Introduction to Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team
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Introduction to Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team

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This introduction was given at the International Humanitarian Technology Conference. http://ihtc.ieee.ca/ . This workshop session was run with Samuel Paul Alce and Pierre Beland of HOT OSM.

This introduction was given at the International Humanitarian Technology Conference. http://ihtc.ieee.ca/ . This workshop session was run with Samuel Paul Alce and Pierre Beland of HOT OSM.

Summary: Since the Haiti  earthquake in 2010, new partners support the UN Agencies and International organizations through the Web 2.0 or Collaborative Web.  OpenStreetMap is one of these community of volunteers. It has shown on several occasions its ability to mobilize hundreds of contributors and support remotely, providing maps and services necessary for such actions. The Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) makes the bridge with the humanitarian organizations.
In this session, we will discuss open source methods for humanitarian technology. The workshop will include an overview of Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team’s (HOT) activities, some of the tools and best practices. We will include stories of activations around the world from Indonesia to Haiti to Philippines and the DRC. Our session also includes hands on training from HOT community leaders. Join us and learn about new methods in digital and in-person responders using OpenStreetMap.

Hot.openstreetmap.org

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  • This introduction was given at the International Humanitarian Technology Conference. http://ihtc.ieee.ca/ . This workshop session was run with Samuel Paul Alce and Pierre Beland of HOT OSM. <br /> <br /> Summary: Since the Haiti  earthquake in 2010, new partners support the UN Agencies and International organizations through the Web 2.0 or Collaborative Web.  OpenStreetMap is one of these community of volunteers. It has shown on several occasions its ability to mobilize hundreds of contributors and support remotely, providing maps and services necessary for such actions. The Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) makes the bridge with the humanitarian organizations. <br /> In this session, we will discuss open source methods for humanitarian technology. The workshop will include an overview of Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team’s (HOT) activities, some of the tools and best practices. We will include stories of activations around the world from Indonesia to Haiti to Philippines and the DRC. Our session also includes hands on training from HOT community leaders. Join us and learn about new methods in digital and in-person responders using OpenStreetMap
  • The Crisismappers Network is informal, self-organized and global. Member include citizens, governments, research/academic, companies, open source organizations and almost every sector related to conflict and crisis informatics. The community often uses open source culture, tools and methodology <br /> Crisismappers.net <br /> <br /> http://crisismappers.net/page/intro-to-crisismapping <br /> <br /> http://digitalhumanitarians.com/ <br /> <br /> <br />
  • OpenStreetMap is a project with the goal of “free map of the entire world”. This “free world map goal” happens to be especially useful in times of crisis or disaster. This is where the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team comes in. We connect the more informal OSM community to traditional response organizations by coordinating digital volunteers and providing training/guidance to communities/organizations on the ground. <br /> <br /> (slide created by Kate Chapman)
  • What is OSM? More details about the wider community. http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=13/45.5315/-73.5624 <br /> http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/
  • The community self-organizes using a number of tools from GPS to wiki. http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Main_Page <br /> http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/HOT
  • Learnosm.org, http://mapgive.state.gov/ <br /> Maptime.io <br />
  • Via Hal Seki – Sinsai Info (Japan) http://www.slideshare.net/hal_sk/ <br />
  • Here is an example of the type of mapping HOT does. The picture on the right is Port-au-Prince Haiti in OSM before the January 2010 Earthquake and the picture on the left is just 4 weeks later.
  • http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Haiti
  • Hot.openstreetmap.org – We write impact uses, blog posts and share stories about activations around the world.
  • Via Sinsai.info (Slide created by Hal Seki, OpenStreetMap Japan Foundation http://www.slideshare.net/hal_sk/ <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_T%C5%8Dhoku_earthquake_and_tsunami
  • Flooding reported by neighborhoods, but their was previously no way to view that on a map. So in March 2012 HOT, UNOCHA, the University of Indonesia, Indonesian Disaster Management Agency, the Jakarta Disaster Management Agency and Australian Aid worked together to pre-map the city. There are 267 urban villages in Jakarta and paper maps were sent to all of them. They where then invited to one of six workshops and asked to bring the paper maps plus someone else from their office that could help locate things. Then college students from the university of Indonesia sat down and helped to enter the critical infrastructure and neighborhood boundaries into OSM. The neighborhood boundaries were crucial, there wasn’t a complete map of them available and it was also recorded if that area had flooded in 2007. (Slide via Kate Chapman)
  • So you’ve seen how it works from the Internet. Now let’s talk about HOT’s work connecting the digital realm to communities. Lubumbashi is a city in the DRC. There is not a detailed basemap available with street names. For effective public health having this basemap can be crucial. It allows determination of when a response to a potential outbreak is needed, makes it easier to direct health workers and generally can make work more efficient. A HOT volunteer spent a week in Lumbumbashi working with the University of Lubumbashi and MSF to create this first basemap. (slide via Kate Chapman) <br /> <br /> http://hot.openstreetmap.org/updates/2014-04-01_a_week_in_lubumbashi_drc
  • There are many mapping groups within the Crisismappers Network. We believe that digitally we can share and make a difference in our world for each other, our neighbours and you. This session was a HOT workshop I ran in Nairobi for the Typhoon Haiyan response. <br /> http://digitalhumanitarians.com/ <br /> http://hot.openstreetmap.org/updates/2013-11-22_hot_mapping_party_at_iccm_in_nairobi <br /> Photo 1 – HOT Mapping Party Nairobi ICCM 2013

Introduction to Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team Introduction to Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team Presentation Transcript

  • A community in action: Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team IEEE – International Humanitarian Technology Conference Heather Leson June 1, 2014
  • DataMaps Analysis Community
  • @hotosm @openstreetmap
  • Edit maps using several data sources like GPS logger GPS Logger Printed maps Satellite imagery Import other map data
  • OpenStreetMap and Contributors CC-BY-SA
  • 11 Japan: More than 500 users wrote 500,000+ ways in first two months.
  • T H A N K Y O U heather@textontechs.com @heatherleson crisismappers.net hot.openstreet.org