Dissemination
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
747
On Slideshare
746
From Embeds
1
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 1

http://www.slideshare.net 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Publishing and beyond Ros Smith GPI Solutions 06/07/09 | | Slide Joint Information Systems Committee Supporting education and research
  • 2. Introduction 06/07/09 | | Slide Ros Smith – Communications consultant and writer on e-learning Previous work for JISC includes In Their Own Words, Designing Spaces for Effective Learning and Effective Practice with e-Learning [email_address]
  • 3. Publishing and beyond
    • Explore ways of publishing and disseminating project outcomes to maximum effect via the web and other media
    • Work towards guidelines on accessible and user-friendly publishing of project reports and other outcomes
    • Draw out key points from the collective experience of project teams
    06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 4. Defining dissemination
    • Communication - “the act or process of communicating”
    • Dissemination – “the action of scattering or spreading…dispersion, diffusion”
    • Dissemination is more strategic? Strategic communication?
    • Adapted from Using technology for project communication – Netskills (2007) www.netskills.ac.uk/content/projects/jisc-project-comms/
    06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 5. What will effective dissemination do for us? 06/07/09 | | Slide
    • The work of the Programme needs to:
    • Reach its target audiences
    • In ways that:
      • Inform with clarity and precision
      • Promote best practice for others
      • Inspire further research
      • Provide opportunities for adaptation and re-use in local contexts
      • Make a difference to the post 16 and higher education sector
  • 6. How does JISC disseminate project outcomes?
    • On the web
      • Project web pages; news items and articles e.g. JISC inform, podcasts and conference presentations e.g. Innovating e-Learning 2008. See www . jisc.ac.uk/elpconference08
      • e-Learning Focus website – news, articles and features aimed at learning technologists, developers and IT managers. See www.jisc.ac.uk/elearningfocus
      • Online resources e.g. infoKits, downloadable resources e.g. guidelines and publications in PDF and Word formats, video case studies, databases of outputs
      • Web access to CD-ROM content
    06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 7. How does JISC disseminate project outcomes?
    • In print and face-to-face
      • Publications plus downloadable resources on CD-ROM distributed throughout the UK post 16 and HE sector e.g. In Their Own Words, DeL Regional Pilot Stories
      • Briefing papers
      • Presentations and workshops at the JISC Conference
      • Raising the profile of the project outcomes through presentations at conferences and symposia, and journal articles for other agencies e.g. ALT, CETIS, UCISA, HEA
    06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 8.
    • JISC
    • Colleagues
    • Researchers
    • Developers
    • Institutional managers
    • Practitioners
    • Others (unknown)
    Who are your audience?
  • 9. Disseminating via the web 06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 10. Readability
      • Currently, some JISC project web pages demonstrate:
      • Text-heavy page layout
      • Emphasis on aims and background information rather than awareness of audience needs
      • Difficulties in locating downloadable resources
      • Reports and appendices in one file – issues for printing out and/or reading on-screen
      • Accessibility issues for users of screen readers in some features of reports
    06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 11. Is there another way?
    • One overarching page leading to dedicated web page per project
    • Consultation with your team on 3 key points to highlight in the introduction
    • Clear, precise, non-academic text, with guidance on how to access deliverables
    • Final report in separate downloadable sections (accessible PDF and /or Word formats, or PDF + text-only Word version)
    • Option of downloading report as one document if required (accessible PDF or Word)
    06/07/09 | | Slide Breakdown of final report Executive summary Section 1 e.g. methodology Section 2 Section 3 Section 4 Appendix A Appendix B etc
  • 12. Is there another way?
    • A checklist of guidance needed so that we are all working to the same standards and approaches eg:
      • splitting up long reports to accommodate different types of readers with different agendas and requirements
      • adhering to accessibility guidelines for Word, PowerPoint and PDF files now published by TechDis
      • addressing a wider audience via helpful instructions and choices of formats
      • allowing those with deeper interest in the research to find this within the body of the reports
    06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 13. Get prepared now
    • ‘ It is important to ensure that when writing a document accessibility is taken into consideration from the outset.’ Accessibility Essentials 2 (TechDis 2006)
    • Accessible PDF formatting. For guidance on making PDFs accessible - see Accessibility Essentials 4 (TechDis 2007) www.techdis.ac.uk/index.php?p=3_20
    • Providing text-only document in Word alongside an unformatted PDF. For guidance on making Word documents accessible – see Accessibility Essentials 2 (TechDis 2006) www.techdis.ac.uk/resources/sites/accessibilityessentials2/index.html
    • Providing transcripts for video and audio files See http://wb2.northampton.ac.uk/e4l/
    06/07/09 | | Slide
  • 14. Get prepared now
    • Status information should accompany each item e.g. image consent forms, copyright clearance
    • Copyright and IPR clearance will be needed where others’ work is included eg in Web 2.0 resources
    • Individuals’ identities, log-ins, passwords and commercial logos should be obscured in digital images/video clips and consent forms added
    • Transcripts are needed for video clips and alternative text on embedded images
    • Details of file size and type needed where links are provided to content on your own website
    06/07/09 | | Slide If final deliverables include materials additional to a final report, e.g. video clips, audio files, items with large file sizes, or from other sources, be aware of these points
  • 15. Example 06/07/09 | | Slide Sorry, not available for copyright reasons
  • 16. Templates 06/07/09 | | Slide
    • You are not on your own! Templates developed by JISC-funded projects are available to help. These include documents devised for:
      • Transcripts of multimedia resources
      • Participant consent (video and stills images, screen shots, quotations)
      • Case study visits
    • See www.jisc.ac.uk/casestudyguidelines
  • 17. Recommendations
    • Be selective about the items you include to accompany reports. Check these for potential ethical, IPR, copyright and accessibility issues, as well as relevance and quality
    • Consider providing items with a status profile giving information on consent, copyright clearance, copyright statement appertaining to re-use, as well as keywords
    • A useful resource to help check content generated via Web 2.0 tools www.web2rights.org.uk/diagnostic.html
    • Ask for expert guidance on accessibility from TechDis. Also from www.jisc.ac.uk/casestudyguidelines
    • Sharing approaches between teams can be a useful first step to achieving effective external communication. For example, teams producing similar outputs could share and refine the most effective ways of presenting their deliverables as a cluster
    06/07/09 | | Slide