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  • Video highlighting the challenges of being relevant to todays studentsAnd the challenge for students to deal with the information and technical tsunami that is their daily lives, what is educations role?
  • Im going to throw up some statistics regarding the movement towards VISUAL, multi modal online experience.
  • Text rather than talk.Meet online than in person, North America There are 54 million singles in the United States. 5.5 million of those use dating services[6] 81% of members of dating sites lie about their height, weight, or age in their profiles85% of our buying is online, 1 in 4 purchases atstarbucks are made with phone,More than 1 in 4 UK adults claim that online product reviews have a major influence on their purchasing decisions. TGI, June 201158% of purchase decisions begin on search engines GroupM, February 201127% of people rarely or never look at more than one page of search engine results. Verdict Research as cited by digitalstrategyconsulting.com, April 201129% of people think the placement of a brand on the search results page reflects the importance of the brand company. Verdict Research as cited by digitalstrategyconsulting.com, April 201151% of people expect leading brands to be on top of the search results page. Verdict Research as cited by digitalstrategyconsulting.com, April 201163% of people normally find websites via a search engine. Verdict Research as cited by digitalstrategyconsulting.com, April 201190% of consumers use the internet to research vehicle purchases. Kia Motors as cited by Marketing Week, March 2011Who is directing this research, who is the authority? If we don’t know basics of technological and information literacy, why would students? Consumerization of information. Personal determinations of Value and worth is being based on results by for profit companies. Dumbing down and it’s a problem. Who is the decider? http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/6868/ -- Nicholas Carr
  • Text rather than talk.Meet online than in person, North America There are 54 million singles in the United States. 5.5 million of those use dating services[6] 81% of members of dating sites lie about their height, weight, or age in their profiles85% of our buying is online, 1 in 4 purchases atstarbucks are made with phone,More than 1 in 4 UK adults claim that online product reviews have a major influence on their purchasing decisions. TGI, June 201158% of purchase decisions begin on search engines GroupM, February 201127% of people rarely or never look at more than one page of search engine results. Verdict Research as cited by digitalstrategyconsulting.com, April 201129% of people think the placement of a brand on the search results page reflects the importance of the brand company. Verdict Research as cited by digitalstrategyconsulting.com, April 201151% of people expect leading brands to be on top of the search results page. Verdict Research as cited by digitalstrategyconsulting.com, April 201163% of people normally find websites via a search engine. Verdict Research as cited by digitalstrategyconsulting.com, April 201190% of consumers use the internet to research vehicle purchases. Kia Motors as cited by Marketing Week, March 2011Who is directing this research, who is the authority? If we don’t know basics of technological and information literacy, why would students? Consumerization of information. Personal determinations of Value and worth is being based on results by for profit companies. Dumbing down and it’s a problem. Who is the decider? http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/6868/ -- Nicholas Carr
  • The REALITY? The way that we, as consumers, interact with the world is the SAME way that students interact with information and educationRepeatSo, if the way we interact is changing, way we consume is changing then the way we ….
  • How we learn is changing too. And the educations response to that has to be
  • This presentation will highlight some ways, hows and what that technology can affect.Let me explain- Begin with who. Who are the new consumers (this includes most of us)
  • Rewarded in a digital environment – shallow superficial learning. Jack of all, master of none. That is the self perception of most of us but studies show that because most of this superficial learning comes from self directed exploration- we know EVEN LESS THEN WE THINK WE DO.No one is teaching us the core social media programs we need, the best privacy practices, the best study habits, the best newspapers to read, there is no western canon of modern life. Where do you start and when do you stop? Deep attention vs. Hyper attention. Humming bird vs woodpecker (lets remove the judgment from this, it is what it is)Multi tasking- again, our brains haven’t evolutionarily caught up with the technology. We think we are MT but we aren’t. we either aren’t really multi tasking, we are just hummingbird-ing. Or we are multi tasking and doing it all very poorly.
  • In addition they might be studying, reading, talking to friends, eating, etc.
