• Save
Web 30 and RSS
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Web 30 and RSS

  • 8,323 views
Uploaded on

Presentation at 2009 Middle Tennessee State University Instructional Technology Conference.

Presentation at 2009 Middle Tennessee State University Instructional Technology Conference.

More in: Technology , Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
8,323
On Slideshare
8,169
From Embeds
154
Number of Embeds
14

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
27

Embeds 154

http://localhost 46
http://www.hsewebdesign.org 31
http://moikompas.ru 23
http://www.slideshare.net 23
http://www.slideee.com 7
http://ttxcxcxcxc.blogspot.com 6
http://www.techgig.com 6
http://arkadaskilic.blogspot.com 3
http://www.nofoon.com 2
http://www.linkedin.com 2
https://www.linkedin.com 2
http://mywebcollection.blogspot.com 1
http://www.moikompas.ru 1
http://mywebcollection.blogspot.co.uk 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Web 3.0, the next generation of the WWW, is starting to appear on the horizon. Although it is far from clear what the term will mean, it is expected to include a change to a more semantic, data-driven web. In my presentation I will discuss different directions that are currently mentioned and show examples of applications that already incorporate some of these ideas. The main part of the presenation will focus on the increased use of RSS feeds and mashups, which are a first step towards Web 3.0. Examples of advanced uses of RSS and mash ups in instructional technology will be given and the required procedures will be demonstrated. <br /> <br /> Description: <br /> While we are still in the process to fully incorporate Web 2.0 technology into our classrooms, there is already talk about the next generation of the Web, Web 3.0. Again, as had happened with Web 2.0, there is no clear definition yet for this new version, and it will most likely be an evolutionary change in the way we use the WWW. Currently, the most common expectation is that Web 3.0 will be the \"semantic Web\". This is usually understood to mean a web focused on content and data and less on webpages that are displayed in a browser. In my presentation I will discuss different directions that are currently being discussed and show examples of applications that already incorporate some of these ideas. <br /> <br /> These changes should be positive for instructional technology as they will most likely provide new and better tools for the presentation of information and will allow us to provide even better support for instruction. We already have several tools and technologies that focus on content and its delivery: RSS feeds, tagging of data and mash ups will fit into the next generation of Web tools as well. <br /> <br /> In the main part of the presentation I will focus on RSS feeds and mash ups as tools to enrich our instruction. Many of us are using blogs in our professional lives, however RSS feeds, which can be easily created are rarely used to their full potential. I will demonstrate how they can become an important component of our instructional toolset as well as the source for powerful mash ups, which integrate the content of your material with other resources such as maps, images, news, and video. During the presentation I will show how such advanced content presentations can be created using a visual approach: All of the software giants such as Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, and Adobe are making easy-to-use mash up editors available for free. Examples and a demonstration will conclude the presentation. <br /> <br /> Audience: <br /> faculty, librarians, instructional technology specialists, lab directors, general <br /> <br /> Audience level: All <br /> <br /> Requirements: Projector, Internet connection <br /> <br />
  • <br />
  • http://bradfitz.com/social-graph-problem/ <br /> <br /> http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2007/11/10/what-is-social-graph-executives/ <br /> <br /> http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/social_graph_concepts_and_issues.php <br /> <br />
  • http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2007/11/10/what-is-social-graph-executives/ <br />
  • http://www.dopplr.com <br />
  • http://web2.socialcomputingmagazine.com/the_social_graph_issues_and_strategies_in_2008.htm <br />
  • http://wiki.foaf-project.org/FAQ <br /> <br />
  • http://www.oreillynet.com/xml/blog/2007/10/foaf_from_linkedin.html <br />
  • http://xml.mfd-consult.dk/foaf/explorer/ <br /> Check out one of the 'example neighborhoods from foaf explorer. <br /> Use Semantic Radar in Safari to check the foaf file of a livejournal site, like lions and lambs <br />
  • <br />
  • http://opensocialweb.org/2007/09/05/bill-of-rights/ <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • http://informationarchitects.jp/ia-trendmap-2007v2/, with web version indicator. <br /> 2008 map http://informationarchitects.jp/start/ <br />
  • <br />
  • Web page for web 3.0 conference (http://www.web3event.com/): <br /> The Web 1.0 concept was simple: web pages linking to web pages. Then came Web 2.0 - a powerful movement from web pages to web applications. Web 2.0 applications have evolved into often slick viewports into proprietary or personal collections of information. This means they still primarily house data in silos inaccessible to and disconnected from the larger world, and most importantly, from each other. <br /> But as we approach 2009, the clear outlines of the new web are forming. Some call this next generation the Semantic Web, but we think that term is confining, and so, instead, we refer to it as simply Web 3.0. <br /> The new web is moving beyond connecting pages to interconnecting data objects, concepts, and things. Ultimately Web 3.0 is really about creating technology that more accurately mirrors how we see and think