted to the school but not yet attending; or ! Make statements in meetings intended to discourage, or that have the effect of discouraging, parents/guardians of students with disabilities, students with limited English proficiency, or any other protected group of students from submitting an lottery enrollment form to the school Outreach The school provides information about the school to those who are interested throughout the year. The school provides lottery enrollment forms at its Information Sessions, which are to be held in January prior to the schoolʼs first academic year, and in December, January, and 34 Students are offered admission if their names are drawn in the lottery or if another student declines an offer of admission/transfers out of the school and their name comes up on the waiting list. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 112 of 195
  • 120. February of each successive year for interested applicants. The school provides lottery enrollment forms in the languages of the community. If a family is unable to attend an information session, the school will mail an enrollment form. The recruitment and enrollment process is an extensive outreach effort that includes advertisement in local newspapers and at local libraries, community centers, churches, and schools. The school does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, creed, ethnicity, sexual orientation, mental or physical disability, age, ancestry, athletic performance, special needs, proficiency in English language or foreign language, or prior academic achievement. Attendance at Information Sessions is strongly encouraged for students and their families. The school will strive to make accommodations for families with individual hardships. Enrollment Process ! For a given school year beginning, the school will publicize its three information sessions and invite families to attend and to complete a lottery enrollment form. Families who are unable to attend any of these sessions, for whatever reason, will be sent a lottery enrollment form by mail. Returning students or those students currently on a waiting list do not have to reapply. The school will contact all families on this list. ! The school will accept Lottery Enrollment Forms until February 26th of the year in which the lottery will take place. ! After this initial lottery enrollment period, the school will conduct a lottery prior to March 1st, publicizing the date, time, and location with reasonable notice of at least one week before the lottery date. ! The school will set a final date for students to accept offers of enrollment and the actual date of enrollment. ! If a second lottery is necessary, forms submitted after February 26th will enter a second lottery on June 1st. If there is a waiting list, these students will go to the bottom of the waiting list in the order that they are chosen from the lottery. ! The school will publicize all lottery enrollment deadlines and the fact that there will be a lottery if there are more eligible applicants than there are available spaces within a given lottery enrollment process, with reasonable public notice of at least one week. After the lottery enrollment deadline passes, The school will divide all lottery enrollment forms into three categories, as follows. ! Siblings – Students who share a common parent, either biologically or legally through adoption. Whether the children reside in the same household has no bearing on determining if the children are siblings for purposes of a sibling preference. Children who live in separate households may be siblings, and those that live in the same household may not be. If siblings are placed in foster homes and one of them enrolls in the charter school, then the siblings of that student are entitled to admission preference. Foster children are not considered siblings of other children in the foster home unless they share a common parent. ! Residents - Students who live in the city or town in which the charter school is located (Baton Rouge). Residents enrolled in district, charter, private, or parochial schools or enrolling in schools in the district get equal preference. The percentage of students Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 113 of 195
  • 121. admitted from East Baton Rouge parish is defined based on a percentage scale to allow other students from surrounding districts to enroll in the regional school. ! Non-residents - Students who live outside the city or town in which the charter school is located (Baton Rouge). Non-residents enrolled in district, charter, private, or parochial schools or enrolling in schools in the district will be weighted by percentage of students to allow a certain percentage from each district to enroll in the school. Preference for admission is given first to applicants in the "Siblings" category, followed by applicants in the “Residents” category and then by applicants in the “Non-Residents” category without regard to when their lottery enrollment form was submitted, as long as it was prior to the lottery enrollment deadline. The school will either extend an offer of admission to all applicants within a group (Siblings, Residents or Non-residents) that meet the lottery enrollment deadline or select applicants randomly using a lottery. The school will not offer admission to applicants on a first come first served basis. Lottery If there are more eligible applicants in any of the categories (“Siblings”, "Residents" or “Non- Residents”) than there are spaces available, the school must hold a lottery to determine which applicants will receive an offer of admission. As previously mentioned, the school must give reasonable public notice of the lottery at least one week before the lottery date. The school must have an individual without any connection to the school randomly draw the names of all students who submitted lottery enrollment forms before the deadline. After the available slots are filled, the individual shall keep drawing the names of the remaining applicants in each category and place them on a waiting list in the order they are drawn. If the school does not reach capacity after admitting eligible “Siblings” and "Residents," then it may admit non-resident applicants. In this case, the school must hold a lottery, under the same rules as outlined above, to select non-resident students for the remaining spaces, if there are more non-resident applicants than spaces available. Waiting List The school will maintain a waiting list for applicants who were not selected through the lottery. The waiting list will be maintained by district from which the applicant resides. The school will target a specific percentage of students in each district from which the school will draw in the region. Enrollment Confirmation Families will be notified at the lottery and by mail of their admission status (acceptance or placement on waiting list). If a student declines an offer of admission, the school will immediately contact the family of the student on the top of the waiting list. All families of students admitted to the school will receive an enrollment packet with all of the forms necessary to enroll (such as Proof of Residency, Student Information, and Records Release Form). If a student is accepted in the lottery, that family must confirm by March 15th that the student will attend the school. To ensure that the student is able to enroll, the family must fill out and submit all required documents by April 15th. The school will hold an Orientation Session before the start of school to prepare new families and students for the transition to the school and to assist families with any remaining paperwork. If a student is selected from the waiting list and the family is notified before June 1st, the family will have 5 days to confirm enrollment. If the family is notified after June 1st, the family will have 3 days to confirm enrollment. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 114 of 195
  • 122. Helix Network of Educational Choices Lottery Enrollment Form – Academic Year 2010-2011 We ask that you fill out this lottery enrollment form completely. This information will be kept confidential. The only parts of the lottery enrollment form that affect the lottery are: RESIDENCE and SIBLING STATUS. The lottery is held at the school on March 1, 2010. We will mail students accepted by means of the lottery results on March 15th. The school does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, national origin, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, mental or physical disability, special needs, English language proficiency, athletic ability, or academic achievement. Student First Name: _____________ Middle Name: ____________ Last Name: __________ Social Security Number: __ __ __ - __ __ - __ __ __ __ Address: __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth: __/ __ /__ Age: _____ City of Birth: __________ Gender: (circle one) M F Current Grade (2008-2009): ______ Name of Current School:____________________ Applying for Grade (for 2010-2011): 9 Parent / Guardian Relationship to Student: Relationship to Student: ________________ __________________ Name: Name: _______________________________ ________________________________ Address:__________________________ Address: ____ ______________________________ City, State, Zip: City, State, Zip: _______________________ ________________________ Home Phone: Home Phone: _________________________ __________________________ Work Phone: Work Phone: __________________________ __________________________ Email Email address: address:_________________________ _________________________ Optional Information – NOT used in lottery enrollment process Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 115 of 195
  • 123. Primary Languages spoken in the home: __________________________________________ Primary Language spoken by student: ____________________________________________ Is the student currently receiving special education services? (circle one) YES NO If so, what type of service does she/he receive? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Race / Ethnicity The state has redefined these categories to allow individuals the opportunity to select one or more race when reporting. In addition, race and Hispanic origin are considered two separate concepts. Please select one Ethnicity and one Race box for your student: Ethnicity: Hispanic or Latino Not Hispanic or Latino Race: American Indian or Alaskan Native Hawaiian or Other Native Pacific Islander Asian White Black or African American Understanding of Expectations Student Understanding. I understand that, if admitted to the school, I will be expected to sign a contract in which I agree to attend school regularly, on time, and be prepared to work hard; to follow the schoolʼs code of conduct; and to help build an academically focused and safe community. In addition, I will attend the Orientation session and begin school on Monday, July 5th. ____________________________________ _____________ Student Applicant Signature Date Parent/Guardian Understanding. I wish to enroll my child in the school and understand that the school will provide an academically rigorous education. I am prepared to be an active partner in my childʼs education by signing a contract in which I agree to ensure that my child attends school regularly, arrives on time and prepared to work, and follows the schoolʼs code of conduct; volunteering at the school and participating in school activities; signing weekly progress reports and attending family conferences; and maintaining regular communication with my childʼs teachers regarding academic and behavioral performance. In addition, I will attend the Orientation session and the Family Focus Sessions. ____________________________________ _____________ Parent/Guardian Signature Date Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 116 of 195
  • 124. Enrollment Timeline 25 October – 1 November Establish start-up office Identify office support staff Install equipment for application data system Provide training to office support staff, as needed 8 November – 15 November Prepare and mail announcements about enrollment process to parents Identify community liaisons Solicit and organize parent support 24 November – 1 December Customize student intent forms (English and Spanish; other languages as needed 8 December – 15 December Review and approve student intent forms 25 December – 1 January Duplicate and distribute intent form to community Prepare materials for community presentations 1 January – 8 January Conduct community presentations 19 February – 26 February Monitor completed student intent forms for number and compliance with diversity goals 22 February – 1 March Conduct student lottery, if necessary 23 February – 2 March Establish list of accepted students Establish waiting list, if necessary 8 March – 15 March Send letters inviting selected students to enroll Begin enrollment process 27 April – 4 May Send letters informing other applicants of waiting list status 8 June – 15 June Review IEP, bilingual, and ESOL requirements for special needs students35 24 September – 1 October Continue monitoring of student enrollment count day. 35 Earliest opportunity to review student needs; ongoing as needed (for details, see Special Education Appendix) Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 117 of 195
  • 125. Helix Network of Educational Choices presents CHARTER SCHOOLS INFORMATION NIGHT Saturday January 16, 2010 5:00 PM at the Shaw Center for the Arts 100 Lafayette Street East Baton Rouge Learn about this new education opportunity in East Baton Rouge ! Find out what charter schools are ! Find out how your child can attend for free ! Find out the benefits of this school for you and your family There are plans to open a new school for the fall of 2010 that will serve students in 9th grade. At this meeting, we will explain what we are trying to do and how it can help you, your family, and our community. Your participation is very important to us. FOOD WILL BE SERVED. NO COST TO ATTEND. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 118 of 195
  • 126. Appendix: School Staffing Chart Proposed School Staffing Chart for Year One: Staffing Chart Instructional Staff FTE Master Teacher 2 Subject Area and Electives Teacher 5 School Social Worker .5 Special Education Teacher 1 Non-Instructional Staff FTE Executive Director .5 School Leader 1 School Secretary .5 Data Manager .5 Technology/Data .5 Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 119 of 195
  • 127. HELIX PERSONNEL POLICY I. Certification and Licensure A. Regular Teaching Staff Full time, regular teaching staff, further defined by the terms of the charter as "core" teachers, shall be certified by the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education with either a permanent or preliminary credential and shall be required to pass any required state credentialing exam. However, teachers-in-training who are working toward a credential and others with specialized and appropriate experience may also be retained if their skills and abilities will further the educational mission of the Charter School and if they obtain the emergency credential. B. Non-Core Teaching Staff Non-core teachers are not required to hold credentials but must demonstrate subject knowledge and the ability to work well with students. C. Other Staff, Substitutes, and Consultants All other staff must demonstrate the abilities necessary to effectively carry out their responsibilities. D. Continuing Education All teachers are expected to keep their professional training and knowledge current through ongoing courses and workshops in education. The principal will work with staff to develop professional growth plans consistent with section III.B. This may be accomplished at local colleges and universities, or by whatever means such advanced training is available. II. Requirements for Employment ! Employees are expected to adhere to the requirements for employment described in the Charter and personnel policies. ! All first-year employees without credentials must submit fingerprints to the Department of Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigation for the purpose of obtaining a criminal record summary as required by LA-R.S. 15:587.1 and SBESE Policy for Charter Schools Relative to Criminal Offenses. Such fingerprints must be submitted prior to employment and are a condition of employment. A criminal history review, conducted through the Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections, Office of State Police, Bureau of Criminal Identification, shall also be administered. Criminal record summaries will be maintained by the principal in a secure file, which will be kept separate from personnel files. ! All employees of the proposed school shall comply with criminal background checks and with Board policies relative to the employment of persons with a criminal history as per state and federal law. ! No person who has been convicted of or has pleaded nolo contendere to a crime listed in R.S. 15:587.1(c) shall be hired by a public charter school or public school system for a position of supervisory or disciplinary authority over school children unless approved in writing by a district judge of the parish and the district attorney. No person employed or otherwise associated with the charter school, including any contact person listed on the charter school application or any member of the management board, who has been convicted of or has pleaded nolo contendere to a crime related to misappropriation of funds or theft, shall be engaged in direct processing of charter school funds. In order to comply with this section of the personnel policy, all applicants will be required to complete a written application form asking if they have been convicted of or have pleaded nolo contendere to any of the crimes listed in R.S. 15:587.1(c). (A list will be provided for reference.) Applicants who provide false answers are subject to termination. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 120 of 195
