Facilities Management Outlook II: Talent Management

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The talent initiatives taking precedence among progressive FM departments and the diverse skill sets they seek in senior facilities officers, and professionals involved in capital projects and energy management.

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Facilities Management Outlook II: Talent Management

  1. 1. Facilities Construction Real Estate Engineering R E TA I N E D E X E C U T I V E S E A RCH Facilities  Management  Outlook  2012 Part  II Talent  Management  StrategiesAs  discussed  in  our  Facilities  Management  Outlook  2012  Part  I,  facilities  Management  (FM)  has  evolved  over  the  last  several  years  to  become  a  critical  component  in  the  overall  success  of  institutions.    FM  professionals  now  work  strategically  with  executive  teams  on  progressive  initiatives  such  as  technology  integration,  sustainability,  energy  efficiency,  green  building  and  alternative  project  delivery  methods.    These  changes  have  prompted  two  responses.    One,  institutions  have  to  attract  and  secure  talented  professionals  who  have  broad  skill  sets  and    two,  FM  professionals  have  to  diversify  themselves  to  accommodate  new  strategies  and  demands.    Within  this  outlook,  we  look  at  the  talent  management  initiatives  that  are  prevalent  among  healthcare  and  higher  education  institutions  as  they  focus  on  attracting  and  securing  professionals  who  can  assist  them  in  achieving  their  objectives.    ‣ Recruitment  of  professionals  with  diverse  competencies. Recruitment  challenges  include:    an  aging  workforce,  lack  of  succession  /  transition  strategies  and  a  shortage  of  professionals  with   specific  skill  sets.    All  of  these  combine  with  departments  being  expected  to  do  more  with  less  people  and  less  money.     Across  the  board,  institutions  are  looking  for  the  following  skill  sets  in  FM  professionals: • Managerial  skills. FM departments • Continuous  improvement  mentality. face recruitment • Proactive  approach  to  maintenance.     challenges such as: • Knowledge  of  sustainability  and  green  initiatives. • Ability  to  hire,  train,  motivate  and  empower  staff. an aging workforce, • Understanding  of  current  trends  and  best  practices. lack of succession • Comprehension  of  computerized  maintenance  management  systems. and transition • Excellent  communication  skills,  verbal  and  written,  and  in  delivering   strategies and a presentations.   • Demonstrated  successful  management  of  budgets  and  ability  to  work  within  an   shortage of organization’s  financial  constraints. competent • Strong  business  acumen  with  the  ability  to  calculate  ROI  for  maintenance,  energy   professionals with and  capital  projects  expenditures.   • Ability  to  identify  and  implement  utility  cost  saving  measures  with  an  eye  towards   specific skill sets. increased  efficiency,  sustainability  and  environmental  focus.    ‣ Recruitment  of  capital  project  professionals. With  construction  activity  increasing  for  new  facilities  and  renovations,  institutions  find  value  in  securing  professionals  who   understand  how  to  manage  the  planning,  design,  and  construction  of  large  and  complex  projects.    This  includes  knowledge  of   construction  management,  the  benefits  and  risks  associated  with  alternative  delivery  methods  and  an  understanding  of   applications  such  as  BIM.     To  perform  these  responsibilities,  organizations  are  seeking  LEED  AP-­‐certified  professionals  and  senior  level  project  managers. Advanced  certifications  and  degrees  are  also  of  interest  including  Professional  Engineering  Licenses,  Architectural  Registration   and  Project  Management  Professional  designation.
  2. 2. ‣ Recruitment  of  energy  management  professionals. After  salaries,  utility  costs  are  the  largest  single  line  item  institutions  have  and  they  are  always  looking  for  ways  to  reduce  those   expenditures.    Tremendous  opportunities  in  savings  can  be  realized  through  optimizing  equipment,  practices  and  efficiencies.   Currently,  roles  that  have  increased  demand  are  Director  of  Sustainability,  Director  of  Utilities,  Commissioning  Manager  and  Energy   Manager  /  Engineer.    The  ultimate  objective  of  securing  these  individuals  is  to  reduce  energy  consumption  and  greenhouse  gas   emissions.    They  are  also  accountable  for  obtaining  the  best  prices  on  utilities  through  aggressive  purchasing;  for  effectively   upgrading  equipment  to  achieve  better  efficiency  and  a  strong  return  on  investment  (ROI);  and  for  improved  usage  metering.  ‣ Attracting  and  securing  senior  facilities  officers. Most  senior  FM  professionals  are  now  playing  key  roles  in  their  institutions’  overall  strategies,  capital  programs  and  major   initiatives.    It  has  become  imperative  for  these  individuals  to  have  the  ability  to    effectively  communicate  their  thoughts  and  ideas   to  directors  and  boards  to  illustrate  how  these  concepts  directly  correlate  to  the  long-­‐terms  goals  and  success  of  an  organization.     