Heidi croy final project
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Heidi croy final project

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Heidi Croy presents "Lure of the Labyrinth" and "Prisoners of War": two excellent online games for older students.

Heidi Croy presents "Lure of the Labyrinth" and "Prisoners of War": two excellent online games for older students.

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  • Good morning. My name is Heidi Croy and today I’ll be presenting two free educational, online games that are specifically for older students
  • The first will be The Lure of the Labyrinth by Fablevision
  • The first will be The Lure of the Labyrinth by Fablevision
  • The second is Prisoners of War by Noble Prize dot org
  • The second is Prisoners of War by Noble Prize dot org
  • games to teach colors and taking turns
  • games that reinforce physical coordination & balance === it would be incorrect to suggest that games are limited to teaching younger kids.
  • games to teach anticipation and strategy
  • games that introduce business philosophies and investment principals like risk and budgetingbut not all games teach something worth learning...
  • However, I did find that these two games, Lure of the Labyrinth and Prisoners of War to be engaging, challenging, and easily integrated into the curriculum, and I liked that they were specifically designed for older students.
  • Lure of the Labyrinth is a game that was created specifically for grades 6 and up and it was designed to help develop math and logic skills and reinforce literacy. It can be played as a one-player game, but it’s really quite challenging, even for me as an adult, and if you’re playing with young people, its best they work in groups. I’ll get into that in a little bit, but first I want to introduce you to the game.
  • It is immediately appealing in its graphics and audio: it’s very comic-book-y and the music is dramatic and a bit suspenseful, like something you might hear in an action-adventure movie, so it draws you right in.The premise of the game is that you have lost your pet, and you have to go through this labyrinth to find it and all along the way there are logic games that you need to complete successfully in order to move on. The story is told through these comic book pages, and they give you a clue as to what kind of puzzle ahead of you.
  • For example, in this puzzle which is called “employee cafeteria”, you must deduce, through trial and error, that each of these monsters wants a particular amount of food. The object is to fill each of these monsters’ trays completely, and to win, you have to do it before you burn out the green indicator lights.
  • You begin by pressing the green button, and out pops a food with a number attached to it. Then you must decide which monster to give it to.
  • The first time you try this puzzle, the snaky lizard guy might only want food in multiples of ten, where as that the big purple one in the middle wants half as much as squid wants.
  • Even if you don’t complete the game successfully, you get points for what you have done correctly, and you get to try it again as many times as you like. Each time you try, the logic behind the monsters’ preference changes, so players truly are learning concepts. It’s not a formula, where every time its played the purple monster gets half as much as the squid. Each time you play it, you’re figuring out a different pattern. Actually, that’s what’s great about the game. Students can give each other helpful hints and tips, but since every time a puzzle is accessed it is slightly different, it is impossible to cheat or to pass the level without understanding the math skill necessary.
  • In this game, your task is to create a batch of the recipe listed here using these ingredients and these measuring devices.
  • But often it isn’t just one scoop of this and two scoops of that—you have to use more than one cup of an ingredient to get the right amount. For example. Here we need 7 eyeballs, but we have no eyeball scoop. We need to fill up the 9 unit measuring device
  • Then you pour the nine into the two, and seven is left in the nine.
  • Alright, so how do teams or groups of students communicate? While you’re in the labyrinth, there’s an icon that you can click for collaboration.
  • This is the page at which you first sign in to play, and you can see there is a page dedicated to educators
  • Clearly can be a supplement for prealgebra and algebra, multiplication tables, etc. But also can be used to build interpersonal skills and cooperation, can be a teambuilding exercise, or it could be enrichment for your gifted students, or simply a reward. You could even have your students design their own puzzle outside of the game. Not limited to bright kids—good resource for students who “don’t like” math.
  • Premise is that your country is at war and the authorities have decided to set up a POW camp, and they need someone to run it, someone knowledgeable about the Geneva Convention.
  • Your first task is to build a POW camp, selecting the necessary facilities from the list provided.
  • Your first task is to build a POW camp, selecting the necessary facilities from the list provided.
  • Your first task is to build a POW camp, selecting the necessary facilities from the list provided.
  • Premise is that your country is at war and the authorities have decided to set up a POW camp, and they need someone to run it, someone knowledgeable about the Geneva Convention.
  • However, I did find that these two games, Lure of the Labyrinth and Prisoners of War to be engaging, challenging, and easily integrated into the curriculum, and I liked that they were specifically designed for older students.

Heidi croy final project Heidi croy final project Presentation Transcript

  • Heidi Croy
    presents
    Learning through (online) games
  • Lure of the Labyrinth
    http://www.fablevisionstudios.com/project.php?id=3
  • Prisoners of War
    http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/peace/redcross/
  • Why games?
  • Images:
    http://farm1.static.flickr.com/38/74637244_69c673cab8_o.jpg
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f9/Twister_dial.jpg
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mukumbura/4043364183/
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3144/4040181094_b5c3e179b2.jpg
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3047/2379226143_defc77b68a.jpg
  • links:http://delicious.com/heidi.croy/Games
  • Thank you.