  • 128. ! Employees are expected to conduct themselves at all times in a manner consistent with the highest standards of personal character and professionalism, with students, parents, prospective parents, co-workers, and the community. III. Dismissal, Discipline, and Termination A. The principal may terminate or suspend the employment of any employee if s/he determines that the employee has failed to fulfill the duties and responsibilities and/or demonstrate the qualities outlined in the job description, or if other good cause exists. All employees will be hired on the basis of annual contracts, and their terms will expire at the end of their annual contract. In the event that the school finds it necessary or desirable to terminate an employee's employment before the end of the school year, the school will attempt to give the employee written notice at least 10 calendar days before termination, unless the principal determines that the employee poses a threat to the health, safety, or welfare of the school or students. B. In the event that an employee finds it necessary to resign during the school year, the employee shall give written notice to the principal/principal as soon as possible and at least 10 calendar days before the effective date of resignation. C. In the event of termination of employment prior to the end of an employment contract, the employee shall be entitled only to the prorated salary and benefits earned through the last date of employment. D. Any employee may submit a grievance regarding dismissal, discipline, and termination, pursuant to the grievance process outlined in Section IX, below. IV. Personnel Evaluation A. Confidential Personnel File The school shall maintain a confidential personnel file for each employee. The personnel file will contain the evaluation documents discussed in this section, as well as any other employment-related documents or correspondence. All documents placed in the personnel file will have been signed by all concerned parties. B. Professional Development Portfolio All instructional and professional staff will create and maintain a Personal Development Portfolio containing the goals and outcomes of the school and the employee's personal plan for meeting those goals and outcomes and for continuous improvement. After an initial meeting between the principal, director of achievement, and employee, at which time mutual goals will be reviewed and a professional growth program developed, the employee will create the Portfolio, and include samples of classroom or school work, personal reflections, and any other material deemed appropriate as evidence of continuous improvement. C. Employee Observations All employees will be observed on an ongoing basis by the director of achievement, using both formal and informal observations. Formal observations will include a pre-observation conference as well as a post-observation conference. First-year employees shall have at least two formal observations prior to the three-month review outlined in Section D below. Prior to the six-month review, described in Section D, at least two additional formal observations will be conducted for first-year employees. Returning staff will have three formal observations prior to the six-month review, described in Section E below. Results of formal observations, consisting of the employee's and the director of achievement's observations and recommendations, will be put in writing and included within the employee's own Personal Development Portfolio and the school's personnel file. Nothing in this section limits the principal or director of achievement from conducting other observations of an informal or unannounced nature. D. Formal Reviews - First Year Employees For all first year employees, there shall be a formal review three months after the start of the school year. The purpose of the three-month review shall be to review the employee's self-assessment, the job description, areas of responsibility, and progress toward goals Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 121 of 195
  • 129. and outcomes, noting particularly good work, areas for improvement and skill development, and deficient work, and developing a clear plan for improvement. In addition, at the three-month review, the employee will provide feedback to the principal on the principal's job performance, and the principal will share with the employee his/her own self-assessment. Any written feedback or self-assessment materials may be placed into the principal's personnel file. After six months from the start of the school year, a second review will be held to determine progress made toward the improvement plan. At that time, the principal will inform the employee and report to the Executive Director and Board of Directors whether the school intends to continue employment for the subsequent school year. Results of these reviews will be put in writing and placed within the employee's own Personal Development Portfolio and the school's personnel file. E. Formal Reviews - Returning Employees For returning staff, after the first year of operation, there shall be a formal review six months after the start of the school year. The purpose of the review will be to review progress toward the employee's personal plan and professional growth program described above in Section B. In addition, the employee will provide feedback to the principal on the principal's job performance, and the principal will share with the employee his/her own self-assessment. Any written feedback and the principal's self-assessment may be placed into the principal's personnel file. At that time, the principal will inform the employee and report to the Executive Director whether the school intends to continue employment for the subsequent school year. Results of these reviews will be put in writing and placed within the employee's own Personal Development Portfolio and the school's personnel file. F. Principal Evaluation The principal shall be evaluated by the Executive Director prior to the end of each year's contract based on criteria set forth by job responsibilities. Results shall be in writing and included in the employee's Personal Development Portfolio and personnel file. G. Response to Observation and Review Findings All employees will have the right to make written objections to the observations or review findings within one week of receipt by stating areas of disagreement. These objections will be attached to the observation and/or evaluation and kept in the employee's personnel file. V. Schedule ! All employees are required to work according to the schedule and dates stated in their employment agreements. Full-time staff members are expected to be present at the school from 15 minutes prior to the beginning of the normal school day to 15 minutes after the end of the normal school day, unless other arrangements are approved by the principal. ! In addition, teachers are required to participate in programs related to their professional duties that may be held outside school hours. These days include teacher in-service sessions conducted within the regular work hours, staff meetings, parent- teacher-student conferences, and two informational nights. Teachers may also be required to participate in 30 hours of additional duties per year. ! All other employees are encouraged to attend school functions and events. ! All full-time employees shall have a minimum lunch break of 30 minutes per day. ! Employees are required to perform yard duty as directed, before, after, and during the school day. VI. Leaves A. Sick Leave Sick leave is available to employees to provide for full salary and benefits for absences due to personal illness or injury that prevent the employee from working or for the following reasons: ! Appearance in court as an interested party or under subpoena. ! Death of an immediate family member. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 122 of 195
  • 130. ! An emergency caused by an accident or illness that requires the employee to be absent from work. Full-time staff shall accrue sick leave at the rate of 10 days per school year. If specified in the employee's contract, part-time staff, or staff working part of the school year, shall accrue sick leave on a prorated basis to reflect the proportion of time or working months that the employee's schedule represents in relation to a full time schedule. Employees may accrue up to 10 unused days of sick leave to be carried over across school years if their annual contract is renewed, for a total maximum accrual of 20 days of sick leave. Sick leave is granted for only the reasons listed above and will not be paid out if not utilized, if the employee is terminated, or if the employee's contract is not renewed. All employees shall inform the principal of an anticipated absence as soon as possible, and such leave (other than for unexpected circumstances) must be preapproved by the principal. The principal may require an employee to verify the claimed reason for any absence. B. Personal Leave The principal may grant up to two days of leave per employee per year for urgent personal business or other emergencies. Such leave shall be at full pay and benefits but with cost of substitute deducted. Such leave may not be accrued and will not be paid out for any reason if not used. C. Long Term Leave Long term leave shall be defined as unpaid leave for pregnancy, post-childbirth maternity or paternity, adoption, employee long-term illness, and any other reasons required by law. The school may require certification from a qualified medical professional to document the reason for the leave and/or to verify the employee's ability to return to work. Such leave shall be given for a maximum of up to 12 consecutive weeks, or longer if required by law. In no event shall such leave extend beyond the end of the employee's annual contract unless the contract is renewed. Such leave is available to full-time staff only who have been employed for at least one full school year. Any health benefits provided to the employee by the school will continue to be provided during this leave. Whenever possible, such leave must be pre-approved by the principal and at least 30 days advance notice shall be given by the employee. D. Jury Duty Upon notification by a court to report for jury duty, the employee shall immediately request jury duty during non-school months. In the event this request is not granted, time off with no loss of salary limited to two (2) weeks will be provided for jury duty required to be served during the school year. Any employee, when advised of his/her notification of jury duty, must immediately inform the principal. Salary will be paid as usual, and the check for juror fees is to be signed over to the school. E. Professional Development Leave Full-time employees are entitled to the equivalent of one paid day during the school year for training purposes. Such training must be approved by the principal in advance. See Section I (D) above. VII. Punctuality and Attendance Any employee who is unable to report for work on any particular day must call the principal at least one hour before the start of the scheduled work day. If an employee fails to report to work without notification to the principal, the school may consider that employee has abandoned his/her employment and has voluntarily terminated the employment. In such cases, the school must provide notice to the employee of the decision, and the employee may file a grievance pursuant to the process outlined in Section IX below if the employee disputes the decision. Upon returning to work after an absence for any reason, the employee must complete an absence form and turn it in to the principal by the end of the work day on which the employee returns. If an employee is absent for medical reasons for more than 10 working days, the employee must, immediately upon his or her intended day of return to work, provide the Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 123 of 195
  • 131. principal with a physician's statement certifying that the employee is able to return. VIII. Salaries The principal will propose salary rates in accordance with the terms of the Charter and will present them for approval to the Board of Directors. IX. Employee Grievance Procedure A. In the event of a dispute involving employment or the implementation of the personnel policies, and after a good faith effort with the supervisor to thoroughly resolve the dispute, all employees may submit their complaints following the procedures outlined below. The good faith effort will include problem identification, possible solutions, selection of resolution, timeline for implementation, and follow-up. A written summary of the good faith effort will be included in the personnel file. Failure to follow the procedures and timelines below constitutes a waiver of the employee's right to grieve. ! The employee may submit his/her grievance in writing to the Executive Director within five days of a failed good faith effort to resolve the dispute. ! Within ten working days of receipt of the written complaint, the Executive Director shall schedule a hearing at a mutually convenient time and place for discussion of the complaint with all parties involved. In no event will the hearing take place later than 20 days after receipt of the written complaint and after notification to the employee. ! A decision as established by the Executive Director about the grievance shall be rendered within five working days of the completion of the hearing. Any such proceedings shall be conducted in closed session, unless requested otherwise by the employee. In the event that additional information, investigation, or hearings are necessary after the initial hearing, the hearing may be continued and the final decision shall be made within five working days of the last committee hearing, or as soon thereafter as is practicable. Any additional proceedings shall be completed as soon as is practical. ! The decision of the Executive Director shall be final unless appealed by the employee to the Board of Directors, which may review and modify the decision of the Executive Director if it finds that the Committee failed to properly follow the grievance process described above. A request for an appeal may be submitted to the Founder of the Board within five days of the decision of the Executive Director. After receiving an appeal request, the Founder shall schedule a meeting to consider such an appeal at soon as practical. Board members who are interested parties, as defined in the Bylaws, shall excuse themselves from reviews of the Executive Directorʼs decision to the extent permitted under law. Any such proceedings shall be conducted in closed session, unless requested otherwise by the employee. X. Health and Welfare Benefits A. Health Benefits The school will attempt to provide its staff with health, dental, and vision insurance coverage that is reasonably comparable with coverage provided by the sponsor district to its employees, provided such coverage is commercially or otherwise available at reasonable cost. The school will pay the cost of such coverage for full-time employees. Part-time employees may also request such coverage, and the cost of such coverage will be prorated between the School and the Employee. The school contribution shall represent the proportion the hours worked by the employee bears to a full-time equivalent position. No staff member will receive paid health benefits beyond his/her term of employment. B. Welfare Benefits The school will attempt to secure State Teachers Retirement System eligibility for all eligible core teachers and will pay the required employer contribution for such benefits if available and to the extent requested by the employee. The school will also attempt to secure Public Employees Retirement System eligibility for all eligible staff and make the Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 124 of 195
  • 132. required employer contribution for such benefits, if available and to the extent requested by the employee. The school will make the required employer contribution toward federal Social Security for those employees not covered by STRS. XI. Nondiscrimination The school does not discriminate in any personnel matters or in the provision of programs and services on any basis prohibited by law. Any employee who has been the subject of discrimination or harassment may bring questions, concerns, and/or complaints to either the principal or the Executive Director. XII. Health Services To the extent that it may be necessary for employees to come in contact with bodily fluids, employees are required to use Universal Precautions as per the policy. Failure to do so will result in a formal sanction may result in other disciplinary action. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 125 of 195
  • 133. Helix Student Discipline Policy A school cannot function smoothly unless students are willing to cooperate with teachers and obey the rules of the school. School discipline procedures are no more or less than cooperative responsibilities between all students and teachers (a framework from which a student progresses to good citizenship). Our school exists in order to provide students with the best possible educational opportunities; it is essential, therefore, that the conduct of all students at all times is conducive to facilitating mutual learning and cooperation between students, faculty, and administration. Teachers are responsible for correcting student misbehavior, not only in the classroom but in any school-related environment. If the student refuses to accept teacher correction, s/he will be taken immediately to the academy leader. CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR PLAN All Helix School students are expected to follow the Code of Conduct at all times. If a choice is made to breach the Code of Conduct, the following plan will be implemented. This Behavior Plan is the general procedure a teacher uses to manage the classroom. At times, a studentʼs behavior may warrant immediate action under the Discipline Plan or other measures to be taken. Thus, the Behavior Plan serves as a set of guidelines for common classroom procedures to address minor infractions. DISCIPLINE POLICY Helix Schools place a strong emphasis on establishing a safe and orderly learning environment. Through the collective work of teachers, parents, and administrators, students will learn that problems are solved through open discussion, acceptance of the opinions of others, and personal responsibility. Values such as wisdom, justice, courage, compassion, hope, respect, responsibility, and integrity are reflected in the schoolʼs code of conduct, modeled in all interactions among members of the school community, and taught directly to students. Building strong character is fundamental to creating a positive learning environment and will be at the core of our Student Advisories. Discipline at a Helix School is understood as positive efforts to teach and reinforce the expected behaviors and help young people accept responsibility for their actions. While it may be necessary on occasion to impose appropriate consequences should a student choose to behave in a manner that violates school policies, discipline consistently emphasizes prevention and is based on a system of behavior supports designed to minimize anti-social behaviors. A Helix Schoolʼs discipline model provides: ! Direct teaching of the code of conduct, so that all students can know and demonstrate expected student behavior, as well as show respect for all persons in authority ! Consistent use of incentives to reinforce positive student behaviors ! A school-wide effort to prevent student discipline problems ! A means for students acquire skills in conflict resolution and problem solving, and increasingly to develop a positive attitude, self-discipline, and socially acceptable behaviors ! Early identification and resolution of discipline problems ! Communication to students, teachers, parents, and the community that disruptive and disrespectful behaviors will not be tolerated Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 126 of 195
