Hearing and Balance Centre: 2011 Hearing Awareness Week - Accessing Captions for Information and Entertainment
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Hearing and Balance Centre: 2011 Hearing Awareness Week - Accessing Captions for Information and Entertainment

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Call or visit one of our clinics:

Darlinghurst Centre
St Vincent's Hospital
Victoria St
Darlinghurst NSW 2010
Ph: 1300 134 327
Fax: (02) 8382 3092

Double Bay Centre
4/5 Goldman Lane
(Between Knox St and Knox Lane)Double Bay NSW 2038
Ph: (02) 9327 3908
Fax: (02) 8382 3092

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  • Access to media through technology empowers people to be independent, gain knowledge, make their own choices, and be active members of our society. We promote inclusion by providing expert knowledge and advice on existing and emerging mainstream technologies to government, industry, educators, consumer organisations and individuals . We work as a catalyst for change in areas of access that include television, DVD, cinema, the arts, education, computing and the Internet, with a primary focus on people who are blind or vision impaired, or Deaf or hearing impaired.

Transcript

  • 1. Anne McGrath
    • Education Manager
    CAPTIONS INFORMATION & ENTERTAINMENT
  • 2. ABOUT MEDIA ACCESS AUSTRALIA
    • Australia’s only independent not-for-profit organisation devoted to increasing access to media for people with disabilities
    • Provide expert knowledge and advice on existing and emerging mainstream technologies
    • Work as a catalyst for change in multiple areas of access
    Sourcing Captions
  • 3. MEDIA ACCESS AUSTRALIA
    • are committed to increasing the awareness of captioning and audio description for:
      • Television
      • DVDs and videos
      • Cinema
      • Theatre performances
      • Exhibitions
      • Other media
      • Educational settings
    • Services
    Sourcing Captions
  • 4. MEDIA ACCESS AUSTRALIA
    • MAA was formerly known as the Australian Caption Centre
    • The captioning and other operations of the former Australian Caption Centre were sold to Red Bee Media in 2006 and still operate under that name as a separate organisation
    • Based in Sydney with a satellite office in Perth
    • Works in collaboration with consumer organisations, Government and industry across the country
    • Background
    Sourcing Captions
  • 5. WHAT IS CAPTIONING?
    • Captioning is a transcription of the audio elements of a TV program, movie, DVD, performance or other media, giving access for people who are deaf or have a hearing impairment
    • Unlike subtitles, captions include song lyrics, descriptions of sound effects and music, and are often positioned and coloured so as to make it easier for the viewer to identify who is speaking.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 6. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN OPEN CAPTIONS AND CLOSED CAPTIONS?
    • Closed captions are selected as desired usually by turning the captions function on or off
    • Open captions automatically appear on a screen
    Sourcing Captions
  • 7. ABOUT CAPTIONING
    • Captions provide information on music and sound effects
    • Subtitles are a translation of a foreign language into English which appears on the bottom of the screen.
    • Colouring and positioning which indicate different speakers.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 8. TYPES OF CAPTIONS
    • Blocks of text
    • Synchronised with the soundtrack
    • Correct grammar, punctuation and spelling
    • They should not be too fast to read
    • They should describe music and sound effects
    • Prepared captions
    Sourcing Captions
  • 9. TYPES OF CAPTIONS
    • Should not block people’s mouths or other important information on the screen
    • This example would require a complaint to be made
    • Prepared captions
    Sourcing Captions
  • 10. TYPES OF CAPTIONS
    • There is always a time lag
    • Quality depends on experience of captioner, quality of equipment, and preparation time
    • Live captions are usually verbatim
    • Live captions
    Sourcing Captions
  • 11. TYPES OF CAPTIONS
    • Written as the program goes to air
    • Appear one word at a time
    • Scroll up the screen as each line is filled
    • Live captions
    Sourcing Captions
  • 12. ACCESSING CAPTIONED ENTERTAINMENT
  • 13. WHAT PROGRAMS ARE CAPTIONED?
    • Captions are available on all TV programs shown between 6.00pm-10.30pm, and all news and current affairs programs, on the primary channels of all free-to-air networks (ABC1, SBS1, Seven, Nine and Ten and also regional channels). Many programs are also captioned outside of prime time.