To  accomplish  lofty  objectives,  senior  FM  professionals  now  need  to  have  traits  and  skills  that  go  well  beyond  traditional  FM   such  as: • Strong  financial  aptitude. It has become • Innovative,  change  agent  mindset. imperative for senior • Technological  savvy  to  lead  by  example. facilities officers to • Inclusive  and  empowering  leadership  style.   have the ability to • Understanding  of  strategies  and  execution  leadership. effectively • Comprehension  of  technological  advancements  and  trends. communicate their • Ability  to  create  a  culture  of  adaptability  and  accountability. thoughts and ideas to • Adeptness  at  building  and  leading  high-­‐performance  teams. directors and boards • Capability  to  foster  a  collaborative  work  environment  that  empowers   to illustrate how employees. these concepts • Solid  understanding  of  energy  management,  systems  reliability,  life  cycle   operating  costs  and  deferred  maintenance. directly correlate to the long-term goals • Soft  skills  that  are  necessary  to  develop  and  maintain  strong  relationships   with  the  public,  boards,  analysts,  shareholder  groups,  senior  administration,   and success of an government  entities  and  end  users.   organization. Increased  responsibilities  and  expectations  and  these  new  desired  skill  sets  make  filling  senior-­‐  and  officer-­‐level  positions  more   difficult  and,  at  the  same  time,  more  critical  to  the  overall  success  of  organizations.    ‣ Increased  interest  in  advanced  degrees  and  certifications  of  professionals. Organizations  have  an  increased  interest  in  professionals  who  have  taken  the  initiative  to  obtain  advanced  degrees  and   certifications  such  as: Certified  Energy  Manager  (CEM) Facility  Management  Professional  (FMP) Certified  Facility  Manager  (CFM) High  Pressure  Steam  License   Certified  Healthcare  Engineer  (CHE) LEED  AP Certified  Healthcare  Facility  Manager  (CHFM) Professional  Engineer  (PE) Certified  Healthcare  Safety  Professional  (CHSP) Project  Management  Professional  (PMP) Energy  Engineering  License Registered  Architect  (RA) Facilities  Management  Administrator  (FMA) Sustainability  Facility  Professional  (SFP)
  3. 3. ‣ Increased  attention  and  consideration  to  the  Emotional  Intelligence  of  candidates. Emotional  Intelligence  (EI)  has  been  proven  to  significantly  impact  a  person’s  ability  to  lead  an  organization,  business  unit  or  team.     Post-­‐recession,  it  has  been  given  increasing  consideration  in  prospective  candidates.    EI  provides  a  way  to  understand  and  assess  a   person’s  behaviors,  management  styles,  attitudes,  interpersonal  skills  and  potential. Individuals  with  the  characteristics  of  high  EI  demonstrate: • Optimistic  and  positive  attitude. • Decisiveness  and  self-­‐motivation. • Ability  to  adapt  quickly  to  market  changes  and  to  develop  creative  solutions. • Understanding  of  how  to  effectively  handle  difficult  or  highly  emotional  situations. • “Participative  management”  style  and  adeptness  at  getting  people  to  “buy-­‐in”  to  initiatives  and  goals. • Understanding  of  how  to  build  relationships  –  with  subordinates,  with  superiors,  with  customers  and  with  teams. • Appreciation  of  the  importance  of  listening  to  others  and  gathering  their  input  before  implementing  major  changes.  ‣ Succession  Planning. The  majority  of  institutions  have  yet  to  establish  formal  succession  plans  but  these  programs  are  receiving  more  attention  than  in   the  past.    The  most  immediate  issue  driving  succession  planning  is  the  aging  workforce,  which  has  the  potential  to  leave  a   significant  experience  gap  in  many  organizations.    Strategic  advantages  of  succession  planning  are  having  the  ability  to  be   proactive  with  talent  management,  grooming  subordinates  to  advance  successfully  within  your  organization,  ensuring  that  internal   professionals  continue  to  provide  value,  and  retaining  good  employees  by  having  a  clear  career  path  and  progression.  As  FM  continues  to  be  a  more  integral  part  of  overall  strategies,  its  role  and  responsibilities  will  continue  to  change  and  add  value  to  the  financial  stability  of  institutions.    These  changes  will  continue  to  provide  opportunities  to  talented  professionals  who  have  the  desire  to  impact  the  success  of  their  organizations.  Authors:   To  subscribe  to  Helbling’s  quarterly  AEC  and  FM  e-­‐   Sami  L.  Barry,  Strategic  Business  Development Newsle=ers  and  Assignment  Alerts,  visit  our  home  page  at     James  G.  Lord,  Managing  Director www.helblingsearch.com.   Joseph  F.  Wargo,  Managing  Consultant Social  Media: Blog:    blog.helblingsearch.comRelated  Information: Twi=er:    @helblingsearchCase  study:       Facilities  Planning  &  Capital  Development  executive  search  performed  for  a  nationally  recognized  academic  health  systemBlogs:     Emotional  Intelligence:    Why  Your  Next  Leader  Should  Have  It   FM:    Salaries  |  Demographics  |  Changing  Roles ✓ HELBLING & ASSOCIATES, INC. RETAINED EXECUTIVE SEARCH RESPONSIVE RELIABLE Motivation  and  urgency  to  fulfill  your  needs Comprehensive  and  accurate  market  intelligence RESULTS Performance  that  exceeds  your  expectations RESOURCEFUL RELATIONSHIPS Extensive  network  of  contacts  in  your  industry Consulting  based  upon  trust  and  commitment Pittsburgh w w w . h www.helblingsearch.com c h . c o m elblingsear 724.935.7500

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