  • 134. In order to establish a safe and orderly learning environment, all members of the school community - teachers, support staff, students, and parents – must model behaviors that show respect for each other and persons in authority. Helix believes all members of the school community are responsible for modeling the behaviors listed below. Student Responsibilities: Students are expected to: ! Act in a responsible manner, exhibiting respect towards others ! Participate actively in the process of their education ! Accept responsibility for their behavior ! Cooperate with the school staff in maintaining safety, order, and a disciplined environment ! Follow established school and classroom codes of conduct and rules, including safety and school bus rules ! Attend all classes regularly and on time ! Maintain appropriate dress ! Respect the rights and property of others Parent and Guardian Responsibilities: Parents and guardians of students are expected to participate in their studentʼs education in the following ways: ! Communicate routinely with their studentʼs teacher. ! Keep informed about school policies and their studentʼs academic expectations, including homework. ! Ensure that their student attends school regularly, arrives on time, and prepares for classes. ! Alert the school to specific problems or difficulties that may impede the studentʼs learning or well-being. Teacher and Staff Responsibilities: Teachers and staff are expected to model behaviors consistent with Helix Schoolʼs core values, staff code of conduct and with policies and school performance standards. All staff are expected to support a successful learning environment in the following ways: ! Promote mutual respect between adults and students. ! Meet professional responsibilities associated with their positions. ! Develop and use cooperative discipline strategies and positive incentives for reinforcing positive behaviors. ! Promote a sense of pride and community by contributing to an open and friendly environment, by supporting celebrations, clubs and activities, by maintaining spirit building routines and traditions, and by promoting service in the school community. ! Establish and maintain strong home-to-school communication, including but not limited to prompt communication of any serious infraction of the code of conduct. DISCIPLINARY ACTION Level I Infractions: Level I Infractions to school rules are those infractions addressed by the teacher or staff member responsible for the student when the infraction occurs. The intent of corrective actions for Level I Infractions should be to help lead the student to making better choices. Level I Infractions include, but are not limited to: ! Uncooperative behavior ! Littering Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 127 of 195
  • 135. ! Abusive language ! Disrupting the learning environment ! Failure to follow the dress code ! Disruptions, talking and/ or running in the facility ! Put-downs and teasing ! Unexcused tardiness or absence ! Dishonesty Examples of consequences for Level I Infractions might include, but are not limited to: ! Required interaction with other school personnel ! Confiscation of property ! Restitution ! Detention Level II Infractions: Level II Infractions are those disciplinary infractions that are to be addressed by the principal, academy director, or principal designee, and which suspension or further disciplinary action by the principal is required or an option. Helix Schools adhere to local, state, and federal laws and requirements for breaches of conduct. Level II disciplinary infractions include, but are not limited to: ! Repeated, multiple or severe Level I infractions ! Refusal from a student to give his/her name to a teacher or other staff member ! Inappropriate sexual behavior ! Fighting or acts of violence ! Racial, religious, or ethnic slurs ! Failure to report to class ! Insubordination ! Verbal and/ or physical threats ! Vandalism ! Reckless endangerment of self and/ or others ! Possession, use, or sale of drugs, alcohol, or tobacco ! Leaving school grounds without permission ! Possession of stolen goods ! Possession of fireworks ! Failure to comply with a disciplinary assignment ! Arson, false alarms, and/ or bomb threats ! Extortion ! Gambling ! Forgery, plagiarism, and/ or cheating ! Sexual harassment, or other forms of harassment and/ or intimidation ! Any unlawful conduct ! Possession of weapons or ANY object intended to cause bodily harm ! Terrorist threats Consequences for Level II infractions may include but are not limited to the following: ! Out of school suspension ! Long term suspension ! Expulsion ! Contacting Police/ filing charges ! Board Hearing Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 128 of 195
  • 136. Any Level II infraction requires parental notification. Any incident that involves a breach of law requires police notification by the school. Some Level II Infractions are behaviors for which state or federal law mandates a specific consequence. Examples of such laws are the Safe and Drug Free Schools Act. Helix Schools, in accordance with these laws and its policy, mandates a minimum one-year expulsion and referral to the police for these infractions. Positive Reward System Helix strongly believes that the key to a successful school environment is praising and rewarding students for their hard work, effort, and success both behaviorally and academically. Each teacher and staff member is trained, encouraged, and reminded to constantly catch students behaving according to the Code of Conduct and working toward their potential. The following are some of the ways in which teachers and staff may reward students. ! Verbal Praise ! Positive notes on their assignments ! Phone calls home ! ʻCaught Being Goodʼ tickets ! Special class assignments or parties ! School-wide socials ! Free time ! Dinners, or one-on-one time with teachers or staff ! Extra privileges ! Lunch with the Academy Leader In addition, every classroom at the school uses the 100% Club as a pro-active disciplinary system. Students are rewarded for maintaining positive behavior choices throughout the school year with trips, celebrations, and other special activities determined by the house team. DRESS CODE The following information has been prepared to help acquaint students and parents with the rules and guidelines which are necessary for the high school to operate and function smoothly. It is the studentʼs responsibility to become familiar with the contents and to follow the rules as stated. All students must wear the school ID Card. The card must be worn on the front of the torso, either on a lanyard no longer than three inches above the waist or clipped or pinned to the garmentʼs collar, pocket or lapel. If a sweater or jacket is worn, the ID still must be visible on the front of the outer garment. Failure to adhere to these requirements will result in disciplinary actions at the discretion of the school principal. The dress of the students will be clean and modest, as detailed below. The following regulations will apply for both male and female students, unless otherwise specified, during school time, school dances, school-sponsored trips, and to and from school on school buses. Formal dances are the only exception to these rules. 1. Skirts, dresses, pants, jeans and walking shorts are acceptable, provided they have a finished hem or cuff. This eliminates any garment with visible ragged edges and bottoms that are not hemmed. All walking shorts, skorts, skirts, dresses, and culottes must be not more than four (4) inches above the knee. Holes in clothing above the knee are not allowed. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 129 of 195
  • 137. 2. The following garments are not acceptable: biking type shorts, spandex , tights (including tight fitting caprice pants), leggings, leotards, gym shorts, boxer shorts, sleep wear, soccer shorts, and sweat pants. 3. Clothing and/or jewelry advocating or advertising drugs, sex, alcohol, tobacco, profanity, illegal substances or activities, or questionable subject matter or imagery may not be worn. 4. Shirts and blouses for both male and female students must cover the top of the shoulder. Tank tops, muscle shirts, bare back dresses or tops, strapless dresses, camisoles, spaghetti strap dresses, off-the-shoulder apparel and other similar types are prohibited. 5. Necklines must be modest. See-through shirts, blouses, and pants are not permitted. Midriffs, halter tops, cropped shirts and other similar types are prohibited. Tops or bottoms allowing any mid-section skin to be seen are prohibited. 6. Underwear of any kind may not be worn as outerwear. These items include but are not limited to undershirts, long underwear, boxer shorts, etc. 7. All footwear must have soles and be well secured on the foot. Flip-flops, slippers, beach type thongs, etc. are prohibited. 8. Clothes are to be worn as designed. Clothes are not to be worn inside out or backwards. If necessary, a belt should be worn to prevent this from happening. 9. Headwear such as caps, hats, sweat bands, visors, and bandannas, etc. must not be worn in any building on campus. Exception: Religious headwear may be worn when approved by the administration. 10. Sunglasses may not be worn in any building on campus. 11. Large chains may not be worn in any building on campus. LANGUAGE Appropriate language from all members of the school community is mandatory to maintain a positive and professional learning environment. In order to foster respect and dignity of all persons at the school, obscene and profane language will not be tolerated. Students who use inappropriate language, as determined by any teacher, staff member, or administrator, will be referred to the academy leader. A call will be made to the parent/guardian and the student will report his/her action to the parent/guardian. Repeat violations by the student will lead to other disciplinary action. Any derogatory language directed at a staff member or student will result in the student being suspended. FOOD AND DRINKS Students are expected to keep their building clean by eating in the cafeteria area. Students are expected to take unopened food and drinks directly to their lockers until lunch period. FIGHTING Students who choose to fight at school or at school activities are an unnecessary and unwanted disruption. In cases involving student fights, the students will be suspended and charges may be filed with the East Baton Rouge Sheriffʼs Office. A student involved in fighting at school for a second time in the course of the school year will be suspended, charges will be filed, and expulsion may be recommended. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 130 of 195
  • 138. WEAPONS Possession and/or use of a weapon by a student is detrimental to the welfare and safety of students and school personnel. Possessing any weapon or facsimile in any school building, or on school grounds, is expressly forbidden and will result in immediate referral to the Helixʼs Executive Director and Board of Directors for expulsion. Such weapons include but are not limited to any knife, razor, ice pick, explosive smoke bomb, incendiary device, gun (including pellet gun), slingshot, bludgeon, brass knuckles or artificial knuckles of any kind, or any object that can reasonably be considered a weapon or dangerous instrument. USE AND/OR POSSESSION OF DRUGS AND/OR ALCOHOL AND DRUG PARAPHERNALIA Possession or distribution of alcohol or drugs or facsimile is in violation of state law and Helixʼs policy and will be dealt with in the following manner: Use or possession of alcohol or other drugs/drug paraphernalia ! First offense: Suspension of ten (10) days ! Second offense: Suspension and recommendation for expulsion Distribution of alcohol or drugs ! Immediate referral to the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriffʼs office for appropriate action. ! Suspension from school pending recommendation for expulsion SMOKING AND TOBACCO Smoking is prohibited on school property, including buildings, grounds (outdoors and off campus school activities), and buses. Possession or use of tobacco products on school grounds is in violation of the Louisiana Smoke-Free Air Act. Students violating this policy will receive a disciplinary referral and be disciplined appropriately as determined by the academy leader. Any further offense will result in more severe consequences. GANG POLICY Helix has a ZERO TOLERANCE policy for gang-like or intimidating behavior. Helix specifically finds that any gang-related activity, including use of graffiti, disrupts and interferes with school programs and obstructs the lawful mission, processes, procedures, and functions of the school. Students suspected of gang related activity will be referred to the East Baton Rouge Sheriffʼs office for investigation and appropriate action. HABITUALLY DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR A habitually disruptive student means a student who has been suspended three times during the course of a school year for causing a material and substantial disruption in the classroom, on school grounds, on school vehicles, or at school activities or events, because of behavior that was initiated, willful, and overt on the part of the student. No student will be declared habitually disruptive prior to the development of a Remedial Discipline Plan. Remedial Discipline Plan: This plan shall address the studentʼs disruptive behavior, educational needs and goals, and strategies for keeping the student in school. The Remedial Discipline Plan shall be developed after the second suspension for a material and substantial disruption. A conference will be held to notify the student and the parent(s) or guardian(s) of the status of the student. For the purpose of this section the following offenses will be considered major infractions of the school disciplinary code: possession of/use of, or Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 131 of 195
  • 139. distribution of alcohol or other illegal substances/paraphernalia, smoking, fighting, obscene language directed at teachers or school employees, insubordination, truancy, fighting, assault, gang related activity, use of improper language, theft, vandalism, intimidation and bus infractions. SEXUAL HARASSMENT It is a violation of policy for any student or member of the staff to harass another student or staff member through conduct or communications of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment may include, but is not limited to, unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, sex-oriented verbal “kidding,” repeated remarks with sexual or demeaning implications, unwelcome touching, patting, pinching, or deliberate brushing against anotherʼs body. Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination, which violates Section 703 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It is the policy of the school to maintain a learning and working environment free from sexual harassment. Helix prohibits any form of sexual harassment. It shall be a violation of this policy for any student or employee of a Helix school to harass a student or employee through conduct or communication of a sexual nature as defined by this policy. Helix will act to investigate all complaints and to discipline any student or employee of the school. HARASSMENT POLICY Harassment of any type has no place in the school setting. Helix will endeavor to maintain a learning and working environment free from harassment. Helix expects administrators and supervisors to make it clear to students and staff that harassment in the school building, on school grounds, or at school-sponsored functions will not be tolerated and will be grounds for disciplinary action up to and including suspension or expulsion for students and termination of employment for employees. Harassment may include but is not limited to sexual harassment, racial harassment, or harassment because of a physical condition or disability. It may also include but is not limited to hostile, demeaning, or intimidating behavior or conversation. FACILITIES BEHAVIOR Students are expected to conduct themselves in a respectful and civilized manner while moving between classes and at any other time they are in the facilities. Students will walk and be appropriately courteous if they inadvertently bump into another student. Public displays of affection are unacceptable and may result in disciplinary action. Obscene and profane language will not be tolerated. BUS DISCIPLINE POLICY Students are expected to follow all safety rules while riding the bus, at the risk of suspension from bus transportation. It is important to remember that any time the driver must remove his/her eyes from the road to address those students who are breaking the rules; the entire bus is placed in jeopardy. Therefore we expect the students to: ! Remain in their seats, feet and body facing forward, ! Talk in quiet voices, ! Obey the bus driver, ! Speak with respectful voices and language, ! Keep feet out of the aisles, Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 132 of 195
