Opening: Health 2.0 Seoul Chapter's First Event
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Opening: Health 2.0 Seoul Chapter's First Event

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The opening speech given by James G. Kim at Health 2.0 Seoul Chapter's first event

The opening speech given by James G. Kim at Health 2.0 Seoul Chapter's first event

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    Opening: Health 2.0 Seoul Chapter's First Event Opening: Health 2.0 Seoul Chapter's First Event Presentation Transcript

    • SEOUL THE FIRST EVENT with KiMES2013 COEX March 24, 2013Consumer Health Startups in Korea09:00 ~ 09:30 / 등록 및 네트워킹09:30 ~ 10:00 / Opening: Health 2.0 Seoul Chapter / 김보람 창립자(Health 2.0 Seoul Chapter)10:00 ~ 10:30 / Consumer Health Startup Trends 2013 / 정지훈 교수(명지병원)10:30 ~ 11:00 / Special Lecture: 친환경시대, Green+Hospital 전략11:00 ~ 11:20 / Smart Patient: 스마트폰 시대 환자들의 새로운 검색, 커뮤니케이션 문화와 대응방안 / 임진석 대표(굿닥)11:20 ~ 11:40 / Casual Health Game - 건강한 강아지 순돌이 / 박재범 대표(휴레이포지티브)11:40 ~ 12:00 / Mobile Wellness Technology, Our Lessons and How We are Changing the World / 정세주 대표(눔)12:00 ~ 12:20 / Cloud 기반의 Animation 설명처방, HiChart / 정희두 대표(헬스웨이브)12:20 ~ 13:00 / Panel Discussion: Consumer Health Startups in Korea / 발표자 외 김정은 교수(서울대학교), 고영하 회장(한국엔젤투자협회)DATE/TIME: March 24, 2013 09:00am - 01:00pmVENUE: COEX Conference Room #308REGISTRATION: http://bit.ly/Health2KiMES
    • SEOUL THE FIRST EVENT with KiMES2013COEX March 24, 2013 James G. Boram Kim
    • Source: Ludwig Gatzke and Markus Angermeier
    • Source: Ludwig Gatzke and Markus Angermeier
    • Web 2.0: O’Reilly’s Core Competencies• Services, not packaged software• Data sources that get richer as more people use them• Trusting users as co-developers• Harnessing collective intelligence• Leveraging the long tail through customer self-service• Software above the level of a single device• Lightweight user interfaces, and development and business models vs. COEX Source: Tim O’Reilly, What is Web 2.0, September, 2005
    • Web 2.0: O’Reilly’s Core Competencies• Services, not packaged software• Data sources that get richer as more people use them• Trusting users as co-developers• Harnessing collective intelligence• Leveraging the long tail through customer self-service• Software above the level of a single device• Lightweight user interfaces, and development and business models vs. COEX Source: Tim O’Reilly, What is Web 2.0, September, 2005
    • Web 2.0: O’Reilly’s Core Competencies• Services, not packaged software• Data sources that get richer as more people use them• Trusting users as co-developers• Harnessing collective intelligence• Leveraging the long tail through customer self-service• Software above the level of a single device• Lightweight user interfaces, and development and business models vs. COEX Source: Tim O’Reilly, What is Web 2.0, September, 2005
    • Web 2.0: O’Reilly’s Core Competencies• Services, not packaged software• Data sources that get richer as more people use them• Trusting users as co-developers• Harnessing collective intelligence• Leveraging the long tail through customer self-service• Software above the level of a single device• Lightweight user interfaces, and development and business models vs. COEX Source: Tim O’Reilly, What is Web 2.0, September, 2005
    • Web 2.0: O’Reilly’s Core Competencies• Services, not packaged software• Data sources that get richer as more people use them• Trusting users as co-developers• Harnessing collective intelligence• Leveraging the long tail through customer self-service• Software above the level of a single device• Lightweight user interfaces, and development and business models vs. COEX Source: Tim O’Reilly, What is Web 2.0, September, 2005
    • Web 2.0: O’Reilly’s Core Competencies• Services, not packaged software• Data sources that get richer as more people use them• Trusting users as co-developers• Harnessing collective intelligence• Leveraging the long tail through customer self-service• Software above the level of a single device• Lightweight user interfaces, and development and business models vs. COEX Source: Tim O’Reilly, What is Web 2.0, September, 2005
    • Web 2.0: O’Reilly’s Core Competencies• Services, not packaged software• Data sources that get richer as more people use them• Trusting users as co-developers• Harnessing collective intelligence• Leveraging the long tail through customer self-service• Software above the level of a single device• Lightweight user interfaces, and development and business models vs. COEX Source: Tim O’Reilly, What is Web 2.0, September, 2005
    • COEX Source: Enoch Choi
    • , the movement, is all about newtechnologies improving health care, including cloud, Web,mobile and sensors. Health 2.0 has three definingcharacteristics:1. Adaptable technology that integrates with the wider cloud and “unplatform” ecosystem2. A focus on the user-experience through design and usability3. The use of data to improve outcomes through intelligent decision-making“... social software and light-weight tools to promote collaboration between ... stakeholders inhealth.” - Jane Sarasohn-Kahn and Matthew Holt“... all the constituents focus on health care value ... for improving the safety, efficiency, and qualityof health care.” - Scott Shreeve“Health 2.0 is participatory healthcare. ...,we the patients can be effective partners in our ownhealthcare ...” - Ted Eytan COEX Source: Health 2.0 Wiki
    • Matthew Holt’s evolving view of a moving target• Personalized search that looks into the long tail, but cares about the user experience• Communities that capture the accumulated knowledge of patients and caregivers; and clinicians -- and explain it to the world• Intelligent tools for content delivery -- and transactions• Better integration of data with content All with the result of patients increasingly guiding their own care COEX Source: Health 2.0 Wiki