  • Most of us are self taught, because there is NO ONE teaching us how navigate, learn apps, stay in touch and make sound decisions about where to invest our time So who becomes the decider?Self select via peer group or the Market makes decisions for them- just like the we do when we make consumer decisions. Direct implications for student learning outcomes- recognize and explain complex social institutions and culturesThink critically? Separate self and society? Analyze communication? Engage in research? This leads to the issue of consumerization of information (hello, Google I’m talking to you). http://www.columbiastate.edu/File/TBR%20learning%20outcomes%20for%20Psychology.pdf
  • This is one essential way the library can be relevant and directly effect student learning outcomes, and create lifelong learnersThis of course means we need to teach using effective technologies that make sense, not that are just the next cool thing
  • Skills and principles- what we just talked about – informing students about the consumerization of information, that it’s a commodity bought and sold and how to be Socratic learners, informed citizens.The last two things I am going to touch on is the inspiration and the technology.
  • 5,000 hours reading a lifetime, 10,000 gaming- visual is powerful
  • 5,000 hours reading a lifetime, 10,000 gaming- visual is powerful
  • To be effective educators, especially online, we have to tell a storyJon Robertson Director of Learning and development lynda.comProduction quality mattersIncorporate graphics, video, audioUse technology (speak their language)Be inspiring and relevantSupport non linear learningCreate deeper associations by engaging and having experiential moments- in other words turn the camera around- which leads to the next area
  • To be effective educators, especially online, we have to tell a storyJon Robertson Director of Learning and development lynda.comProduction quality mattersIncorporate graphics, video, audioUse technology (speak their language)Be inspiring and relevantThe library has a great story. We are the center of their universe, the mighty oz (in front of the curtain) they just don’t know it. TELL THEM. Use statistics, charts, graphs, videos, audio to explain why the library is relevant and the internet and Google has pitfalls. Support non linear learningCreate deeper associations by engaging and having experiential moments- in other words turn the camera around- which leads to the next areaTell a story
  • Henry Jenkins, MIT, et all, macArthur foundation white paperEducators must work together to ensure that every American young person has access to the skills and experiences needed to become a full participant, can articulate their understanding of how media shapes perceptions, and has been socialized into the emerging ethical standards thatshould shape their practices as media makers and participants in online communities.
  • memberships, formal and informal, in online communities centered around various forms of media, such as Friendster, Facebook, message boards, metagaming, game clans, or MySpace). producing new creative forms, such as digital sampling, skinning and modding, fan videomaking, fan fiction writing, zines, mash-ups).working together in teams, formal and informal, to complete tasks and develop new knowledge (such as through Wikipedia, alternative reality gaming, spoiling).Shaping the flow of media (such as podcasting, blogging).
  • Addressing education through participatory culture is an opportunities for educators to address these pitfalls (and by the way directly address learning outcomes)A growing body of scholarship suggests potential benefits of these forms of participatory culture, including opportunities for peer-to-peer learning, a changed attitude toward intellectual property, the diversification of cultural expression, the development of skills valued in the modern workplace, and a more empowered conception of citizenship. Access to this participatory culture functions as a new form of the hidden curriculum, shaping which youth will succeed and which will be left behind as they enter school and the workplace.Some have argued that children and youth acquire these key skills and competencies on their own by interacting with popular culture
  • Collaborative documents, a synchronistic group workMind mapping- non linear learning, conceptualizing, deconstructionZines, blogs, web sites- debunking and creatingKickstarter projects- tie to valuesAlternate Reality GamingData MiningClass expand -international, go where the action isFocus on creation skills versus sampling skillsGo beyond discussion boards, and even pollsInline commentingFlipped classroomGive an outlet for creative expressions outside the classroom, but keep them safeMoseley, A. (2008), An Alternative Reality for Higher Education? Lessons to be learned from onlinereality games. In: ALT-C 2008, Leeds, UK, 9-11th September 2008 (Unpublished).Available:http://moerg.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/moseley2008a.pdf

Summer college Summer college Presentation Transcript

  • Innovative Technologies and Student Success
  • Innovative Technologies and Student Success Heather LambertEmerging Technologies Librarian MTSU, Walker Library
  • Mediatedcultures.net http://mediatedcultures.net/
  • When Google Images launched in 2001, 250million images were indexed. By 2005, this was upto a billion images. Now, in 2010, there are over10 billion images indexed. TechCrunch, July2010
  • 14 million – Number of Instagram accountscreated during 2011.