  • 140. ! Refrain from eating or drinking on the bus, and ! Keep hands to themselves and inside the bus. If any student should choose not to follow the rules, s/he risks being referred for disciplinary action by the bus driver. The first write-up will result in a warning. Subsequent referrals for bus infractions will result in the following: ! 2ndreferral – 1 day bus suspension ! 3rd referral – 3 day bus suspension ! 4th referral – 5 day bus suspension ! 5th referral – 10 day bus suspension and referral to the Executive Director and Board of Directors for removal of bus privileges for the remainder of the year. Suspension from School Transportation: As the result of misconduct occurring on a bus or other student transportation, and after notice to the student and his or her parent(s) or guardian(s), a student may be suspended from school transportation. When such action amounts to a suspension from attending school because of the distance between home and school and the unavailability of alternative public or private transportation, the school will make appropriate arrangements for the studentʼs education. VANDALISM Vandalism is not tolerated, and appropriate disciplinary action will be assigned for any violation of this rule. Vandalism includes, but is not limited to graffiti, destruction of school equipment or property, and damage to books. Parents/guardians of student vandals will be financially responsible for all damages. SUSPENSIONS Suspension is a serious consequence for a serious offense, such as drug/alcohol related offenses, or possession of weapons and incendiary devices. Students may be suspended for a period of one to ten days, depending on the severity of the offense. Parents will be notified in writing or by phone when a suspension occurs. Students under suspension will not be permitted to come on school grounds, to attend school activities (including weekend events), or to use any district transportation for the duration of the suspension. EXPULSION Expulsion is reserved for the most serious offenses and can exclude the student from school and school activities for any period up to one calendar year. PROVISION OF SERVICES DURING REMOVAL The school will ensure that alternative educational services are provided to a student who has been suspended or removed, to help that student progress in the schoolʼs general curriculum. For a student who has been suspended, alternative instruction will be provided to the extent provided by law and as consistent with the practice of the surrounding school districts during the period of suspension; for a student who has been expelled, alternative instruction will be provided in like manner as a suspended student until the student enrolls in another school or until the end of the school year, whichever comes first. Alternative instruction will be provided to students suspended or expelled in a way that best suits the needs of the student and the school on a case-by-case basis. Instruction for such students shall be sufficient to enable the student to make adequate academic progress, and shall provide them the opportunity to complete the assignments, learn the curriculum and participate in assessments. Instruction will take place in one of the following locations: the Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 133 of 195
  • 141. studentʼs home, a contracted facility (e.g., in the school district of location), or a suspension room at the school. Instruction will be provided by one or more of the following individuals in consultation with the studentʼs teacher(s): teacher aides or trained volunteers, individuals within a contracted facility, a tutor hired for this purpose. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 134 of 195
  • 142. Helix Schools Job Descriptions Executive Director Purpose: ! To improve communication and student achievement by promoting parent and community involvement in the education process ! To serve as a liaison to engage relevant industry involvement with schools ! To provide support to schools leadership to ensure an efficient and effective work environment ! To serve as a spokesperson for the school in the community and elsewhere Essential Functions: ! Communicate and reach out to parents/community/industry leaders on behalf of the school to develop ongoing partnerships with the school and overcome any language, social, or cultural barriers ! Coordinate with parent/community/industry leaders and organizations to build resources, expand programs, and develop new opportunities for the school ! Articulate the schoolʼs mission to the community and solicit support in accomplishing the mission ! Participate on a variety of local committees/boards (e.g. Baton Rouge Area Chamber, Rotary Club of Baton Rouge, etc.) for the purpose of receiving and/or conveying information to promote parent, industry, and community involvement in the educational process ! Maintain a database of community/industry contacts and volunteers for the purpose of documenting and/or providing reliable information ! Organize various activities (e.g. presentations to partners, community forums, volunteer opportunities, etc.) to promote school support, showcasing studentsʼ talents and abilities and celebrating the diversity of the community. ! Recruit parent and community volunteers to assist with school activities ! Oversee contracting entities and business operations ! Report directly to the Board of Directors ! Directly supervise principal Requirements: ! Masterʼs degree is required; Ph.D. is preferred ! Five years of leadership experience in both industry and traditional education settings ! Personal initiative and desire for responsibility ! Strong communication skills ability to work collaboratively with teachers/staff ! Leadership capacity Terms of Employment: Employment of this position is conditioned upon satisfactory completion of criminal background and criminal history check. The Executive Director is employed under a year-to- year employment contract that describes the terms and conditions of their employment. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 135 of 195
  • 143. Principal Purpose: ! To provide the instructional, operational, and administrative leadership necessary to ensure the academic and operational success of the school ! To manage policies, regulations, and procedures to ensure that all students are supervised in a safe learning environment that reflects the approved curriculum and mission of the school Essential Functions: ! Demonstrate professional, ethical, and responsible behavior, and serve as a role model for all school staff ! Articulate the schoolʼs mission and solicit parent, student, and faculty support to ensure that the school culture reflects this mission ! Collaborate with the Executive Director in planning and implementing programs, including onsite community engagement programs ! Ensure a safe and orderly environment ! Recruit, select, and hire school staff, including teachers and school-based support staff ! Define expectations for staff performance with regard to instructional strategies, classroom management, and communication with families ! Continually monitor and record progress of school and staff performance ! Create, supervise, and evaluate an effective team of people jointly responsible for the attainment of school goals and committed to achieving excellence ! Provide instructional leadership in advancing proven teaching and learning practices ! Ensure that continuous academic achievement is guided by academic standards and concrete data from state and local assessments ! Ensure that continuous improvement processes address the achievement of all students ! Ensure compliance with all laws, board policies, and civil regulations ! Directly supervise the Director of Achievement, faculty, and school support staff Requirements: ! Masterʼs degree required; Ph.D. preferred ! Five years of Leadership experience in industry or education ! Certified (or certifiable) as a school principal is preferred ! Personal initiative and desire for responsibility ! Strong communication skills ability to work collaboratively with teachers/staff ! Leadership capacity Terms of Employment: Employment of this position is conditioned upon satisfactory completion of criminal background and criminal history check. Principals are employed under a year-to-year employment contract that describes the terms and conditions of their employment. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 136 of 195
  • 144. Director of Achievement Purpose: ! To provide the instructional and curricular leadership necessary to ensure the success of the school, under the supervision of the Principal. ! To establish an instructional vision and a focused plan for improving student achievement, monitoring, supervising, and evaluating faculty, supporting faculty and staff in professional development to improve student achievement, creating a community of continuous learning for all faculty/staff and students, and fostering a culture of high expectations for all students. Essential Functions: ! Manage implementation of the Louisiana Core Curriculum and Grade Level Expectations ! Ensure accurate implementation of the Louisiana Statewide Assessment Standards and Practices ! Develop a year-long professional development plan to ensure effective instructional practices ! Mentor and coach teachers, with significant emphasis on new and novice teachers by demonstrating effective instructional and classroom management techniques ! Provide training and guidance to teachers to develop individual student learning goals aligned with the established student performance targets for the school ! Facilitate analysis of all student achievement data to inform instructional planning and delivery ! Provide ongoing professional development for teachers based on analysis of student achievement data and teacher observation ! Manage the development of all academic support services, including tutoring and enrichment programs ! Assist with special education and English as a Second Language programs to ensure the schoolʼs compliance with all state and federal regulations ! Ensure a safe and orderly environment ! Provide instructional leadership in advancing proven teaching and learning practices ! Ensure that continuous improvement processes address the achievement of all students ! Manage teaching teams and establish a culture of professionalism among team members ! Lead, coordinate, and support the implementation of peer coaching ! Lead and support the development of professional growth plans Requirements: ! Masterʼs degree required; Ph.D. or Ed.D preferred ! Educational leadership experience ! Personal initiative and desire for responsibility ! Strong communication skills ability to work collaboratively with teachers/staff ! Leadership capacity Terms of Employment: Employment of this position is conditioned upon satisfactory completion of criminal background and criminal history check. The Director of Achievement is employed under a year-to-year employment contract that describes the terms and conditions of their employment. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 137 of 195
  • 145. Teacher Purpose: ! To communicate knowledge and facilitate student learning in an engaging, stimulating, and effective manner ! To utilize a variety of instructional methods and curriculum resources to present material to students ! To share common planning, professional development, curriculum design, and teaching responsibilities with other members of the core teaching team ! To administer various forms of student assessments, communicate with parents and team members about student progress, and plan for further instruction ! To integrate data-driven decision making into teaching and professional activities Essential Functions: ! Model professional and ethical behavior when dealing with students, parents, peers, and community ! Develop and maintain a safe and orderly learning environment ! Possess and demonstrate expertise in subject area while participating in team teaching to integrate coursework through project-based learning ! Demonstrate gains in student performance ! Develop positive and meaningful relationships with students ! Adhere to all school record-keeping expectations ! Facilitate high quality instruction to students ! Implement school policies and procedures ! Maintain ongoing communication with families, faculty/staff, and community ! Collaborate with core team on curriculum in order to meet the needs of all students ! Integrate technology as a learning tool for students ! Take a leadership role in at least one school-level committee or activity ! Demonstrate professional, ethical, and responsible behavior, and serve as a role model for all students Requirements: ! Bachelorʼs degree minimum, preferably in subject area ! Experience in an industry related to subject area preferred ! Louisiana teacher certification preferred; noncertified applicants should be willing to seek certification ! Personal initiative and desire for responsibility ! Strong communication skills ability to work collaboratively with teachers/staff ! Leadership capacity Terms of Employment: Employment of this position is conditioned upon satisfactory completion of criminal background and criminal history check. Teachers are at-will 11 month employees; benefits associated with this position are described in the employee handbook. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 138 of 195
  • 146. Special Education Teacher Purpose: ! To exhibit the same skills, knowledge, and qualities required of the general classroom teachers in the areas of curriculum, instruction, assessment, classroom management, professional responsibilities, professional relationships, family involvement, and school community Essential Functions (in addition to those of general classroom teachers): ! Perform educational assessment of special education students, including an observation of each student requiring special education, review of the studentʼs educational history, conferences with the studentʼs teachers, and an evaluation and analysis of the studentʼs academic performance and learning characteristics ! Report educational assessment findings as appropriate ! Actively participate in the deliberations and classification of educationally disabled students and assist in the planning of Individual Educational Programs (IEP) ! Act as a liaison with the classroom teacher(s) for the purpose of ensuring the implementation of the established IEP of an assigned student ! Assist in coordinating, developing, monitoring, and evaluating the effectiveness of the IEP ! Assist in the identification of all types of exceptional students within the school ! Maintain confidential records on all referred students and student/parent contacts in accordance with federal and state law, Board policy, and the procedure of the Districtʼs special education program ! Assess student readiness for entry in the school program in accordance with policies established by the Board of Education ! Provide thorough and timely reports, data, and information as requested ! Serve as a resource and/or consultant to school personnel on the nature, causes, and topics relating to student learning Requirements: ! Masterʼs degree in Education ! Louisiana certification in Special Education preferred; noncertified applicants should be willing to seek certification Experience working with students with disabilities ! Personal initiative and desire for responsibility ! Strong communication skills ability to work collaboratively with teachers/staff ! Leadership capacity Terms of Employment: Employment of this position is conditioned upon satisfactory completion of criminal background and criminal history check. Special Education Teachers are at-will 11-month employees; benefits associated with this position are described in the employee handbook. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 139 of 195
  • 147. Social Worker Purpose: ! To promote and enhance the overall academic mission by providing services that strengthen home, school, and community partnerships and alleviate barriers to learning ! To determine the needs and interests of students and present options for development both outside of school and within the school program to maximize the likelihood that students will achieve long-term goals and reach their maximum potential Essential Functions: ! Effectively and appropriately assess and address the needs, characteristics, and interactions of students, families, and community ! Use knowledge and understanding of the reciprocal influences of home, school, and community to intervene for student success via such practices as assessment, crisis intervention, home visits, conflict resolution, individual and group counseling, consultation, program development, dropout prevention, and coordination of school and community services ! Advocate for appropriate services for students and their families ! Consult and collaborate with stakeholders on behalf of students and their families ! Effectively plan, implement, and evaluate programs that promote student and family success ! Use assessment and evaluation results to develop appropriate interventions for students, families, schools and communities ! Develop long-term and short-term intervention plans consistent with curriculum, with studentsʼ needs, strengths, diversity and life experiences, and with other social and emotional factors ! Provide services to students in ways that build upon individual strengths and offer students maximum opportunities to participate in the planning and direction of their own learning experience. ! Provide appropriate follow-up to ensure that studentsʼ needs are being met ! Act as a point of contact for outside organizations working with students and their families Requirements: ! Master Level Licensed Social Worker ! 5 years clinical experience ! Personal initiative and desire for responsibility ! Strong communication skills ability to work collaboratively with teachers/staff ! Leadership capacity ! Familiarity with the local community Terms of Employment: Employment of this position is conditioned upon satisfactory completion of criminal background and criminal history check. Social Workers are at-will 11-month employees; benefits associated with this position are described in the employee handbook. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 140 of 195