    • Health 2.0: User-Generated Healthcare Social Networks Search Tools COEX Source: Matthew Halt
    • Health 2.0: User-Generated Healthcare Social Networks Search Tools COEX Source: Matthew Halt
    • Health 2.0: User-Generated Healthcare Social Networks Search Tools COEX Source: Matthew Halt
    • Health 2.0: User-Generated Healthcare Social Content Networks Search Tools Transaction Data COEX Source: Matthew Halt
    • A Continuum of Health 2.0User-generated Users connect Partnerships to Data driveshealth care to providers reform delivery decisions & discovery COEX Source: Matthew Halt
    • A Continuum of Health 2.0User-generated Users connect Partnerships to Data driveshealth care to providers reform delivery decisions & discovery COEX Source: Matthew Halt
    • A Continuum of Health 2.0User-generated Users connect Partnerships to Data driveshealth care to providers reform delivery decisions & discovery COEX Source: Matthew Halt
    • A Continuum of Health 2.0User-generated Users connect Partnerships to Data driveshealth care to providers reform delivery decisions & discovery JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH Nakamura et al Original Paper Mining Online Social Network Data for Biomedical Research: A Comparison of Clinicians’ and Patients’ Perceptions About Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Treatments Carlos Nakamura1, PhD; Mark Bromberg2, MD, PhD; Shivani Bhargava3, BA; Paul Wicks3, PhD; Qing Zeng-Treitler1, PhD 1 Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States 2 Department of Neurology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States 3 PatientsLikeMe, Cambridge, MA, United States Corresponding Author: Carlos Nakamura, PhD Department of Biomedical Informatics University of Utah Room 5775 HSEB 26 South 2000 East Salt Lake City, UT, 84112-5775 United States Phone: 1 801 213 3357 Fax: 1 801 581 4297 Email: carlos.nakamura@utah.edu Abstract Background: While only one drug is known to slow the progress of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), numerous drugs can be used to treat its symptoms. However, very few randomized controlled trials have assessed the efficacy, safety, and side effects of these drugs. Due to this lack of randomized controlled trials, consensus among clinicians on how to treat the wide range of ALS symptoms and the efficacy of these treatments is low. Given the lack of clinical trials data, the wide range of reported symptoms, and the low consensus among clinicians on how to treat those symptoms, data on the prevalence and efficacy of treatments from a patient’s perspective could help advance the understanding of the symptomatic treatment of ALS. Objective: To compare clinicians’ and patients’ perspectives on the symptomatic treatment of ALS by comparing data from a traditional survey study of clinicians with data from a patient social network. Methods: We used a survey of clinicians’ perceptions by Forshew and Bromberg as our primary data source and adjusted the data from PatientsLikeMe to allow for comparisons. We first extracted the 14 symptoms and associated top four treatments listed by Forshew and Bromberg. We then searched the PatientsLikeMe database for the same symptom–treatment pairs. The PatientsLikeMe data are structured and thus no preprocessing of the data was required. Results: After we eliminated pairs with a small sample, 15 symptom–treatment pairs remained. All treatments identified as useful were prescription drugs. We found similarities and discrepancies between clinicians’ and patients’ perceptions of treatment prevalence and efficacy. In 7 of the 15 pairs, the differences between the two groups were above 10%. In 3 pairs the differences were above 20%. Lorazepam to treat anxiety and quinine to treat muscle cramps were among the symptom–treatment pairs with high concordance between clinicians’ and patients’ perceptions. Conversely, amitriptyline to treat labile emotional effect and oxybutynin to treat urinary urgency displayed low agreement between clinicians and patients. Conclusions: Assessing and comparing the efficacy of the symptomatic treatment of a complex and rare disease such as ALS is not easy and needs to take both clinicians’ and patients’ perspectives into consideration. Drawing a reliable profile of treatment efficacy requires taking into consideration many interacting aspects (eg, disease stage and severity of symptoms) that were not covered in the present study. Nevertheless, pilot studies such as this one can pave the way for more robust studies by helping researchers anticipate and compensate for limitations in their data sources and study design. (J Med Internet Res 2012;14(3):e90) doi:10.2196/jmir.2127 http://www.jmir.org/2012/3/e90/ J Med Internet Res 2012 | vol. 14 | iss. 3 | e90 | p.1 (page number not for citation purposes) XSL• FO RenderX COEX Source: Matthew Halt
    • COEX Source: Pew Internet & American Life Project
    • , the conference series, is the leadingshowcase of the new technologies transforming healthcare across the globe.With conferences in the U.S., Asia, Middle East and Europe, Health 2.0 provides the premieropportunities for connecting IT innovators to established healthcare organizations and investors. COEX
    • Chapters represent the grassrootsof Health 2.0!There is significant work going on in healthcare IT, especially at the local level. Health 2.0 Chaptersare free self-sufficient groups that bring home the benefits of a Health 2.0 conference to a moreaccessible level. Chapter leaders volunteer to help organize these exciting events to bringtogether their local community on a regular basis to network, learn, listen to speakers discussrelevant topics or see the latest demos from local companies. All of these groups serve avaluable role in bringing healthcare system professionals together in a local forum. COEX
    • Like Us! Follow Us! http://www.facebook.com/Health2Seoul @Health2Seoul #H2Seoul COEX
    • We thank our generous partners COEX