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RePRODUCE: an overview
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RePRODUCE: an overview

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This presentation was given as part of the Content in Education Strand on day one of the JISC Digitisation Conference (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/jdcc09). The audio for this presentation can be found here: …

This presentation was given as part of the Content in Education Strand on day one of the JISC Digitisation Conference (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/jdcc09). The audio for this presentation can be found here: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/avfiles/events/2009/06/contentineducation1.mp3 (10mins & 30secs into the audio).

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  • This presentation was given as part of the Content in Education Strand on day one of the JISC Digitisation Conference http://www.jisc.ac.uk/jdcc09 The audio for this presentation can be found here: http://tinyurl.com/ncc4e4 (10mins & 30secs into the audio).
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  • 1. RePRODUCE Programme Content in Education 28/07/09 | | Slide Heather Williamson, JISC eLearning Programme Manager A 12month programme where 20 projects developed and ran quality assured technology enhanced courses using reused and repurposed learning materials sourced externally to their institution. The modules were run with a real cohort of students.  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearningcapital/reproduce
  • 2. some of the lessons learned
    • identification & selection
    • suitability of resources for teaching & learning
    RePRODUCE
    • issues associated with access & licensing
  • 3. identification & selection
    • vast amount of confusion about copyright issues amongst academics – both those who are willing and those who are not willing to share materials.
    • the skills needed to repurpose learning objects may dissuade other institutions from attempting to re-use content
    • definite issue with in-depth quality when it comes to material that is available on a creative commons basis. There isn’t enough of it!
    • lack of clear and consistent standard taxonomies and hierarchies for searching various repositories. Content is often not “what it said on the tin”.
    • On the positive side:
    • sharing content and resources in terms of social learning is growing - for example, the use of sites such as Delicious and Flickr is increasingly common
    RePRODUCE
  • 4.
    •  Intute  Salmon’s ‘E-tivities’ framework  UWE and BATH research
    • observatory
    •  London Pedagogic Planner  National Data Archive  TechDis
    •  X4L  REHASH project  Clinical Skills Online
    •  eViP  JISC’s DesignShare, D4LD and LD4P projects
    •  CETL for Reusable Learning Objects  London Pedagogy Planner
    •  Jorum  repository related projects (Streamline and Persona)
    •  Scottish Film Archive  Len Bird 3 C model to curriculum design
    •  JISC digitisation programme
    28/07/09 | slide selection of the resources used RePRODUCE
  • 5. suitability of resources for teaching & learning
    • while content has to be context-free to be reused, the act of reuse inevitably requires contextualisation.
    • the producer of materials needs to work with both the module in mind AND future external usage
    • For the student a range of views identified:
    • from making no difference:
      • “ prioritising reuse may not result in any significant difference in the learning experience from the student perspective”
    • to a potentially negative impact:
      • “ if students are ‘spoon-fed’ content resources or RLOs by tutors this could lead to the students not developing their own self-directed learning skills”.
    RePRODUCE
  • 6. issues associated with access & licensing
    • RePRODUCE projects often found it challenging to clear rights from other UK universities and public sector organisations
    • rights status of content created and hosted by is often unclear – staff have moved, lack of policy, lack of documentation
      • gentleman’s agreements vs formal arrangements
    • generally an absence of clear rights statements especially around non-personal educational use
      • ambivalence and opposition to permission for use and re-use
    • identifying people with responsibility and ability to grant permissions and make decisions
    • future work: Open Educational Resources Programme:
    • http://www.jisc.ac.uk/oer
    RePRODUCE