  • 148. Data Manager Purpose: ! To oversee student, strategic, and operational data collection systems ! To produce clear, concise, and accurate information reports to support the leadership team in improving school performance Essential Functions: ! Manage and establish all aspects of student information tracking for the school ! Maintain school operations records, including school schedule, student waitlist attendance records, and school calendar ! Responsible for recording, tracking and following up on student tardiness, excused absences, and unexcused absences, and for providing this information to school leadership as requested ! Write reports (word processing and spreadsheets using FileMaker Pro and MS Excel) ! Advise and assist school leaders in target setting and detailed analysis of school performance ! Train faculty/staff and school leaders on procedures for data collection, interpreting results and findings, and using/ understanding data and target setting ! Create and prepare complex student, strategic, and operational data analysis for school leaders, ensuring that "non data specialists" can translate data results in the classroom to impact student achievement Requirements: ! Associateʼs degree is required; Bachelorʼs degree preferred ! At least three years experience in an office environment ! Master skills in Microsoft Office and other data collection software Keen attention to detail and strong organizational, clerical and computational skills ! Proficient in student management software (such as JPAMMS or eSchools Plus), business correspondence, and procedures manuals Terms of Employment: Employment of this position is conditioned upon satisfactory completion of criminal background and criminal history check. Data Managers are at-will 12-month employees; benefits associated with this position are described in the employee handbook. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 141 of 195
  • 149. Administrative Support Purpose: ! To serve as an information manager, arrange and schedule meetings or appointments for school leaders, organize and preserve paper and computer files, coordinate school leadersʼ projects, handle travel arrangements, perform research, and distribute information via telephone, mail, and e-mail Essential Functions: ! Create and maintain a welcoming and efficient front office that emphasizes organization, professionalism, courtesy, flexibility, and teamwork ! Greet and announce all school visitors appropriately ! Use proper telephone etiquette and direct calls to appropriate school staff ! Provide needed assistance and communicate effectively with principal and all school staff ! Be attentive, patient and fair with students ! Treat parents as valued and respected customers ! Responsible for recording, tracking and following up on student tardiness, excused absences, and unexcused absences, and for providing this information to school leadership as required ! Provide and/or manage standard school operations, including, but not limited to student entrance/exit procedures and correspondence and schedule for the principal ! Requirements: ! High school diploma or equivalent is required; Associateʼs degree preferred ! Familiarity with office equipment such as computers, fax machines, calculators, and photocopiers ! Microsoft Office and Adobe Acrobat software proficiency ! At least three years of experience in office management or in a secretarial position Terms of Employment: Employment of this position is conditioned upon satisfactory completion of criminal background and criminal history check. The School Secretary is an at-will 12-month employee; benefits associated with this position are outlined in the employee handbook. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 142 of 195
  • 150. Technical Support Purpose: ! To assist students, faculty/staff, or school leaders with troubleshooting, diagnosis, setup, installation of electronic hardware and software, maintenance and repair of technological equipment including computers, networking components and related peripherals ! To record and order school electronic hardware or software inventory Essential Functions: ! Manage all technological inventory regularly by recording existing and damaged/lost technological equipment, creating purchase orders for new hardware/software equipment, and maintaining proper inventory documentation for each fiscal year ! Coordinate, monitor, and maintain electronic and physical work order system to ensure the timely completion of maintenance and operations work with minimal disruption to the school ! Identify repair needs for the purpose of prioritizing work assignments to minimize damage and/or disruption of services ! Inform the Principal of the status of work orders as requested ! Maintain manual and electronic documents, files, and records (e.g. work orders, equipment repair orders, inventory data, etc.) for the purpose of providing an up-to-date reference and audit trail for compliance ! Perform record-keeping and program-specific clerical functions (e.g. copying, faxing, filing, etc.) for the purpose of documenting activities, providing written reference, and/or conveying information ! Research discrepancies in financial information for the purpose of reconciling purchase orders with invoices ! Respond to inquiries from staff, vendors, etc. for the purpose of resolving maintenance issues and minimizing the disruption of services Requirements: ! Bachelorʼs Degree is required, preferably in one of the following areas: business information technology, business systems engineering, computer networking and hardware, computer science, computer software development, information technology, or software engineering ! Knowledge of hardware, software, and operating systems ! Listening and questioning skills combined with the ability to interact confidently with clients to determine the problem and explain the solution ! Ability to prioritize the workload Terms of Employment: Employment of this position is conditioned upon satisfactory completion of criminal background and criminal history check. The School Secretary is an at will 12 month employee; benefits associated with this position are outlined in the employee handbook. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 143 of 195
  • 151. Appendix: Facilities Information The memos in this appendix serve as letters of intent to provide evidence that the proposed facility can be secured. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 144 of 195
  • 152. Helix Network of Educational Choices EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN TEMPLATE NOTE: The relevant contact information and site plans will be inserted when the school has been approved, staff has been hired, and Helix has full access to the facility. I. TABLE OF CONTENTS 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS……………………………. II. INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION…………………………….. 4 APPROVAL STATEMENT………………….. 6 III. BASIC PLAN SITUATION AND ASSUMPTIONS……………….. 7 COMMUNICATIONS……………………………….. 7 ! EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS……….. 7 ! MEDIA RELATIONS…………………………. 7 ! EMERGENCY CONTACT NUMBERS…….. 8 SITE ASSIGNMENTS AND STAGING AREAS…. 9 A.ICS ASSIGNMENTS…………………………. 10 EVACUATION CHECKLIST……………………….. 11 LOCKDOWN/SHELTER IN PLACE………………. 12 REVERSE EVACUATION…………………………. 13 SCHOOL MAPS…………………………………….. 14 ! RESOURCE INVENTORY…………………... 15 Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 149 of 195
  • 153. IV. PROCEDURES ! ANIMALS………………………………………. 16 ! ASSAULT/FIGHTS…………………………… 17 ! BOMB THREAT………………………………. 18 ! BUS INCIDENT……………………………….. 19 ! FIRE……………………………………………. 20 ! GAS LEAK…………………………………….. 21 ! GENERAL EMERGENCY…………………… 22 ! HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EVENT………... 23 ! INTRUDER/HOSTAGE………………………. 24 ! MEDIA………………………………………….. 25 ! RADIOLOGICAL EVENTS…………………... 26 ! SERIOUS INJURY/DEATH………………….. 27 ! SHELTERING PROCEDURES……………... 28 ! STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES………………… 29 ! STUDENT UNREST…………………………. 30 ! SUICIDE………………………………………. 31 ! TERRORIST EVENT………………………… 32 ! WEAPONS……………………………………. 33 ! WEATHER…………………………………….. 34 V. APPENDICES A.BOMB THREAT CHECKLIST………………. 35 B.FIRST AID…………………………………….. 36 C.MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST... 37 D.PANDEMIC PREPAREDNESS……..………. 40 E.PUBLIC INFORMATION RELEASE………... 44 F.SCHOOL-PARENT LETTER………………... 45 G.SEARCH AND RESCUE TEAMS…………... 47 H.SITE STATUS REPORT…………………….. 48 I.STAFF SKILLS SURVEY……………………. 49 J.STUDENT ACCOUNTING FORM………….. 50 K.STUDENT RELEASE FORM……………….. 51 L.UPDATE REPORT…………………………… 52 Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 150 of 195
  • 154. M.STUDENT ROSTER…………………………. 53 N.MASTER SCHEDULE……………………….. 54 O.FACULTY AND STAFF ROSTER………….. 55 P.INCIDENT RESPONSE JOB DESCRIPTIONS 56 Q.EMERGENCY RESPONSE DRILL LOG….. 78 R.ANNUAL SITE PLAN REVIEW 79 Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 151 of 195
  • 155. ! INTRODUCTION What is an Emergency? ! A duly proclaimed existence of conditions of disaster or extreme peril to the safety of persons or property caused by air pollution, fire, flood or floodwater, storm, epidemic, riot, earthquake, intruder, or other causes. This may be beyond the control of the services, personnel, equipment, and facilities of the site and/or may require the combined efforts of the State or other political subdivisions. School facilities must be prepared to respond to an emergency or traumatic event in an organized and timely manner so that students and staff can continue to function effectively without additional trauma or the development of additional emergencies. ! School emergencies can be small and easily managed, or they can be large and difficult to manage. Every school emergency must be managed in a way that ensures the safety of everyone involved. In order to provide a safe and secure teaching and learning environment, personnel must plan for the management of emergency events that cannot be predicted or prevented. This plan is designed to help you do that. Purpose: ! To effectively handle an emergency, a comprehensive Emergency Operations Site Plan must be developed and an Emergency Response Team must be organized before an emergency occurs. Our schoolʼs Emergency Operations Plan must be organized and all staff members trained in order to prepare effectively for maximum safety, efficiency and communication in the event of an emergency. ! The Incident Command System (ICS) will be used to manage all emergencies that occur within the school. We encourage the use of ICS to perform non-emergency tasks to promote familiarity with the system. All school and site personnel will complete mandatory Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 152 of 195
  • 156. training. ! Students and parents must also understand that contingency preparation and procedures are necessary and are conducted for their safety and well-being. An overview of the plan will be explained and distributed to parents. ! Planning, preparation, and training will help staff personnel learn the proper course of action in an emergency. This manual will provide step-by-step guidelines to help deal with emergencies that may occur. This manual cannot foresee all possible circumstances of an emergency. Staff must be prepared to evaluate all the circumstances and make sound judgments based on the situation. Staff will receive annual training in the emergency response plan. ! A committee will be established consisting of local law enforcement, fire/EMS, emergency management, county health department, and site personnel to develop the Emergency Operations Plan. The committee should consist of site staff from the following disciplines at a minimum: Administrator (Principal or Assistant) Food Service staff Office staff Monitor/Safety personnel Maintenance Teacher ! Procedures will be developed to provide for disabled and non-English speaking students and staff. ! This plan shall be reviewed annually by the above committee and updated to maintain current procedures. ! Drills will be conducted periodically to test the effectiveness of the plan. A debriefing shall be conducted after each drill to receive feedback from all participants on the effectiveness of the plan. Identified weaknesses will be addressed to strengthen the plan. ! Each classroom will be supplied with a Classroom Emergency Response Guide that provides instructions on how to respond to specific events as determined by site emergency planning committee. ! An NOAA capable radio with battery power back-up will be placed in the office where it can be monitored for emergency messages during school hours. ! Provisions for off-campus emergencies will also be addressed in this plan (e.g. bus accidents, field trips, off campus school activities, etc.). ! A copy of this plan will be filed with the school office. During a Disaster: Step by Step is Right Here The greatest mistakes principals, teachers, and staff make in crisis situations come from not knowing what steps to take and in what order to take them in a given situation. Planning, training, and drills will help prevent those mistakes. In a crisis it helps to know where to turn Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 153 of 195
  • 157. for help. This manual provides specific, sequential steps to take. These steps are guidelines to inform you of the most likely steps to take. It is critical to evaluate the circumstances of the actual event and determine the most appropriate course of action. Some common incidents have been addressed to help you in an emergency. Each site must conduct a hazard assessment to identify all hazards that pose a risk to the school. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 154 of 195
  • 158. Approval Statement The School Safety Plan for the Baton Rouge Regional STEM Academy has been reviewed and found to comply with the Emergency Response Plan, minimum and/or recommended requirements. Site Administrator (required) Date Helix Board of Directors Date Representative (required) Law Enforcement Date Fire/EMS Date (recommended) (recommended) Local Emergency Management Date Parish Health Department Date (recommended) (recommended) Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 155 of 195
  • 159. ! BASIC PLAN ! SITUATION AND ASSUMPTIONS 1. Situation ! The school sits on (insert acreage) at (insert address). The site consists of (insert # of buildings) buildings. There is an Average Daily Membership of (insert ADM) students and (insert # of staff members) staff members. (address scheduled daily differences in population) ! The principal has the primary responsibility for developing and implementing the site Emergency Operations Plan. The principal has the responsibility of executing the policies developed by Helix. ! Site personnel and/or local fire and law enforcement agencies handle most emergencies on site. 2. Assumptions a. During an emergency, centralized direction and control (i.e., activation of the Command Post) is the most effective approach to management of emergency operations. b. In case of an emergency that is beyond the capabilities of the site to handle, site personnel will coordinate with local emergency response agencies. This may include having a member or members act as liaison with responding agencies. ! COMMUNICATIONS ! Emergency Communications When an emergency condition exists, the Incident Commander will notify the necessary personnel to respond to their area of assignment. The methods of communication, listed below in descending order, will be used (a being the primary mode of communication, followed by alternative modes). Notifications will be given in plain language. Code words shall not be used. ! Intercom ! Two-way radios ! Telephone ! Runners ! Media Relations The site Information Officer will be prepared to deal with the media. A separate staging location will be pre-identified for media briefings. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 156 of 195
  • 160. ! Emergency Contact Numbers Public Safety Agencies Number General Emergency 9-911* Police/Sheriff/Fire 9-911* Poison Control 1-800-362-0101 Local Hospital Helix Contacts Number Founder, Board of Directors School Safety Transportation Operations Food Services Health Services * Determine the appropriate sequence required to dial 911 from your sites phone system. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 157 of 195
  • 161. ! SITE ASSIGNMENTS AND STAGING AREAS On Site Locations and Staging Areas Primary Alternate Alternate On Site Command Post Student Care First Aid Student Request Student Release Media Staging Law Enforcement Staging Fire Staging Public Works Staging Utilities Staging Student Relocation Center Helix Staging Primary Alternate Alternate Off Site Command Post Student Care First Aid Student Request Student Release Media Staging Law Enforcement Staging Fire Staging Public Works Staging Utilities Staging Student Relocation Center Helix Staging Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 158 of 195
  • 162. ! ICS ASSIGNMENTS 1ST (Primary) 2ND(Alt) 3rd (Alt) POSITION Incident Commander Safety Liaison Information Officer Operations Communications Recorder Security Search & Rescue Safety/Damage Medical/First Aid Student Supervision Student Request Student Release Runners Notes: Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 159 of 195
  • 163. ! EVACUATION CHECKLIST ! Evacuation ! Incident Commander (IC) initiates evacuation procedures. ! IC determines if students and staff should be evacuated outside of building or to ________________________ relocation center. IC contacts (Transportation Coordinator) and informs him/her that the evacuation is taking place. ! IC notifies relocation center. ! IC directs students and staff to follow evacuation drill procedures and route. Follow alternate route if normal route is too dangerous. ! IC closes all windows. ! IC turns off lights, electrical equipment, gas, water faucets, air conditioning and heating system. ! IC describes how disabled and non-English speaking students and staff will be provided for. ! IC locks doors. ! Teachers: Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 160 of 195
  • 164. Direct students to follow normal evacuation drill procedures unless IC alters route. ! Take classroom roster and emergency kit. ! Close classroom doors and turn out lights. ! When outside building, account for all students. Inform principal or Incident Commander immediately of missing student(s). ! If students are evacuated, stay with class unless relieved by buddy teacher. Take roll again when you arrive at the relocation center. ! Relocation Centers List primary and secondary student relocation centers: Primary Relocation Center Secondary Relocation Center _________________________________ ___________________________________ Address/Phone No.: Address/Phone No.: _________________________________ ___________________________________ Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 161 of 195
  • 165. ! LOCKDOWN/SHELTER-IN-PLACE Lock-down procedures may be issued in situations involving dangerous intruders or other incidents that may result in harm to persons inside school building. ! Incident Commander (IC) will issue lock-down order by announcing a warning over PA system, sending a messenger to each classroom, or other alternate method. ! IC directs all students, staff, and visitors into classrooms or secure rooms. ! IC locks classroom doors. ! IC covers windows of classrooms. ! IC moves all persons away from windows and doors. ! IC directs all persons to get down on the floor. ! IC allows no one outside of classrooms until the Incident Commander gives the all- clear signal. *Consider using a duress code to authenticate any all-clear signal* (This is a specific word or phrase that is used prior to giving the all-clear signal that indicates to all staff that the person signaling the all-clear is not being forced to do so by an intruder) Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 162 of 195 Lock-Down Procedures
