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Report Expectations
Report Expectations
Report Expectations
Report Expectations
Report Expectations
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Report Expectations

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  • 1. Great expectations – what’s in a final report? Ros Smith 06/07/09 | | Slide Joint Information Systems Committee Supporting education and research
  • 2. What’s in a final report?
    • Activity
    • In small groups, discuss the examples on your table and identify good and bad points (20 mins)
      • How easy was it to get the information you needed?
      • What was exemplary?
      • Was anything missing?
      • Is there a right and wrong way to produce a final report?
    • Use a notetaker to record (10 mins) and feed back your findings (20 mins)
    • Collect guidelines (10 mins)
    06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 3. Your guidelines – report content (compiled by workshop participants)
    • A good executive summary is vital
    • Ensure you provide details of main project aims / statement of intent
    • Make it easy to understand for non technical people
    • Include only relevant/items
    • Include what has been learned
    • Make your outputs and findings clear to the reader
    • Repetition of relevant points can be good
    • Good to have concrete examples
    • Include ‘human’ elements e.g. quotes – as a break from more complex wordy text
    • Avoid
      • Acronyms
      • Lots of needless detail
      • Too much detail about project planning
      • Waffle. Keep to the point!
      • Poor quality diagrams
    06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 4.
    • Avoid density of information
    • Consider length of report (too short can mean not enough info vs an off-putting thesis!)
    • Clear layout of objectives and activities
    • Make it easy to find key messages
    • Use white space
    • Include a proper table of contents
    • Make use of appendices – keep the report concise and easy to read
    • Highly structured is good
    • Signposts within the document can be helpful
    • Don’t forget to number your pages
    • Ensure pictures/diagrams are properly referenced
    • Bullets or numbered points good
    Your guidelines – report structure (compiled by workshop participants)
  • 5.
    • Think about what the reader can do as a result of your report
    • Get someone outside of the project to read and feedback on your report - the people writing the report generally appear to be too close to the project
    • Ensure your report does not come across as ‘defending’ the project and instead communicates the benefits to other people
    • Take into account DDA (Disability & Discrimination Act) / Accessibility – this benefits everyone
    • Remember that your report may be read on screen
    • Give alternatives for people to read / access it in different ways / on and off screen
    • Tagging topics can be useful
    • Think about longevity
    • Would be good to consider to using other formats when creating their outputs e.g. video, e-learning type tools
    Your guidelines – additional points (compiled by workshop participants)

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