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Enc1102drafting lty
 

Enc1102drafting lty

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    Enc1102drafting lty Enc1102drafting lty Presentation Transcript

    • Drafting “Literacy, Technology, and You”
    • Share
      • What audience did you choose?
      • How are you going to share your ideas with that audience? (genre)
      • What data will you use to support your claims?
    • Structure (one option)
      • Intro (sources)
      • Claim A (evidence)
      • Claim B (evidence)
      • Claim C (evidence)
      • Conclusion
    • Write an outline.
      • Intro
        • What sources are you going to use? Who do you agree/disagree with?
        • What is your primary argument or thesis?
      • Claims
        • What sub-points are you going to make?
        • What evidence will you use to support these claims?
      • Conclusion
    • Sample outline
      • Intro
        • Bad: Carr
        • Good: Baron (general), Sullivan (audience)
        • Me: good; students are more aware of audience
      • Students plan a lot when writing to audiences they know
        • Evidence: think aloud results
      • Students write for this kind of audience a lot
        • Evidence: survey
      • Students care about what others think when they write online
        • Evidence: interviews
      • Conclusion
        • Professors should encourage students to write for other audiences online, and to be conscious of their online writing habits
    • Share.
      • Trade outlines with someone next to you.
        • How could you improve your outline?
        • Is the order logical?
        • Is there anything you left out or did not consider?
    • Writing an Intro: Swales and the CARS model
      • Establish territory
        • Claim centrality
        • Make a topic generalization
        • Review previous items of research
      • Establish niche
        • Counter-claim
        • Indicate a gap
        • Raise a question
        • Continue a tradition
      • Occupy niche
        • Outline purposes
        • Announce principal findings
        • Indicate research-report structure
    • Establish your territory.
      • Claim centrality
      • Technology is everywhere we look. Children have cell phones; celebrities “tweet” their escapades; politicians use Facebook to promote their campaigns.
      • Review research
      • Recent debates among composition scholars examine the role of technology in the writing classroom.
      Topic generalization Technology has impacted literacy practices for hundreds of years.
    • Establish your territory, cont’d.
      • Review research
      • Technology is everywhere we look. Children have cell phones; celebrities “tweet” their escapades; politicians use Facebook to promote their campaigns. While few could question the omnipresence of technology in our 21st century world, many disagree about the effects that this technology might be having on our literacy.
      • In his playfully skeptical article, “Is Google Making us Stupid?” Nicholas Carr suggests that reading online damages our reading habits. Yet Dennis Baron points out that some of those fears may be unfounded, citing similar skepticism about technologies we now take for granted, like the telephone. Andrew Sullivan also refutes criticisms of technology by pointing out the strong connection he has with the readers of his blog.
    • Establish your niche.
      • Counter-claim
      • Indicate a gap
      • Raise a question
      • Continue a tradition
      • Andrew Sullivan also refutes criticisms of technology by pointing out the strong connection he has with the readers of his blog. Though Sullivan emphasizes the important role that his audience plays for him, he does not fully explore the effect that writing for an audience might have for a student blogger.
    • Occupy your niche.
      • Outline purposes
      • Announce principal findings
      • Indicate research-report structure
      • Andrew Sullivan also refutes criticisms of technology by pointing out the strong connection he has with the readers of his blog.Though Sullivan emphasizes the important role that his audience plays for him, he does not fully explore the effect that writing for an audience might have for a student blogger. I contend that writing online enables students to better connect with an audience, causes students to plan their writing more, and provides a frequent outlet for creativity.
    • Drafting a paragraph
      • Topic sentence (argument)
      • Context
      • Evidence
      • Analysis
      • (repeat)
    • Topic sentence
      • Though many are critical about the supposed lack of thought that students put into their online writing, students actually put more thought into their online writing than one might assume.
        • Connects to overall argument (online writing is good/audience)
        • Gives a summary of the section
    • Context
      • In order to examine students’ thought processes as they write text messages or online posts, we conducted a study in my Composition class. Students spoke all their thoughts out loud as they were writing, and their thoughts were examined for several behaviors, including planning, writing, editing, and unrelated activities.
        • Give the readers enough information to be able to understand the evidence
    • Evidence
      • The results showed that students spent 37% of their composing time engaged in planning activities.
        • Could go into more detail, quote from transcripts, etc.
    • Analysis
      • This high percentage of planning suggests that students’ online writing is not the impulsive, thoughtless prose that some claim it to be. Thus, this kind of writing should be taken more seriously by teachers and scholars.
        • Connect back to argument/claim in topic sentence
    • Repeat.
      • Repeat for each section/paragraph.
      • Share.