  • 166. ! REVERSE EVACUATION Reverse Evacuation/Shelter-in-place provides refuge for students, staff, and public within school buildings during an emergency. Shelters are located in areas that maximize the safety of inhabitants. Safe areas may change depending on the emergency. Be prepared to go into lockdown/shelter-in-place once inside. ! Identify safe areas in each school building. ! Incident Commander warns students and staff to assemble in safe areas. Bring all persons inside building(s). ! Teachers take class roster. ! Close all exterior doors and windows. ! Turn off any ventilation leading outdoors. ! Cover up food not in containers or put it in the refrigerator. ! If advised, cover mouth and nose with handkerchief, cloth, paper towels, or tissues. ! Teachers should account for all students after arriving in the safe area. ! Office personnel must contact each teacher/classroom for a headcount. ! All persons must remain in safe areas until notified by Incident Commander or emergency responders. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 163 of 195 Sheltering Procedures
  • 167. ! SCHOOL MAPS -INSERT MAPS OF SCHOOL AND SURROUNDING AREA- AT MINIMUM INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE MAP: (Primary and Alternate evacuation route maps shall be placed in each room) ! Primary evacuation routes ! Alternate evacuation routes ! Handicap evacuation areas ! Utility access/shut-off for ! Gas ! Water ! Electricity ! HVAC System ! Telephone system ! Site assignments and Staging Areas identified on page 9 ! Haz Mat storage areas ! Heat plants/boilers ! Room numbers ! Door/window locations ! Any other information deemed appropriate by your planning committee NOTE: It is recommended that you develop a diagram of the entire school site and surrounding area and identify the locations and staging areas from page 9 on the diagram. In an emergency a diagram may be easier to read than blueprints. Consult with local first responder agencies on what type of maps or diagrams they prefer. Blueprints of the site should be available in addition to the map or diagram. Blueprints may be necessary in certain fire or law enforcement situations. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 164 of 195
  • 168. ! RESOURCE INVENTORY -INSERT RESOURCE INVENTORY OF EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT- INCLUDE: ! Communications equipment ! First aid supplies ! Fire fighting equipment ! Lighting ! Classroom emergency kits ! Food ! Water ! Blankets ! Maintenance supplies IDENTIFY ANY AND ALL AVAILABLE RESOURCES THAT MAY BE USED OR MAY BE ! Tools NEEDED IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 165 of 195
  • 169. ANIMALS " Ensure the safety of students and staff first. " Call 9-911, if necessary. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) " Notify CPR/first aid certified persons in school building of medical emergencies (names of CPR/first aid certified persons are listed in Disaster Team Members section). " Notify Incident Commander. Incident Commander assembles Disaster Team Members. " Seal off area if animal(s) still present. " Incident Commander notifies Board of Directors Founder, Executive Director, and parents of students involved. " Assess counseling needs of victim(s) or witness(s). Implement post-crisis procedures. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 166 of 195
  • 170. ASSAULT/FIGHTS " Ensure the safety of students and staff first. " Call 9-911, if necessary. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) " Notify CPR/first aid certified persons in school building of medical emergencies (names of CPR/first aid certified persons are listed in Crisis Team Members section). " Notify Incident Commander. Incident Commander assembles Crisis Team Members. " Seal off area where assault took place. " Defuse situation, if possible. " Incident Commander notifies police if weapon was used, victim has physical injury causing substantial pain or impairment of physical condition, or assault involved sexual contact (intentional touching of anus, breast, buttocks or genitalia of another person in a sexual manner without consent. This includes touching of those areas covered by clothing). " Incident Commander notifies Board of Directors Founder, Executive Director, and parents of students involved in assault. " Document all activities. Ask victim(s)/witness(es) for their accounts of incident. " Assess counseling needs of victim(s) or witness(es). Implement post-crisis procedures. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 167 of 195
  • 171. BOMB THREAT Upon receiving a message that a bomb has been planted in school: ! Use bomb threat checklist. (Page 35 of Emergency Response Plan) ! Ask where the bomb is located, when the bomb will go off, what materials are in the bomb, who is calling, why is caller doing this. ! Listen closely to callerʼs voice and speech patterns, and to noises in background. ! After hanging up phone, immediately dial *57 to trace call. (May be different on your phone system) ! Notify Incident Commander or designee. ! Incident Commander orders evacuation of all persons inside school building(s). ! Incident Commander notifies police (call 911), Executive Director, and Board of Directors Founder. Incident Commander, Executive Director, or Board of Directors Founder must report incident to police. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) Evacuation procedures: " Incident Commander warns students and staff. Do not mention “Bomb Threat”. Use standard fire drill procedures. " Direct students to take their belongings. " Students and staff must be evacuated to a safe distance outside of school building(s). After consulting with Board of Directors Founder, Incident Commander may move students to _______________________ if weather is inclement or building is damaged. Primary relocation center (500 feet is general rule. Consult with local bomb disposal unit) " Teachers take roll after being evacuated. " No one may re-enter the building(s) until fire or police personnel declare them safe. " Incident Commander notifies students and staff of termination of emergency. Resume normal operations. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 168 of 195
  • 172. BUS INCIDENT Bus Driver/Monitor " Ensure the safety of students and staff first. " Call 9-911, if necessary. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) " Notify the school transportation office. " Notify Incident Commander. Incident Commander assembles Crisis Team Members. Site Personnel " Notify CPR/first aid certified persons in school building of medical emergencies (names of CPR/first aid certified persons are listed in Crisis Team Members section). " Assess counseling needs of victim(s) or witness(s). Implement post-crisis procedures. " Incident Commander notifies Board of Directors Founder, Executive Director, and parents of students involved. " Identify location(s) where injured are taken. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 169 of 195
  • 173. FIRE In the event a fire or smoke from a fire has been detected: ! Activate fire alarm. ! Evacuate students and staff to a safe distance outside of building. ! Follow normal fire drill route. Follow alternate route if normal route is too dangerous. ! Teachers take class roster. ! Incident Commander notifies police (call 9-911), Executive Director, and Board of Directors Founder. Incident Commander, Executive Director, or Board of Directors Founder must report incident to Fire Marshal. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) ! Teachers take roll after being evacuated. ! After consulting with Board of Directors Founder, Incident Commander may move students to ____________________ if weather is inclement or building is damaged. Primary relocation center ! No one may re-enter building(s) until entire building(s) is declared safe by fire or police personnel. ! Incident Commander notifies students and staff of termination of emergency. Resume normal operations. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 170 of 195
  • 174. GAS LEAK If gas odor has been detected in the building: ! Evacuate students and staff to a safe distance outside of building. ! Follow normal fire drill route. Follow alternate route if normal route is too dangerous. ! Teachers take class roster. ! Incident Commander notifies police and fire (call 9-911) and Board of Directors Founder. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) ! Teachers take roll after being evacuated. ! After consulting with Board of Directors Founder, Incident Commander may move students to ____________________, if weather is inclement or building is damaged. Primary relocation center ! No one may re-enter building(s) until fire or police personnel declare entire building(s) safe. ! Incident Commander notifies students and staff of termination of emergency. Resume normal operations. If gas odor has been detected outside the building: ! Incident Commander notifies police and fire department (call 9-911) and Board of Directors Founder. Incident Commander or Board of Directors Founder must report incident to Fire Marshal. ! Incident Commander determines whether to shelter in place or evacuate. Fire personnel will assist with decision. ! After consulting with Board of Directors Founder, Incident Commander may move students to ____________________, if weather is inclement or building is damaged. Primary relocation center ! No one may re-enter building(s) until fire or police personnel declare entire building(s) safe. ! Incident Commander notifies students and staff of termination of emergency. Resume normal operations. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 171 of 195
  • 175. GENERAL EMERGENCY ! Notify 9-911 (if necessary) and the Incident Commander. Incident Commander notifies Board of Directors Founder. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) ! Notify CPR/first aid certified persons in school building of medical emergencies, if necessary. Names of CPR/first aid certified persons are listed in Crisis Team Members section. ! Seal off high-risk area. ! Take charge of area until incident is contained or relieved. ! Assemble Crisis Team. ! Preserve evidence. Keep detailed notes of incident. ! Refer media to ______________________________ ______________________________. Spokesperson Telephone Numbers (home, work, mobile) Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 172 of 195
  • 176. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EVENT Incident occurred in school: " Call 9-911. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) " Notify Incident Commander. " Incident Commander notifies Board of Directors Founder. " Seal off area of leak/spill. " Take charge of area until fire personnel contain incident. " Fire officer in charge will recommend shelter or evacuation actions. " Follow procedures for sheltering or evacuation. " Notify parents if students are evacuated. " Resume normal operations after consulting with fire officials. Incident occurred near school property: " Fire or police will notify Board of Directors Founder. " Fire officer in charge of scene will recommend shelter or evacuation actions. " Follow procedures for sheltering or evacuation. " Notify parents if students are evacuated. " Resume normal operations after consulting with fire officials. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 173 of 195
  • 177. INTRUDER/HOSTAGE Intruder- An unauthorized person who Hostage: enters school property: " If hostage taker is unaware of your ! Notify Incident Commander. presence, do not intervene. ! Ask another staff person to accompany " Call 9-911 immediately. Give dispatcher you before approaching guest/intruder. details of situation; ask for assistance from hostage negotiation team. (Insert the ! Politely greet guest/intruder and identify actual sequence to dial 911 from your yourself. phone system) ! Ask guest/intruder the purpose of his/her " Seal off area near hostage scene. visit. " Notify Incident Commander. ! Inform guest/intruder that all visitors must register at the main office. " Incident Commander notifies Executive Director and Board of Directors Founder. ! If intruderʼs purpose is not legitimate, ask him/her to leave. Accompany intruder to " Give control of scene to police and hostage exit. negotiation team. If intruder refuses to leave: " Keep detailed notes of events. ! Warn intruder of consequences for If taken hostage: staying on school property. ! Follow instructions of hostage taker. ! Notify security or police and Incident Commander if intruder still refuses to ! Try not to panic. Calm students if they are leave. Give police full description of present. intruder. (Keep intruder unaware of call for help if possible) ! Treat the hostage taker as normally as possible. ! Walk away from intruder if he/she indicates a potential for violence. Be ! Be respectful to hostage taker. aware of intruderʼs actions at this time (where s/he is located in school, whether ! Ask permission to speak and do not argue s/he is carrying a weapon or package, or make suggestions. etc). ! Maintain visual contact with intruder from a safe distance. ! Incident Commander notifies Executive Director and Board of Directors Founder and may issue lock-down procedures (see Lock-Down Procedures section). Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 174 of 195
  • 178. MEDIA All staff must refer media to site or Helix spokesperson. Helix Network of Educational Choices, Law Enforcement and Fire assume responsibility for issuing public statements during an emergency. (This responsibility shall be pre-determined during the planning process) ! Executive Director serves as the school spokesperson unless he/she designates a spokesperson. If spokesperson is unavailable, an alternate assumes responsibilities. Spokesperson _________________________ _____________________________________ Name Telephone Numbers (home, work, mobile) Alternate Spokesperson ___________________ ___________________________________ Name Telephone Numbers (home, work, mobile) " School Public Information person acts as contact for emergency responders and assists spokesperson with coordinating media communications. If Public Information person is unavailable, an alternate assumes responsibilities. School Public Information person _____________________________ ________________ Name Room # Alternate Public Information person _____________________________ ________________ Name Room # During an emergency, adhere to the following procedures: ! Incident Commander or designee relays all factual information to Board of Directors Founder. ! Board of Directors Founder notifies other Helix schools and may ask School Public Information designee to prepare a written statement to media. ! Establish a media information center away from school. ! Update media regularly. Do not say “No comment”. ! Do not argue with media. ! Maintain log of all telephone inquiries. Use scripted response to respond to inquiries. Media statement ! Create a general statement before an incident occurs. Adapt statement during crisis. ! Emphasize safety of students and staff first. ! Briefly describe schoolʼs plan for responding to emergency. ! Issue brief statement consisting only of the facts. ! Respect privacy of victim(s) and family of victim(s). Do not release names to media. ! Refrain from exaggerating or sensationalizing crisis. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 175 of 195
  • 179. RADIOLOGICAL EVENT Schools within 10-mile radius of (Insert facility name(s)) Nuclear Station: Listen for 3 to 5 minute steady siren blast. This signals public to tune their radios to an Emergency Alert Station (EAS). Schools will be notified if radiological release requires protective actions. There are two basic protective actions: sheltering and evacuation. Sheltering Notification: " Bring all persons inside building(s). " Close all exterior doors and windows. " Turn off any ventilation leading outdoors. " Cover up food not in containers or put it in the refrigerator. " If advised, cover mouth and nose with handkerchief, cloth, paper towels, or tissues. Evacuation Notification: " Incident Commander contacts ___________________________ and informs him/her that evacuation is taking place. transportation coordinator ! Incident Commander notifies students, staff and relocation center. ! Close all windows. ! Turn off lights, electrical equipment, gas, water faucets, air conditioning and heating system. ! Place evacuation sign in window. ! Lock doors. Teacher responsibilities during evacuation: ! Return to homeroom or keep classes intact. ! Take roll. ! Explain procedures to students. Instruct students to take belongings. ! Wait in classroom until Incident Commander or designee informs teachers that buses have arrived. ! Take class roster. ! Take roll again after arriving at the relocation center. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 176 of 195
  • 180. SERIOUS INJURY/DEATH If incident occurred in school: ! Call 9-911. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) ! Notify CPR/first aid certified persons in school building of medical emergencies (names of CPR/first aid certified persons are listed in Crisis Team Members section). ! If possible, isolate affected student/staff member. ! Notify Incident Commander. ! Incident Commander notifies Board of Directors Founder. ! Activate school crisis team. Designate staff person to accompany injured/ill person to hospital. ! Incident Commander notifies parent(s) or guardian(s) of affected student. ! Direct witness(es) to school psychologist/counselor. Contact parents if students are sent to psychologist/counselor. ! Determine method of notifying students, staff and parents. ! Refer media to ________________________________ _____________________________. Spokesperson Telephone Numbers (home, work, mobile) If incident occurred outside of school: ! Activate school crisis team. ! Notify staff before normal operating hours. ! Determine method of notifying students and parents. Announce availability of counseling services for those who need assistance. ! Refer media to ________________________________ _____________________________. Spokesperson Telephone Numbers (home, work, mobile) Post-crisis intervention: " Meet with school counseling staff and __________________________________________ to determine level of intervention for staff and students. or other mental health workers Child Mental Health ! Designate rooms as private counseling areas. ! Escort affected students, siblings, close friends, and other “highly stressed” students to counselors. ! Debrief all students and staff. ! Assess stress level of all students and staff. ! Recommend counseling to overly stressed students and staff. ! Follow up with students and staff who received counseling. ! Designate staff person(s) to attend funeral. ! Allow for changes in normal routines or test schedules to address injury or death. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 177 of 195