  • 100 billion – Estimated number of photos onFacebook by mid-2011.
  • 140 – The number of YouTube video playbacksper person on Earth.
  • 48 hours – The amount of video uploaded toYouTube every minute.
  • 201.4 billion – Number of videos viewed onlineper month (October 2011).
  • 88.3 billion – Videos viewed per month onGoogle sites, incl. YouTube (October 2011).
  • Way we interact is changingWay we consume is changing
  • Way we interact is changingWay we consume is changing
  • Way we interact is changingWay we consume is changing
  • Way we interact is changingWay we consume is changingWay we learn is changing
  • Way we teach has to change
  • Way ^we teach has to change
  • WhatWay ^we teach has to change
  • Shallow superficial learningSelf Taught Skimmers
  • There is an ugly side to technology – and a price to educators ignoring it
  • The TRUTH:Digital Natives ≠ digital literacy orinformation literacy
  • Information Literacy Technological Literacy
  • Information and Technological Literacy
  • Technology is driving all of us, we need to helpstudents take control, make better choices andbe critical consumers
  • visual is powerful
  • http://s3-ec.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/web05/2011/12/2/17/enhanced-buzz-wide-1392-1322863709-9.jpg
  • Jaws-
  • Jaws-• Determined that Shark was bigger than originally thought• Decided that they would need a bigger boat
  • Options: Xtranormal: cloud NOT free, teacherSlide Rocket: free through google requested education rateapps (we don’t have yet) but free for Goanimate: cloud, free limited butindividuals cloud based education account for full controlledPrezi: cloud based, free education accessaccount Makebeliefscomix: free, cloudZoho: cloud based, also a google ToonDoo: free, cloudapps, free Pixton: free, cloud but educationPrezentit: account for full controlled accessVcasmo: cloud based and free PhototoMovie: limited free, full accessPowerpoint costGoogle Presentation Slideshow movie maker: open sourceKeynote: Mac freeSlide roll: free cloud based Screenr: cloud, freeSlide Share: free cloud based Stupeflix: cloud, free for one, cost forPhotostory 3: Microsoft only, free bulkSmile box: Opensource, free YouTube Video Editor: free cloudImpressSound slidesAnimoto: cloud free
  • participatory cultures.“A participatory culture is a culture with relatively lowbarriers to artistic expression and civic engagement,strong support for creating and sharing one’s creations,and some type of informal mentorship whereby what isknown by the most experienced is passed along tonovices. A participatory culture is also one in whichmembers believe their contributions matter, and feelsome degree of social connection with one another (atthe least they care what other people think about whatthey have created)”http://digitallearning.macfound.org/atf/cf/%7B7E45C7E0-A3E0-4B89-AC9C-E807E1B0AE4E%7D/JENKINS_WHITE_PAPER.PDF
  • Forms of participatory culture include: Affiliations / Expressions Collaborative Problem-solving / Circulations
  • The Participation Gap — the unequal access to theopportunities, experiences, skills, and knowledge thatwill prepare youth for full participation in the world oftomorrow.The Transparency Problem — The challenges youngpeople face in learning to see clearly the ways thatmedia shape perceptions of the world.The Ethics Challenge — The breakdown of traditionalforms of professional training and socialization thatmight prepare young people for their increasinglypublic roles as media makers and communityparticipants.
  • Summary-Chalkboards, even electronic ones aren’t effective tools Know your audience, and know what they don’t know, ya know? Create Participatory Explorations Demonstrate technological and information literacy Tell a great story
  • http://emergingtechwl.blogspot.com/hlambert@mtsu.eduTwitter- heatherneptune