Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The Lefferts Homestead 교육용 인터페이스 개발

504

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
504
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Lefferts Homestead Ariel Newland, Dunja Pantic, Hee Jung
  • 2. The Lefferts Homestead is a historic house located in Prospect Park in the Prospect Lefferts Gardens neighborhood of Brooklyn. Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, who also designed Central Park, designed the park. Currently, the house is open to the public as a museum through the Historic House Trust. It receives over 22,000 diverse visitors every year, including 3,000 children from school groups. The house is open to the public from Thursday to Sunday. It is also host to many special events, such as Flax and Fleece, where the public learns about how the Dutch used these materials in their daily lives.
  • 3. The Lefferts Homestead The Lefferts came from Holland in 1660 and settled in Flatbush. The original house was burned by British troops during the American Revolution. House was rebuilt in 1783 and used by the Lefferts until 1918, when it was moved to its current location in the park. The house was occupied by five generations of the Lefferts family as well as their slaves and servants. The Lefferts were a reasonably wealthy Dutch farming family. The family owned one of the largest farms in the area. Family members were leading citizens in Flatbush, active both in the church and the government. King’s County was the first colony outside of Manhattan along the Native American trail. Flatbush developed as the trail was widened. It was a prominent farming area at the time. It was occupied by tribes of the Algonquin, who used the land for fishing and farming, leaving little impact on the landscape. For them, there were no owners of land, it was there to use and protect. When the Dutch arrived, they claimed pieces of land and pushed the Native Americans down to smaller segments, eventually causing them to leave the area all together. The Dutch grew a variety of crops such as vegetables, wheat and hay. In the 1820s, major changes came to the agriculture of Flatbush. These changes included the opening of the Erie Canal, which allowed for major transport of grains from the Midwest, and the emancipation of slaves in New York in 1827. The Dutch began growing more vegetables to sell to the markets of Brooklyn and Manhattan. This market gave back to the farmers by providing manure to make the soil rich for growing plants. The Dutch also began to rent their land to Irish tenant farmers since they no longer had free labor from the slaves. In the late 1800s, John Lefferts and John A. Lott invested in wells, improved roads, gas, telegraph, and improved municipal services for the development of Flatbush. John Lefferts divided his land into hundreds of lots to create Lefferts Manor, a residential community restricted to middleclass whites. The establishment of Prospect Park also made this area very attractive to homeowners.
  • 4. Educational Programs School Program 13 April 2007 We visited a school program and found many strengths and drew inspiration from the experience. The enthusiasm of the children and their knowledge of history was very impressive. The children were split into three groups and went to stations throughout the house. The first was upstairs, in Femmetje Lefferts’ room, where the children identified ways she would have kept warm and activities she would have done in the room. The next was in the front parlor, where the children identified and posed as the groups of people who once occupied Flatbush and dressed in copies of clothing from the time. The last was in the double parlor, where the children played with hands on objects and then selected one that they liked for the museum educator to discuss how it was used. Afterwards, they went to lunch in the wigwam next to the house.
  • 5. Special Events Flax and Fleece Day 29 April 2007 Fleece and Flax is one of the special events hosted by the house every year. Activities include plowing the ground, planting flax seeds, washing and carding wool, weaving, and observing a spinner dressed in period appropriate costume make balls of yarn from flax. This is a crucial event for the house as it engages the public in how the Dutch experienced daily life in Flatbush.
  • 6. Strengths Weaknesses - Educational element of the park - Unknown to the public (lack of PR) - The location - Needs more design aspects (more visible signage) - Family friendly environment - Needs more visual recreation of history - One of the well-documented historic houses - Needs more hands-on elements - Hands-on learning - Enriches the history of Brooklyn - Diversity of audience
  • 7. Initial Proposals In observing the strengths and weaknesses of the house, we found a problem we wanted to address in that people do not know about the house and it does not have a large presence in the activities at the park. Some of the proposals we came up with initially include: • White linen sheets installation • Egg shells • Potato canon • Outdoor panel exhibition • Outdoor life-size game • Cell phone tagging • 80s board games outdoors
  • 8. Design Precedents We looked at precedents for outdoor play spaces to inspire our design process including these samples of landscape architecture design by C.F. Shuler, Inc. These included a series of overlooks, play spaces, outdoor classrooms and interpretive facilities at a water recharge park and an outdoor learning garden for a nearby school.
  • 9. Goals We wanted to incorporate physicality and educational history into a playful Our project sets out to achieve the following goals: solution. We have proposed an educational play space. It is composed of a - attract more people to the house series of rolodexes of themed questions throughout the garden that create a - provides play and activity even when house is closed journey adventure through the history of the area. - provides historical information that may not be learned in a normal visit - make house more approachable to children - provides activity for children from general public - can be played by one person - does not require supervision from staff at the house
  • 10. Each rolodex is composed of a series of historical themed questions. The The rolodexes are made from brass, a material that was used by the Dutch. cards are 38 inches from the ground, providing for ease of use by children It is important that materials and aesthetics of the time are used in making as they are in their reach height. Each rolodex has a theme color. objects for the house. The brass cards would be etched with the questions, with a color fill placed in the etched areas.