  • 181. SHELTERING PROCEDURES Sheltering provides refuge for students, staff, and public within school building during an emergency. Shelters are located in areas that maximize the safety of inhabitants. Safe areas may change depending on the emergency. ! Identify safe areas in each school building. ! Incident Commander warns students and staff to assemble in safe areas. Bring all persons inside building(s). ! Teachers take class roster. ! Close all exterior doors and windows. ! Turn off any ventilation leading outdoors. ! Seal doors, windows, and vents with plastic sheets and duct tape. ! Cover up food not in containers or put it in the refrigerator. ! If advised, cover mouth and nose with handkerchief, cloth, paper towels, or tissues. ! Teachers should account for all students after arriving in safe area. ! All persons must remain in safe areas until notified by Incident Commander or emergency responders. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 178 of 195
  • 182. STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES Incident Commander or designee: ! Verify information. ! Identify Command Post. ! Call 9-911 (if necessary). (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) ! Seal off high-risk area. ! Convene crisis team and implement crisis response procedures. ! Notify Executive Director and Board of Directors Founder. ! Notify students and staff (depending on emergency; students may be notified by teachers). ! Evacuate students and staff if necessary. ! Refer media to spokesperson (or designee). ! Notify community agencies (if necessary). ! Implement post-crisis procedures. ! Keep detailed notes of crisis event. Teachers: " Verify information. " Lock classroom doors, unless evacuation orders are issued. " Warn students, if advised. " Account for all students. " Stay with students during an evacuation. Take class roster. " Refer media to spokesperson (or designee). ! Keep detailed notes of crisis event. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 179 of 195
  • 183. STUDENT UNREST ! Notify police, if necessary. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) ! Ensure the safety of students and staff first. ! Contain unrest. Seal off area of disturbance. ! Notify Incident Commander. ! Incident Commander notifies Executive Director and Board of Directors Founder. ! Warn staff. Incident Commander may issue lock-down (see Lock-Down Procedures section). ! Move students involved in disturbance to an isolated area. ! Meet with student representatives to address issues. ! Document incidents with cassette recorder or take detailed notes. TEACHERS: ! KEEP STUDENTS CALM. ! LOCK CLASSROOM DOORS. ! DO NOT ALLOW STUDENTS TO LEAVE THE CLASSROOM UNTIL YOU RECEIVE AN ALL-CLEAR SIGNAL FROM INCIDENT COMMANDER. ! Make a list of students that are absent from classroom. Document all incidents. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 180 of 195
  • 184. SUICIDE Suicide Attempt in School: ! Verify information. ! Call 9-911. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) ! Notify school psychologist/counselor/social worker, Incident Commander and ______________________________________ Child Mental Health Services (students under 18) or __________________________. Other suicide intervention service " Incident Commander notifies Board of Directors Founder and parent(s) or guardian(s) if suicidal person is student. Incident Commander may schedule meeting with parents and school psychologist/counselor to determine course of action. " Calm suicidal person. " Try to isolate suicidal person from other students. " Ask suicidal person to sign a “no suicide contract”. " Stay with person until counselor/suicide intervention arrives. Do not leave suicidal person alone. " Determine method of notifying staff, students and parents. Hold daily staff debriefings before and after normal operating hours as needed. " Activate school crisis team to implement post-crisis intervention. Determine level of intervention. Suicidal Death/Serious Injury: ! Verify information. ! Activate school crisis team. ! Incident Commander notifies Executive Director and Board of Directors Founder. ! Notify staff in advance of next school day following suicide or attempted suicide. ! Determine method of notifying students and parents. Do not mention “suicide” or details about death in notification. Do not hold memorials or make death appear heroic. Protect privacy of family. ! Implement post-crisis intervention. Post-crisis Intervention: ! Meet with school counseling staff and ______________________________________________ DIV. CHILD MENTAL HEALTH OR OTHER MENTAL HEALTH WORKERS TO DETERMINE LEVEL OF INTERVENTION FOR STAFF AND STUDENTS. " Designate rooms as private counseling areas. " Escort siblings, close friends, and other “highly stressed” students to counselors. " Assess stress level of staff. Recommend counseling to overly stressed staff. " Refer media to _________________________. Do not let media question students or staff. ! Follow up with students and staff who received counseling. Resume normal routines as soon as possible. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 181 of 195
  • 185. TERRORIST EVENT Weapons of mass destruction likely to be employed by terrorists fall into four basic categories: Nuclear, Biological, Chemical, and Conventional. The below outlined procedures will protect students and staff should such attacks occur. Nuclear: Defense against nuclear weapons depends primarily on distance from the point of detonation. If time permits: " Move students and staff to specifically identified basement or lower level rooms. Interior hallways may be used as an alternate. " Close all doors leading into hallways to minimize flying glass. " All people assume the duck, cover and hold position on the ground. " Shut down all utility systems to the building. (Gas and electricity are the priorities) " Shelter in place to protect from fall out if attack is far enough away. " Keep students and staff inside buildings. Allow parents to pick up their children at their own discretion once cleared to do so by public safety, emergency management, or military authorities Biological: Defense against biological attacks is difficult. Awareness of an attack is usually not possible for days or weeks. The first signs may emerge as personnel notice a higher than usual incidence of various symptoms. Should an attack be discovered while in progress, the school should: ! Reverse-evacuate all people into school buildings. ! Shelter in place. (Do not use basements or low lying areas) ! Close all doors and windows. ! Shut down the HVAC system. (Limit airflow from outside) " Seal doors, windows, and vents with plastic and duct tape. ! Keep students and staff inside buildings. Allow parents to pick up their children at their own discretion once cleared to do so by public safety, emergency management, or military authorities. Chemical: ! Reverse-evacuate all people into school buildings. ! Shelter in place. (Do not use basements or low lying areas) ! Close all doors and windows. ! Shut down the HVAC system. (Limit airflow from outside) ! Seal doors, windows, and vents with plastic and duct tape. ! Be prepared to treat students and staff who experience a reaction to the chemical agent. ! The decision to evacuate should be made after consulting with public safety, emergency management, or military authorities. Conventional: The danger from the blast effect of conventional explosive devices is similar to nuclear devices with a higher rate of survivability. If responding to the threat of a imminent blast nearby: " Move students and staff to specifically identified basement or lower level rooms. Interior hallways may be used as an alternate. " Close all doors leading into hallways to minimize flying glass. " All people assume the duck, cover, and hold position on the ground. " Shut down all utility systems to the building. (Gas and electricity are the priorities) " Shelter in place to protect from fall out if attack is far enough away. " Keep students and staff inside buildings. Allow parents to pick up their children at their own discretion once cleared to do so by public safety, emergency management or military authorities If the school is the target: ! Evacuate to pre-designated off site location(s) Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 182 of 195
  • 186. WEAPONS ! Call police if a weapon is suspected to be in school. (Insert the actual sequence to dial 911 from your phone system) ! Ask another administrator or SRO to join you in questioning suspected student or staff member. ! Accompany suspect to private office to wait for police. ! Conduct search with police or SRO. ! Inform suspect of his/her rights and why you are conducting search. ! Keep detailed notes of all events and why search was conducted. ! Notify parent(s) or guardian(s) if suspect is a student. Explain why search was conducted and results of the search. ! If suspect threatens you with a weapon, do not try to disarm them. Back away with your arms up. Remain calm. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 183 of 195
  • 187. WEATHER Severe Weather Watch has been issued in an area near school ! Monitor Emergency Alert Stations (see EAS section) or NOAA Weather Stations (National Weather Service, Weather Channel). ! Bring all persons inside building(s). ! Close windows and blinds. ! Review severe weather drill procedures and location of safe areas. Severe weather safe areas are under desks and in hallways away from windows and large rooms. ! Review drop, cover and hold procedures with students. Severe Weather Warning has been issued in an area near school or severe weather has been spotted near school " Shut off gas. " Move students and staff to safe areas. " Remind teachers to take class rosters. " Ensure that students are in drop, cover and hold positions. " Account for all students. " Remain in safe area until warning expires or until emergency personnel have issued an all- clear signal. BOMB THREAT CHECKLIST Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 184 of 195
  • 188. Description Detail Report Callers Voice - Circle as applicable: Questions to ask: • Calm • Nasal • Angry • Stutter 1) When is the bomb going to explode? • Excited • Lisp • Slow • Raspy 2) Where is it right now? • Rapid • Deep • Soft • Ragged 3) What does it look like? • Loud • Clearing Throat • Laughter • Deep Breathing 4) What kind of bomb is it? • Crying • Cracked Voice • Normal • Disguised 5) What will cause it to explode? • Distinct • Accent • Slurred • Familiar 6) Did you place the bomb? If voice is familiar, whom did it sound like? 7) Why? 8) What is your address? Background Sounds: 9) What is your name? • Street Noises • Factory Machinery Exact wording of the • Animal Noises • Voices threat: • Clear • PA System • Static • Local Call • Music • Long Distance • House Noises • Phone Booth • Motor • Office Machinery Sex of Race • Other Caller: : Length of Age: call: Date: Time: Threat Language: Number at which call was received: • Well Spoken (educated) • Incoherent • Taped Notes: • Foul • Message read • Irrational by threat maker Remarks: Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 185 of 195
  • 189. Notice of First Aid Care DATE: _______________________ SCHOOL: ____________________ Dear Parent: ______________________________________ was injured at school and has been given first aid. If you feel further care is necessary, please consult your family physician. Destination: (If not presently on site) ______________________________________________________ Transporting Agency: (if not presently on site) _______________________________________________ Time: ____________________ Remarks: Please sign and return one copy to school. Retain a copy for your records. _________________________________ _____________________________________ PARENTʼS SIGNATURE SCHOOL REPRESENTATIVEʼS SIGNATURE Note: 1 copy goes home with student 1 copy stays with teacher or medical treatment team records Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 186 of 195
  • 190. Sample School-Parent Letter [Date] Dear Parents: Should an emergency or disaster situation ever arise in our area while school is in session, we want you to be aware that the schools have made preparations to respond effectively to such situations. In fact, public schools in [State] are built to meet stringent construction standards, and they may be safer than your own home in the event of a disaster. Should we have a major disaster during school hours, your student(s) will be cared for at this school. Our school has a detailed disaster plan which has been formulated to respond to a major catastrophe. Your cooperation is necessary in any emergency. ! Do not telephone the school. Telephone lines may be needed for emergency communication. ! In the event of a serious emergency, students will be kept at their schools until they are picked up by an identified, responsible adult who has been identified as such on a green school emergency card. These cards are required to be filled out by parents at the beginning of every school year. Please be sure you consider the following criteria when you authorize another person to pick up your child at school: ! S/he is 18 years of age or older. ! S/he is usually home during the day. ! S/he could walk to school, if necessary. ! S/he is known to your child. ! S/he is both aware of and able to assume this responsibility. ! Turn your radio to [radio stations] for emergency announcements. If students are to be kept at school, radio stations will be notified. If electrical service is not affected, information will be relayed via the school cable on Channel ____. In addition, information regarding day-to-day school operations will be available by calling the School Office. ! Impress upon your children the need for them to follow the directions of any school personnel in the event of an emergency. Students will be released only to parents and persons identified on the school emergency card. During an extreme emergency, students will be released at designated reunion gates located on school campuses. Parents should become familiar with the School Emergency Disaster Plan and be patient and understanding with the student release process. Please instruct your student to remain at school until you or a designee arrives. Because local telephone service may be disrupted, also list an out-of-state contact on the emergency card, as calls may still be made out of the area while incoming calls are affected. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 187 of 195
  • 191. Sample School-Parent Letter (Continued) The decision to keep students at school will be based upon whether or not streets in the area are open. If streets in the area are not open, radio stations will be notified. In the event that a natural disaster takes place during the time that students are being transported, students will be kept on the bus and the driver will ask for assistance through radio contact with the school and Helix personnel. Any child who is home waiting for the bus will not be picked up (if roads are impassable) and will remain the responsibility of the parent or guardian. In the event that a natural disaster occurs in the afternoon, the driver will make every attempt to continue delivering the students to their homes. Should road conditions prevent the driver from delivering students to their home or to school in the morning, the students will be delivered to the nearest school site, and that school will communicate with the home school to inform them of the studentsʼ whereabouts. In case of a hazardous release event (chemical spill) near the school area, Shelter-in- Place procedures will be implemented to provide in-place protection. All students and staff will clear the fields and report to their rooms, and all efforts will be made to prevent outside air from entering classrooms during the emergency. “Shelter-in-Place” signs will be placed in classroom windows or hung outside classroom doors during a drill or emergency. Students arriving at school during a Shelter-in-Place drill or event should report to the school office or to a previously designated area at the school, as classrooms will be inaccessible. When the dangerous incident has subsided, an all- clear signal will be given. Please discuss these matters with your immediate family. Planning ahead will help alleviate concern during emergencies. Sincerely, Principal School Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 188 of 195
  • 192. Annual Site Plan Review Each school site emergency response plan must be reviewed at least once each year. It is recommended that this review be conducted prior to the start of each school year. Additionally, the plan must be reviewed any time weaknesses in the plan are identified during a drill, exercise, or an actual emergency event. Schools should include their local emergency response, emergency management, and public health agencies in the review process. Review plan for compliance with the Helix minimum requirements. Minimum Requirements Checklist, Appendix C. Review ICS assignments and responsibilities, update as needed. Ensure NIMS compliance for all personnel assigned responsibilities in the ICS structure. Review on- and off-site assignments and staging areas. Make contact with any identified off-site locations to ensure permission to use those locations is still in affect. Review existing emergency procedures. Are the procedures adequate to address identified hazards/threats? Have new hazards/threats developed that you must plan for? Notes: Date of Review: Reviewer: Reviewer: Reviewer: Reviewer: Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 189 of 195
