Argument as Conversation: The Role of Inquiry in Writing a Researched Argument Stuart Greene
According to Greene, what makes a good question? <ul><li>Open to dispute </li></ul><ul><li>No prepackaged answers (145) </...
Asking good questions <ul><li>Open to dispute </li></ul><ul><li>No prepackaged answers (145) </li></ul><ul><li>Can be answ...
What is framing, according to Greene? <ul><li>“ a metaphor for describing the lens, or perspective, from which writers pre...
<ul><li>Greene suggests that “r e ading necessarily plays a prominent role in the many forms of writing that you do, but n...
<ul><li>Greene writes, “e v ery time you write an argument, the way you position yourself will depend on three things: whi...
<ul><li>How can other people’s texts serve as tools for helping you say more about your own ideas? (151) </li></ul>
<ul><li>Greene differentiates between research as a process of collecting information for the sake of it, and research as ...
<ul><li>Greene claims that “r e search has the potential to change readers’ worldviews and your own” (155). Do you think t...
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Enc1102 greene

  1. 1. Argument as Conversation: The Role of Inquiry in Writing a Researched Argument Stuart Greene
  2. 2. According to Greene, what makes a good question? <ul><li>Open to dispute </li></ul><ul><li>No prepackaged answers (145) </li></ul><ul><li>Can be answered with the tools you have </li></ul><ul><li>Conveys a clear idea of who you are answering the question for </li></ul><ul><li>Organized around an issue </li></ul><ul><li>Explores how, why, whether, the extent to which </li></ul>
  3. 3. Asking good questions <ul><li>Open to dispute </li></ul><ul><li>No prepackaged answers (145) </li></ul><ul><li>Can be answered with the tools you have </li></ul><ul><li>Conveys a clear idea of who you are answering the question for </li></ul><ul><li>Organized around an issue </li></ul><ul><li>Explores how, why, whether, the extent to which (148) </li></ul><ul><li>Did your first paper ask a good question? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you use these guidelines when developing a research question for your semester project? </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is framing, according to Greene? <ul><li>“ a metaphor for describing the lens, or perspective, from which writers present their arguments ” (149). </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s practice framing. </li></ul><ul><li>Start with your argument about literacy and technology. </li></ul><ul><li>Pass to another person. </li></ul><ul><li>Each person takes a slightly different “angle” on the argument or topic </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Greene suggests that “r e ading necessarily plays a prominent role in the many forms of writing that you do, but not simply as a process of gathering information ” (146). In what ways is reading essential to research besides as a process of gathering information? </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Greene writes, “e v ery time you write an argument, the way you position yourself will depend on three things: which previously stated arguments you share, which previously stated arguments you want to refute, and what new opinions and supporting information you are going to bring to the conversation ” (147). Did you do all these things with your first paper? How can this idea help you with your final paper? </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>How can other people’s texts serve as tools for helping you say more about your own ideas? (151) </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Greene differentiates between research as a process of collecting information for the sake of it, and research as a process of discovery and purposeful use of information. Which view of research does he seem to support? Which sounds better/more valuable to you? (155) </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Greene claims that “r e search has the potential to change readers’ worldviews and your own” (155). Do you think this is true? Is it true of the research topics that you’ve been thinking about? </li></ul>
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