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Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
Quick Guide to Infographics
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Quick Guide to Infographics

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Here is a quick 5-minute guide to get anyone to get started with creating or designing infographics.

Here is a quick 5-minute guide to get anyone to get started with creating or designing infographics.

Published in: Design, Technology, Education
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  • 1. 5-MINUTE GUIDE TO Infographics Prepared by Hedren Sum
  • 2. “ In a way, we’re all visual now. Every day, every hour, maybe even every minute, we’re seeing and absorbing information via the web. We’ve steeped in it. Maybe even lost in it. So perhaps what we need are welldesigned, colourful and – hopefully – useful charts to help us navigate or a better way to see and understand information. ” David McCandless Author, Information is Beautiful
  • 3. What are infographics? “ Infographics are visual presentations intended to communicate complex information quickly and clearly. The devices include, according to Doug Newsom (2004), charts, diagrams, graphs, tables, maps and lists. The basic material of an infographic is the data, information, or knowledge that the graphic presents. ” Information Archive www.infographicsarchive.com Image source: Infographic by Desbenoit from The Noun Project
  • 4. Formats of Infographics Extracted from book, Infographics: the power of visual storytelling By Column five
  • 5. Most common format of infographic, where people use as an still image for print, web or both Typically contains fixed information and user interaction consists of viewing and reading Common types of static infographics include: o  Company internal reporting and presentation o  Editorial or brand-centric content for blogging or dissemination Created using Piktochart, the infographic can be exported as a still image or added to a blog post or web page using an embed code. View infographic at http://goo.gl/xZw5gW
  • 6. An opportunity to communicate message to your viewers in a powerful way through animated or moving graphics Better served with a narrative function with limited passive user interaction (e.g. play, pause, stop, rewind or fast-forward controls on the output player) Typically contains fixed information and user interaction consists of viewing, listening (if there is voiceover) and reading Stills from motion infographic, “Open Text/The Power of Information”. The infographic is accompanied with voiceover and music. View infographic at http://goo.gl/VIXEGp
  • 7. Particular useful to present vast amount of information that encourage viewers to explore further Information may be fixed and hard-coded (manual updates) or drawn from a dynamic source (automatic updates) User interaction consists of clicking, searching for specific data, actively shaping the content displayed, and choosing what information to be accessed and visualised From “The Evolution of the Web” interactive infographic. It shows major development of the web. It allows user to scroll and click to view each of the development in detail. Users can also change view of the infographic. View infographic at http://goo.gl/FDqnmu
  • 8. Typical steps in creating an infographiC Select a topic Organise information Generate infographic
  • 9. Select a topic Think of the following: o  What is the story you would like to tell? o  Is research or data suitable for creation of visuals? o  Is your topic concise enough to be communicate across in a short sentence? o  What are the key questions or areas that you would like to focus? o  Who is your intended audience? o  Is there any targeted channels or platforms? Image source: Zoom in by Garrett Knoll from The Noun Project
  • 10. Organise information When organising the information for your infographic, start with the most powerful piece of information to attract your audience. Order your information in a logical flow and build towards a clear conclusion and a call-foraction at the end. Indicate your sources of data to communicate reliabilty and validity of your infographic. Image source: Descend by Richard Schumann from The Noun Project
  • 11. Generate infographic Determine the suitable format to your targeted audience, channels or platforms. Leverage on available online applications to generate your infographic, such as: http://infogr.am http://piktochart.com Share your infographic to appropriate channels, such as blogs, Slideshare, Flickr, Behance, etc. Image source: Infographic by Desbenoit from The Noun Project
  • 12. WHAT MAKES AN INFOGRAPHIC GOOD? IMAGE SOURCE: WHAT MAKES GREAT INFOGRAPHICS BY SLIDESHARE
  • 13. Thank You
  • 14. CREDITS Lankow, J., Ritchie, J., & Crooks, R. (2012). Infographics: The power of visual storytelling. Hoboken, N.J: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. McCandless, D. (2009). Information is beautiful. London: Collins. SlideShare. (2013). What makes great infographics [Infographic]. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/Slideshare/071813slideshare-making-great-infographics2-iglh

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