  • 193. Helix Homeless Student Policy To expedite the school registration process while ensuring continuity of education for homeless children, the proposed school will follow the mandates of Federal Public Law 100-7, the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. It is the policy of Helix to immediately enroll homeless students even if the students are unable to produce the records normally required by non-homeless students for enrollment. Homeless students are defined as individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate night- time residence and include the following: 1. Children and youth who are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason; are living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative adequate accommodations; are living in emergency or transitional shelters; are abandoned in hospitals; or are awaiting foster care placement. 2. Children and youth who have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designated for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings. 3. Children and youth who are living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings. 4. Migratory children who meet one of the above described circumstances. For entry into the proposed school and as proof of legal domicile, a letter from area homeless or spouse abuse shelter facilities stating that a specific individual or family is currently residing at that facility shall suffice. Families known to be homeless or recently homeless, but not currently residing in a shelter facility, may claim a need for waiver of legal domicile. Such families should be directed to the school social worker or principal for determination on a case-by-case basis. The following can be used as admissible evidence for date of birth for homeless children in the school registration process: 1. A duly attested transcript of the child's birth record filed according to law with a public officer charged with the duty of recording births; 2. A duly attested transcript of a certificate of baptism showing the date of birth and place of baptism of the child, accompanied by an affidavit sworn to by the parent; 3. An insurance policy on the child's life that has been in force for at least two years; 4. A bona fide contemporary Bible record of the child's birth, accompanied by an affidavit sworn to by the parent; or 5. A passport or certificate of arrival in the United States showing the age of the child. 6. If none of these evidences can be produced, an affidavit of age sworn to by the parent, accompanied by a certificate of age signed by a public health officer or by a public school physician, or if neither of these shall be available in the county, by a licensed practicing physician designated by the Board of Directors, which certificate shall state that the health officer or physician has examined the child and believes that the age as stated in the affidavit is substantially correct. Homeless children shall have a 30 school day grace period from the time of enrollment to produce proof of age, physical exam, or immunization records. In accordance with Louisiana Charter School statute, a student considered to be homeless will be permitted, if expelled, to attend an alternative Helix school, unless the student is expelled from all schools. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 190 of 195
  • 194. In accordance with Louisiana Charter School Statute, students who become homeless while enrolled in the proposed school will be provided transportation--at the request of parents or guardians--to and from the school they attended prior to becoming homeless. At the beginning of each academic year, the principal of the proposed school will designate a local liaison for homeless children and youths. The liaison will serve as the primary contact between homeless families and school staff, parish personnel, shelter workers and other service providers, and will keep parents informed about available resources and services to help ensure the academic success of the student. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 191 of 195
  • 195. Appendix: Strategic Achievement Plan Helix schools will be required to develop a comprehensive Plan for School Success to meet the expectations of the Criteria for Academic Success, Criteria for Operational Success, and the goals of the charter. Goals and strategies will be determined by the school leadership team under the direction of the Principal and the Helix Director of Achievement. The work of the school leadership team will be driven by the Plan for School Success, which will serve as a roadmap for achieving the goals. Classroom teachers and Teacher Leaders, under the direction of the school leader, will be responsible for monitoring the academic progress of each student within their team by logging all assessment data, adjustments to the instructional program as a result of the analysis, any interventions implemented, and their effectiveness. When the progress of the students is determined to be unsatisfactory, the School Leaders and the studentsʼ faculty advisor will collectively determine a plan of action that will include, if necessary, the allocation of additional resources to ensure the success of the students. In the event that the quarterly evaluation of student progress shows that the educational programming in place is ineffective, and the established annual goals of the charter are at risk of not being achieved, the Director of Achievement will support school leadership in an extensive educational and operational review to determine what obstacles are inhibiting the success of students individually and collectively. This review will determine if the Plan for School Success is driving the work of the school and will answer the question, “Are the key components of the plan below being fully implemented?” Example key components of the Plan for School Success include: ! School Leadership Literacy Program Action Plan ! Student Evaluation Plan ! Professional Development Plan In the event that the review findings show that any of the above has not been fully implemented, the Executive Director, in collaboration with the Principal and Director of Achievement, will facilitate development and assist in oversight of a strategic plan to ensure academic and operational success as defined in the charter application. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 192 of 195
  • 196. Appendix: Start Up Plan The Helix Start Up Plan is provided in the following pages. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 193 of 195
  • 197. Appendix: Helix Start-Up Plan The Helix Start-Up plan provides school start-up tasks and target dates in the following areas: 1. Staffing 2. Recruitment, Selection, and Enrollment of Students 3. Special Education and Student Scheduling 4. Facilities Services 5. Order and Deliver Curriculum Materials 6. Professional Development Staffing Recruit/Select/Hire School Leader Task Earliest: Latest: Draft advertisement for school leader 25-Aug 1-Sep Approve advertisement 26-Aug 2-Sep Run advertisement in local newspaper and area career placement newsletters 27-Aug 3-Sep Make “networking” contacts to recruit a diverse field of candidates for school leader 28-Aug 4-Sep Receive and organize letters of interest and resumes 10-Sep 17-Sep Organize selection committee 3-Sep 10-Sep Review applications and select candidates for interview based on weighted evaluation 10-Sep 17-Sep Evaluate applicant pool for diversity 10-Sep 17-Sep Complete interview schedule 11-Sep 18-Sep Conduct interviews with candidates and selection committee 18-Sep 25-Sep Identify finalist(s) 24-Sep 1-Oct Check references 30-Sep 7-Oct Align compensation with budget 2-Oct 9-Oct Recommend school leader 5-Oct 12-Oct Hire school leader 1-Oct 15-Oct Recruit/Select/Hire Staff Task Earliest: Latest: Draft advertisement(s) for staff 25-Jan 1-Feb Approve advertisement(s) 29-Jan 5-Feb Run advertisement(s) in local and national newspaper and area career placement newsletters 1-Feb 8-Feb Make “networking” contacts to recruit candidates to create diverse field 3-Feb 10-Feb Receive and organize letters of interest and resumes 19-Feb 26-Feb Review applicant pool for diversity 22-Feb 1-Mar Review letters of interest, applications, and resumes and select candidates for all interviews 26-Feb 5-Mar Complete candidate interviews schedule 5-Mar 12-Mar Conduct interviews wth candidates and selection committee 8-May 19-Mar Align compensation with budget 15-Mar 22-Mar Check references, conduct finalist interviews 17-Mar 24-Mar Get school leader approval, if possible 19-Mar 26-Mar Hire staff 25-Mar 1-Apr
  • 198. Recruitment, Selection, and Enrollment of Students Task Earliest: Latest: Establish startup office 25-Oct 1-Nov Identify office support staff 25-Oct 1-Nov Install equipment for application data system 25-Oct 1-Nov Provide training to office support staff, as needed 25-Oct 1-Nov Prepare and mail announcement about enrollment process to parents 8-Nov 15-Nov Identify community liaisons 8-Nov 15-Nov Solicit and organize parent support 8-Nov 15-Nov Customize student intent forms (English and Spanish, other languages as needed) 24-Nov 1-Dec Review and approve intent forms 8-Dec 15-Dec Duplicate and distribute intent form in the community 25-Dec 1-Jan Provide materials for community presentations 25-Dec 1-Jan Conduct community presentations 1-Jan 8-Jan Monitor completed student intent forms for number and compliance with diversity goals 19-Feb 26-Feb Conduct student lottery (if necessary) 22-Feb 1-Mar Establish list of selected students; establish waiting list 23-Feb 2-Mar Send letters inviting selected students to enroll 8-Mar 15-Mar Send letters informing other applicants of waiting list status 12-Mar 19-Mar Continue monitoring of student enrollment until count day 24-Sep 1-Oct Begin enrollment process 8-Mar 15-Mar Review IEP, bilingual, and ESOL requirements for special needs students* 8-Jun 15-Jun *Earliest opportunity to review student needs, ongoing as needed (details: Special Education Appendix (CF3) Special Education and Student Scheduling Planning for Special Needs Task Earliest: Latest: Identify students whose applications indicated IEPs 8-Jun 15-Jun Identify students whose applications indicated bilingual or ESOL services 8-Jun 15-Jun Gather and review IEPs on special education students 12-Jun 19-Jun Gather and review language skill level on bilingual or ESOL students 12-Jun 19-Jun Devise plans for serving special education students 3-Jul 10-Jul Devise plans for serving bilingual and ESOL students 3-Jul 10-Jul Confer with principal regarding staffing, scheduling, and budgeting implications for special education 8-Jul 15-Jul Confer with principal regarding staffing, scheduling, and budgeting implications for bilingual and ESOL programs8-Jul 15-Jul Advise special education staff of special education plan 10-Jul 17-Jul Advise bilingual and ESOL staff of bilingual and ESOL program plans 10-Jul 17-Jul Convey special education plans to special education and regular education staff 13-Jul 20-Jul Convey bilingual and ESOL program plans to bilingual, ESOL, and regular education staff 13-Jul 20-Jul Coordinate schedule for special education students 17-Jul 24-Jul Coordinate schedule for bilingual and ESOL students 17-Jul 24-Jul Work with parents to develop or revise IEPs as needed 22-Jul 29-Jul Work with parents to develop or revise bilingual and ESOL programs as needed 22-Jul 29-Jul Scheduling Develop Model Student Schedules Task Earliest: Latest: Feasibility Analysis of school (coordinate with facilities) 8-Apr 15-Apr Produce draft school schedule 26-Apr 3-May School leadership team reviews schedule (Principal/Leadership) 30-Apr 7-May Review implications of schedule (Facility, Budget, Staffing Materials, Training) 3-May 10-May Align schedule implications to budget 7-May 14-May Add Leadership Team Training to school schedule 10-May 17-May Add Staff Training to school schedule 14-May 21-May School schedule approval 17-May 24-May
  • 199. Facilities Services Task Earliest: Latest: Define operations requirements: custodial, maintenance, security, transportation, food service, groundskeeping, pest controle, trash removal 25-Jan 1-Feb Establish operations strategy (i.e., self-perform, district buyback, subcontract) 27-Jan 3-Feb Establish bus contract for SPED 29-Jan 5-Feb Establish bus routes 1-Feb 8-Feb Establish bus loading/unloading plan 3-Feb 10-Feb Notify parents of bus routes/times 5-Feb 12-Feb Establish Food Service Contract 8-Feb 15-Feb Establish utility accounts - Electric, Fuel, Telephone 10-Feb 17-Feb Hire Operational Staff 12-Feb 19-Feb Establish maintenance contract 15-Feb 22-Feb Establish furniture plan/requirements 17-Feb 24-Feb Identify furniture requirements 19-Feb 26-Feb Order and Deliver Curriculum Materials Task Earliest: Latest: Determine what curriculum and instructional materials will be provided, based on projected enrollment 22-Feb 1-Mar Devise written inventory showing what materials will be used from site inventory 24-Feb 3-Mar Consult with education partners to determine what materials should be ordered 26-Feb 5-Mar Arrange for placement of orders for technology and materials 1-Mar 8-Mar Determine projected delivery dates for technology and materials 3-Mar 10-Mar Identify technology and materials that are on back-order. Make alternate arrangements, if possible 5-Mar 12-Mar Apprise School Leader of materials delivery plans, including inventory and schedule 8-Mar 15-Mar Plan for delivery of materials to the school site -- determine where/when space will be available to stage delivery 10-Mar 17-Mar Establish system for tracking delivery of technology and materials to site and for distributing materials to classrooms 12-Mar 19-Mar Confirm delivery of technology and materials on site 15-Mar 22-Mar
  • 200. Professional Development Provide Opening Year Training Task Earliest: Latest: Determine topics to be covered, experts for start-up professional development, and on-going relationships 22-Mar 29-Mar Identify site for local start-up professional development 22-Mar 29-Mar Identify materials and equipment needed for professional development 22-Mar 29-Mar Develop schedule for pre-opening professional development using regional training cohort 26-Mar 2-Apr Arrange for materials and equipment for professional development 2-Apr 9-Apr Communicate schedule and plan for professional development to staff 8-Apr 15-Apr Conduct professional development seminars 12-Apr 19-Apr Arrange for ongoing professional development 19-Apr 26-Apr Develop Master Calendar to determine dates for ongoing professional development 23-Apr 30-Apr Orientation Conduct Welcoming/Orientation for Families/Students Task Earliest: Latest: Begin enrolling students 22-Apr 29-Apr Identify parent and community volunteers to plan orientation and welcoming events 28-Apr 5-May Recruit parent volunteers 5-May 12-May Organize meetings to introduce parents to house teachers and teacher assignments 12-May 19-May Conduct meetings to introduce parents to house teachers and teacher assignments 19-May 26-May Explain special programs and school's approach to special needs students 19-May 26-May Conduct welcoming/orientation events 25-May 1-Jun Plan opening day activities, including locations and dates 27-May 3-Jun Inform parents/students of orientation and welcoming events by mail 31-May 7-Jun
  • 201. Helix Parent Complaint Policy Helix places high value on grace, courtesy, respect and responsibility. As such, we encourage parents/guardians and staff to develop open lines of communication with each other for the benefit of the children attending the school. However, we acknowledge that from time to time, situations may arise that are upsetting. If a parent/guardian, student, staff member, or other individuals or groups are not satisfied with a school decision or policy, we encourage the aggrieved party to take the following steps in accordance with the Helix parent complaint policy. ! Discuss the complaint with the staff member that has direct responsibility for the problem. ! Within a week, take the complaint directly to the staff member involved (in the case of violation of laws or issues with school-wide policies, the school leader would be the appropriate staff member) to resolve the problem through discussion. ! The proposed school is committed to using communication to work out problems; therefore, if needed, the two parties involved may request mediation from the staff memberʼs immediate supervisor. ! If the aggrieved party is not satisfied, within a week s/he must move to step 2. ! Discuss the complaint with the staff memberʼs immediate supervisor. ! If a solution is not found between the two parties involved, then it should be taken to the staff memberʼs immediate supervisor for discussion, including use of mediation as necessary. If the original complaint was with the school leader and discussion (as mentioned in step 1) has not worked, move directly to step 3. ! This should continue through the ranks until the complaint has been resolved, or until the aggrieved party discusses the problem with the school leader. ! If the complaint has not been satisfactorily addressed after talking with the school leader, move to step 3. This should occur no later than a month from the original complaint. ! Submit the complaint in writing to the school leader. ! The school leader may speak to all parties involved and will try to resolve the issue through discussions with those people. Otherwise, within two weeks, the school leader will give a written decision concerning the complaint, which will give the reasons for the decision. ! If the school leaderʼs written decision is unsatisfactory, move to step 4 within 1 week. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 194 of 195
  • 202. ! Submit the complaint in writing to the Founder of the Board of Directors. ! Upon receiving the written complaint, the Founder shall request copies of all written communications from Step 3. ! The Founder shall convene a committee of the Helix Board (with no fewer than 3 members present) that shall meet within 10 working days to discuss the issues. Those involved in the complaint shall have a right to attend the meeting. ! The compliance committee of the Helix Board will conduct reviews to ensure compliance with the law. The proposed school and the specific individuals involved will cooperate to the fullest extent with the review. ! The compliance committee of the board shall decide on the matter by majority vote and shall respond in writing to the person issuing the complaint and the school leader no later than 30 days from the receipt of the complaint. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 195 of 195
  • 203. Appendix: Budget The Helix Budget is provided in the following pages. Helix High School: STEM – Charter Proposal Page 196 of 196