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Linking Words

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Guidance notes for teenage early B2 students.

Guidance notes for teenage early B2 students.

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  • 1. Linking Words<br />
    • Link arguments for and against - contradictionsExplanationPart of SpeechHowever, some people think they are annoying.Nevertheless,On the other hand,Usually comes at the beginning of the second sentence or paragraph that contradicts the idea in the first sentence or paragraph. Followed by a subject and verbBeginning, middle or end of second sentence. Followed or preceded by a comma.Adverb or Adverbial PhraseDespite the bad weather, he wasn’t wearing a coat.In spite of thefreezing weather, he isn’t wearing a coatDespite it being cold, he isn’t wearing a coatJoin two contrasting ideas in the same sentence.Followed by a a gerund, noun or pronoun. Beginning or middle of a sentence.PrepositionAlthough it was cold, he wasn’t wearing a coat.While the weather is cold in England, it is hot in Seville.Even thoughJoin two contrasting ideas in the same sentence.Followed by a subject and verbBeginning or middle of a sentence.ConjunctionGive more reasons for your argumentExplanationPart of SpeechWhat is more, most people agree with me.BesidesFurthermore,Links ideas in two different sentences or paragraphs. Followed by a subject and verbUsually at the beginning but also possible in the iddle or end of second sentence.Followed or preceded by a comma.Adverb or Adverbial Phrase
    • 2. Explain the consequences of somethingExplanationPart of SpeechFor this reason, I have prepared this worksheet.Therefore,Links ideas in two different sentences or paragraphs. Followed by a subject and verbUsually at the beginning but also possible in the middle or end of second sentenceFollowed or preceded by a comma.Adverbial PhraseCompare two different situations ExplanationPart of SpeechWhile the first photos shows two people sailing, the second photo shows two people waterskiing.The first photo shows two people in the jungle, whereas the second photo shows two people in the mountainsCompares two situations in one sentenceFollowed by a subject and verbUsually in the middle but also possible at the beginning of the sentenceConjunction
    Linking WordsStudent A<br />
    • Link arguments for and against - contradictionsExplanationPart of SpeechHowever, some people think they are annoying._____________________________On the other hand,Usually comes at the beginning of the second sentence or paragraph that contradicts the idea in the first sentence or paragraph. Followed by a subject and verbBeginning, middle or end of second sentence. Followed or preceded by a comma.Adverb or Adverbial PhraseDespite the bad weather, he wasn’t wearing a coat.In spite of thefreezing weather, he isn’t wearing a coat__________________________________________Join two contrasting ideas in the same sentence.Followed by a a gerund, noun or pronoun. Beginning or middle of a sentence.PrepositionAlthough it was cold, he wasn’t wearing a coat._________________________________________Even thoughJoin two contrasting ideas in the same sentence.Followed by a subject and verbBeginning or middle of a sentence.ConjunctionGive more reasons for your argumentExplanationPart of SpeechWhat is more, most people agree with me._________________________________________Furthermore,Links ideas in two different sentences or paragraphs. Followed by a subject and verbUsually at the beginning but also possible in the iddle or end of second sentence.Followed or preceded by a comma.Adverb or Adverbial Phrase
    • 3. Explain the consequences of somethingExplanationPart of SpeechFor this reason, I have prepared this worksheet.Therefore,Links ideas in two different sentences or paragraphs. Followed by a subject and verbUsually at the beginning but also possible in the middle or end of second sentenceFollowed or preceded by a comma.Adverbial PhraseCompare two different situations ExplanationPart of Speech______________________________________________________________________________________________The first photo shows two people in the jungle, whereas the second photo shows two people in the mountainsCompares two situations in one sentenceFollowed by a subject and verbUsually in the middle but also possible at the beginning of the sentenceConjunction
    Linking WordsStudent B<br />
    • Link arguments for and against - contradictionsExplanationPart of SpeechHowever, some people think they are annoying.Nevertheless,______________________________________________Usually comes at the beginning of the second sentence or paragraph that contradicts the idea in the first sentence or paragraph. Followed by a subject and verbBeginning, middle or end of second sentence. Followed or preceded by a comma.Adverb or Adverbial PhraseDespite the bad weather, he wasn’t wearing a coat.In spite of thefreezing weather, he isn’t wearing a coat______________________________________________Join two contrasting ideas in the same sentence.Followed by a a gerund, noun or pronoun. Beginning or middle of a sentence.PrepositionAlthough it was cold, he wasn’t wearing a coat.While______________________________________________Join two contrasting ideas in the same sentence.Followed by a subject and verbBeginning or middle of a sentence.ConjunctionGive more reasons for your argumentExplanationPart of SpeechWhat is more, most people agree with me.Besides_______________________________________________Links ideas in two different sentences or paragraphs. Followed by a subject and verbUsually at the beginning but also possible in the iddle or end of second sentence.Followed or preceded by a comma.Adverb or Adverbial Phrase
    • 4. Explain the consequences of somethingExplanationPart of SpeechFor this reason, I have prepared this worksheet.______________________________________________Links ideas in two different sentences or paragraphs. Followed by a subject and verbUsually at the beginning but also possible in the middle or end of second sentenceFollowed or preceded by a comma.Adverbial PhraseCompare two different situations ExplanationPart of SpeechWhile the first photos shows two people sailing, the second photo shows two people waterskiing.________________________________________________________________________________________________Compares two situations in one sentenceFollowed by a subject and verbUsually in the middle but also possible at the beginning of the sentenceConjunction