    • Digital multichannels (e.g. ABC2, ABC3, SBS2, 7Two, One HD and GO!) must screen captioned programs that are repeated from a network’s primary channel, if they were originally captioned
    Sourcing Captions
  • 14. DIGITAL & ANALOG TELEVISION
    • Analog televisions
    • Older televisions which are soon to become redundant with the roll-out of digital television. Analog televisions can only display captions if they have a text button
    • Digital televisions
    • Televisions currently available to buy from retailers. These operate via different technology to analog televisions and offer a wider range of channels.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 15. DIGITAL TV
    • Digital television is a replacement technology for free-to-air analog services, and exists in most areas of Australia.
    • Digital set-top boxes can be connected to any TV to display captions. Digital set-top boxes are not prone to interference, so the captions are usually much clearer and do not suffer drop-outs or jumbled words
    • Digital set-top boxes can display captions with various fonts, colours and sizes. Ask in the shop to see the text of different boxes to find one suitable for you.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 16. HOW DO I GET CAPTIONS ON A DIGITAL TV OR DIGITAL SET-TOP BOX?
    • There will often be a button on the remote control which activates the captions
    • This may be labelled ‘subtitle’ or ‘sub-t’, ‘cc’ (for closed captions), have a TV symbol with a line at the bottom of it, or it may simply be a coloured button
    • In some models, captions can be activated by going into the ‘set-up’ menu
    Sourcing Captions
  • 17. DIGITAL TV
    • Recording programs
      • With a digital set-top box you can connect to any VCR or DVD recorder and record captioned programs. (You cannot do this straight from an analog / teletext television to a VCR or DVD.)
      • Many hard disk recorders and personal video recorders (PVRs) record captions straight to the hard disk, like a computer drive. These are more expensive but have lots of added features.
    • Purchasing
      • Digital set-top boxes range in price from $100 - $1,600 and are available from any electrical retailer. Make sure you tell the salesperson you want one that shows captions!
    Sourcing Captions
  • 18. HOW DO I GET CAPTIONS ON AN ANALOG (TELETEXT) TELEVISION
    • If you are still using an analog television:
    • Choose the channel you wish to watch
    • Press the text button on the remote control. A black strip will appear at the top of the screen
    • Press 8-0-1. This will reveal page 801 and captions will be superimposed over the TV picture. You may need to wait a few seconds for the teletext system to turn to page 801
    • To turn the captions off, you need to press the text button again
    • To change channels, you will need to turn the captions off, change the channel, then turn the captions back on again on the new channel
    Sourcing Captions
  • 19. ABC IVIEW
    • Various programs shown on ABC are available online for a couple of weeks after broadcast e.g. Behind the News
    • http :// www.abc.net.au/iview
    Sourcing Captions
  • 20. CAPTIONS ON DVD
    • The level of captioning on new release DVD rentals has been stable around the 55 – 58% mark since 2006.
    • For DVDs which are captioned:
    • Turn captions on by visiting the ‘set-up’ or ‘features’ menu from the DVD’s main menu.
    • Alternatively, if your DVD remote has a ‘subtitle’ button, you should be able to press this repeatedly until captions appear on screen.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 21. ACCESSIBLE CINEMA
    • Media Access Australia is involved in the expansion of accessible cinema
    • A number of cinemas now offer sessions with captions or audio description
    • Specific information about which cinemas are offering these services and when they’re available can be found at: http://www.yourlocalcinema.com.au/
    Sourcing Captions
  • 22. HOW CAPTIONED CINEMA WORKS
    • Captioned cinema in Australia currently operates on two systems: the open captioned system and the closed captioned system. 
    • All major cinema chain locations (Hoyts, Village, Event/Greater Union/Birch Carroll & Coyle, and Reading) are part of the Federal Government's ‘Cinema Access Implementation Plan’ and have or will switch to the closed caption system (see next slide.) 
    • Open captions
    • Open captions are pre-recorded for the movie and added to a separate disc, like a CD-Rom, that is played at the same time as the movie. 
    • With this system, all audience members can see the captions. This system is in use in a number of independent cinemas nationally and some major cinema chain locations.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 23. HOW CAPTIONED CINEMA WORKS CONTINUED
    • Closed captions