  • 11. Lefferts Homestead Fun, holidays and celebration The Canarsee Agriculture Dutch and Native American relations History of Flatbush Avenue (plank road) Each rolodex has a theme involving history of Brooklyn. They are dispersed Tenant farming throughout the garden, with an effort to place them near areas they relate History of Brooklyn Education in Flatbush to. A player of the activity could start at any rolodex. By getting the answers to questions correct, he or she would then move between the rolodexes, Religion in Flatbush creating the journey adventure through the history of the area. If he or she gets the answer wrong, they must remain at the rolodex until they get a Slavery in flatbush correct answer. We have created sample cards for three of the rolodexes. The Dutch Lefferts Historic House
  • 12. The Dutch Canarsee Agriculture European merchants used “fashion dolls” to In the 1620s and 30s the Dutch, along with The Dutch learned much about the land of advertise their dresses to European women other Europeans, settled the areas inhabited Long Island from the Canarsee. What native in America. Describe your own dress. by the Canarsee, they had little understanding Long Island plants did the Dutch utilize? of the way of life of the Native Americans, nevertheless they learned a variety of skills from the population. Can you guess what front some of these skills were? lettuce potatoes corn fashion doll squash apples seagrass The gird and burn means of clearing the land Using local plants for herbal remedies back squash seagrass corn Great job! If you were right: go to the Dutch and Native American Relations station If you were right: go to the Canarsee station Go to: the Religion in Flatbush station If you were wrong: stay here If you were wrong: stay here
  • 13. The Dutch Canarsee Agriculture Unlike how today’s children get toys from toy The Native Americans have lived by The Dutch grew many types of fruits and stores, children of Dutch settlers made their agriculture since 2000 BC. Maize was the vegetables. Match the plants with how they toys. Can you tell how to play it? Pretend most common grain, they also ate several grow. playing cup the ball. varieties of beans and squash, potatoes, peanuts, chili peppers, cacao, and avocados. Which of the following foods were not eaten front by the Native Americans? tree lettuce potatoes corn vine hamburger chocolate above ground chili pepper squash cup the ball apples squash asparagus avocados below ground pizza tree apples vine back squash above ground lettuce asparagus corn below ground potatoes Great job! If you were right: go to the Fun, Holidays and Celebration station If you were right: go to the Religion station Go to: the History of Brooklyn station. If you were wrong: stay here If you were wrong: stay here
  • 14. The Dutch Canarsee Agriculture Femmetje Lefferts (1753 – 1847) was a The Native Americans did not have money Who worked on a typical Dutch farm in remarkable woman at the time. She ran as we do today, they had something called Flatbush in the 1700s to early 1800s? the house and farm after her husband the “Wampum”, what do you think this was? After slaves were freed in 1827? died. What would she have had in her possession at the time? front donuts marbles seashells slave men Dutch men slave children Irish men bed warmer fan cell phone slave women Dutch women Dutch children Irish women water basin 1700s to early 1800s After 1827 slave men Dutch men Dutch men Irish men back bed warmer water basin slave women Dutch women fan Dutch women Irish women slave children Dutch children Dutch children If you were right: go to the Dutch and Native American Relations station If you were right: go to the History of Brooklyn station If you were right: go to the Slavery station If you were wrong: stay here If you were wrong: stay here If you were wrong: stay here
  • 15. The Dutch Canarsee Agriculture Pieter Janse Hagewout Lefferts (1645 The men and women in the various Native The Dutch had to milk their cows twice per – 1704), the first of the Lefferts to settle in American tribes had different tasks to do, day, once in the morning and once in the Flatbush, took the ship de Bronte Koe (the which of the following activities were carried evening. Pretend to milk a cow. Spotted Cow) from the Netherlands and out by women and which by men? landed in New Amsterdam, now known as cooking Manhattan. What kind of ship did he take? making pots front fishing raising children herding and shearing sheep fetching water farming spinning wool hunting 1. Pick opposite teats. 2. Push up and then squeeze gently. processing animal hides 3. Squirt milk from one side and then the other. protecting the house women: cooking, making pots, raising children, herding and shearing sheep, fetching water, spinning wool, processing back animal hides men: fishing, hunting, farming, protecting the house If you were right: go to the Lefferts Homestead station If you were right: go to the Tenant Farming station If you were wrong: stay here Great job! If you were wrong: stay here Go to the Lefferts Homestead station
  • 16. The Dutch Canarsee Agriculture The Dutch settlement in Flatbush in the When the Europeans came, the population of What helped the Dutch grow plants in 1600s affected names of the area. Can you the Canarsee had decreased by 75% of 4000 Flatbush? recognize the following Dutch words? people, why do you think this happened? - The Europeans brought diseases from horse manure Europe, such as smallpox and diptheria Breukelen front flat land - The Dutch took over the land because they were more powerful. Vladbos tractor -The Native Americans wanted to go to Europe. rocky land Breukelen - The Europeans brought diseases from Brooklyn was named after the Europe, such as smallpox and diptheria Dutch town of Breukelen. back horse manure flat land Vladbos - The Dutch took over the land because they Flatbush came from the word Vladbos, were more powerful. which means wooden land. If you were right: go to the Tenant Farming station If you were right: go to the Education in Flatbush station If you were right: go to the Flatbush Avenue station If you were wrong: stay here If you were wrong: stay here If you were wrong: stay here
  • 17. Bibliography Holliday, Billy. Personal Interview. 6 April. 2007. Jablonski Berkowitz Conservation, Inc. Lefferts Homestead Historic Structure Report. Ed. Christopher S. Clarke, Ph.D. New York: Random, 2002. Mendes, Isak. Personal Interview. 13 April. 2007. NYC architecture. http://www.nyc-architecture.com/BKN/BKN006.htm http://www.bklyn-genealogy-info.com/People/sud.html http://www.richmondhillhistory.org/Lefferts.html http://www.richmondhillhistory.org/man.html http://www.historichousetrust.org/item.php?i_id=19 http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/ http://www.ostrom.us/Architectural-Graphics/Brass_Signs.htm

×