    • Closed captions for cinema in Australia are currently delivered via CaptiView units.
    • CaptiView allows patrons to privately view captions on a personal screen, placed in the cupholder of the cinema seat and adjusted to the perfect viewing position for each individual user.
    • A closed captioned system allows cinemas to offer a number of captioned movies per week, and offer many more sessions all times of the day.
    Sourcing Captions NB: Patrons need to collect a CaptiView unit on arrival at the cinema. Please visit the box office to request a unit. Each cinema has a security system in place to ensure the safe return of equipment.
  • 24. NSW CINEMAS WITH SOME CAPTIONED SESSIONS
    • Hoyts, Chatswood Westfield
    • Hoyts, Broadway
    • Event Cinemas, Top Ryde
    • Event Cinemas, Parramatta
    • Reading Cinemas, Charlestown
    • Hoyts, Warrawong
    • Hoyts, Erina
    • Hoyts, Tweed Heads
    • Greater Union, Glendale
    Sourcing Captions
  • 25. THEATRE CAPTIONING
    • A number of major Australian theatre companies caption some performances each season. For a full list visit Media Access Australia’s website: www.mediaaccess.org.au
    • At captioned theatre performances, screens are generally placed somewhere on the proscenium arch, but may also be integrated into the production's set.
    • The captions can also benefit hearing theatre patrons, especially when the performance involves dialects or strong accents, when words are being sung, or when actors are speaking and singing off-stage.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 26. SYDNEY THEATRES WITH SOME CAPTIONED PERFORMANCES
    • Sydney Theatre, Walsh Bay
    • Sydney Opera House
    • Glen St Theatre, Belrose
    • Upstairs Belvoir Theatre, Surry Hills
    • If your favourite theatre doesn't currently offer captioning, ask at the box office when they will begin to offer the service.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 27. QUESTIONS?
  • 28. Anne McGrath
    • Education Manager
    • [email_address]
    • (02) 9212 6242
  • 29. NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA
    • Allows users to:
      • search for captioned titles Australia wide
      • find the nearest available title
      • organise an inter-library loan
      • http :// trove.nla.gov.au/music/result?q&l-format=Video%2FCaptioned
    • Search engine (Trove)
    Sourcing Captions
  • 30. FINDING CAPTIONED CONTENT ON YOUTUBE
    • Enter the desired subject matter in the search bar as normal on www.youtube.com
    • When a page of results appears, select ‘search options’ and then ‘closed captions.’ This will then limit the results to only those which are closed captioned.
    • The captions can be turned on or off using the CC button at the bottom of the video.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 31. FINDING CAPTIONED CONTENT THROUGH GOOGLE
    • Visit the Google Video site: http://video.google.com.au/? hl=en&tab=vv
    • Select ‘Advanced video search’
    • Select the box next to ‘search only closed captioned videos’ and enter the desired subject matter in the search bar as normal.
    • The captions can be turned on or off using the CC button at the bottom of the video.
    Sourcing Captions
  • 32. *RECENT NEWS* GOOGLE AUTO-CAPTIONING
    • Google recently announced improvements to their auto-captioning on YouTube videos
    • Users uploading video content to YouTube can download auto-captions. These auto-captions are generated by software which identifies voices and matches these to a bank of known sounds and words.
    • This technology is still being refined, but the current version is said to be 20% more accurate than earlier versions.
    • Source: ‘Say What? Google Works to Improve YouTube Auto-Captions for the Deaf’, Scientific American, http:// ht.ly/5p8Eg
    Sourcing Captions
  • 33. OTHER WAYS TO SOURCE CAPTIONED CONTENT
    • Check television guides:
      • ABCTV: http:// www.abc.net.au/tv/guide
      • FOXTEL: http:// www.foxtel.com.au/TVGuide.aspx
      • (can record using set top box)
    • Visit DVD websites and search for captioned content:
      • www.ezydvd.com.au
      • www.devoteddvd.com.au
      • ABC Shop: http :// shop.abc.net.au/browse/promotion.asp?promoid=28
      • www.michaeldvd.com.au
      • www.atlanticdvd.com.au
    Sourcing Captions
  • 34. DIY CAPTIONING ON THE INTERNET
    • MAA has taken a close look at DIY captioning and has tested Overstream, which offers a much more user-friendly product than many others: http :// www.overstream.net
    • Overstream is a free tool which runs on your web browser and allows you to create caption files for Flash videos (Flash is the format used by many video providers, including Google Video and YouTube).
    • It runs as an Adobe Flash application on your web browser and is very easy to use
    Sourcing Captions