about the world around us. <br /> <br /> Explaining Web 1.0, Web 2.0 & Web 3.0 (http://www.resourcefulidiot.com/2008/05/explaining-web-10-web-20-web-30) <br /> Conceptual, Miscellaneous, Web 2.0 <br /> May 9th, 2008 <br /> <br /> It seems that everyone has their own idea of what Web 2.0 means.That is one of the pitfalls to using a single buzzword to define everything you see on the internet. I have heard people describing nearly every new website as being Web 2.0 as if it was describing the launch date of a site. The term ironically is the most popular category on Resourceful Idiot. In leu of this, I am going to finally give you the definition of Web 2.0 and the principles that define it. In order to do that however, I need to start from the beginning with Web 1.0. <br /> <br /> You can group each of the “Web x.x” as a different movement when it comes to internet usage. Web 1.0 is the movement that took place during the beginning of the internet. <br /> <br /> Think AOL, Geocities, and Netscape. <br /> Back then the primary use of the internet was taking print media and posting it online. Web 1.0 saw books, news, music and everything else being moved into a digital format. This movement is still going on and will probably never stop. This is because as new data becomes available it needs to be made available online, but the majority of the community has shifted focus toward data integration since there is not much innovation remaining in posting data online. <br /> Now that brings us to Web 2.0. Many think that this is the current movement of the internet, and in some ways you are correct. After all this data was posted online with the Web 1.0 movement, the online community began to look for ways to share all of this data. The main question that drove this movement, “How can I take this data and share it with other people?” Since this question was asked, sites have popped up all over the internet trying to answer this question with different approaches. One of the most adopted solutions involves the idea of social networking. <br /> <br /> Facebook is a popular Web 2.0 site utilizing social networking as a solution <br /> All of these sites, like Facebook, use the concept of a social networking to create a community. Each community member is responsible for contributing information to the rest of the users. Even though social networking is the most popular approach, another prominent approach is the development and utilization of web services. I wrote an article a few weeks ago about different web services and their technologies (REST and SOAP), and I mentioned that the majority of sites you visit have a web service running in the background. These services allow you to integrate data between sites through API’s (Application Programming Interface) such as you see on Flickr and Amazon. RSS/Atom feeds are also products of the Web 2.0 movement. This movement is still very much alive and being actively addressed. <br /> Now to look into the upcoming movements, Web 3.0. It is difficult to define what Web 3.0 will be as you cannot define something that has yet to occur on a large scale. The best way I can define what we will see with this movement is the integration of data on the internet. Now that the data is online thanks to Web 1.0 and sites can share data through API’s and social networks (Web 2.0), the next obvious direction is to do something with this massive amount of data we have available. A common way of describing this is the use of internet as a platform. With Web 3.0 applications we will see the data being integrated and applying it into innovative ways that were never possible before. Imagine taking things from Amazon, integrating it with data from Google and then building a site that would define your shopping experience based on a combination of Google Trends and New Products. This is just a random (possibly horrible) example of what Web 3.0 applications will harness. An illustration would be to draw nodes to represent all the sites on the internet and then draw a new node. Draw lines from all those existing nodes into the one you just created. The consumption and presentation of the data is what Web 3.0 will potentially be. <br /> The definitions of Web x.x terms is highly debatable. Even when writing this, I was told that technology is what defines Web 2.0. The use of Javascript and AJAX is the “essence” of Web 2.0. However, these technologies have been around since Web 1.0 so obviously this is incorrect. The technologies that have been developed during these phases are simply there to help answer the question in a more accurate way. To prove my point let’s look at history. The guillotine did not define the Enlightenment movement back in the 1700s, the guillotine was developed in response to the questions the Enlightenment movement sought answers for (in this case, “Humane death”). <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • https://www.photoshop.com/express/ <br /> http://www.sliderocket.com/ <br /> http://www.flowgram.com/ <br />
  • https://www.photoshop.com/express/ <br /> http://www.sliderocket.com/ <br /> http://www.flowgram.com/ <br />
  • https://www.photoshop.com/express/ <br /> http://www.sliderocket.com/ <br /> http://www.flowgram.com/ <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • Picture is Darcy Norman’s PLE (http://www.flickr.com/photos/51035644987@N01/2314258583/) <br /> <br /> View http://edtechpost.wikispaces.com/PLE+Diagrams <br />
  • http://www.emc.com/leadership/digital-universe/expanding-digital-universe.htm <br /> Digital universe equaled 281 billion gigabytes of data, or about 45 gigabytes for every person on Earth. <br /> In 2006, the firm said 161 billion gigabytes of data was created, representing “about 3 million times the information in all the books ever written.” <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • TeacherTube channelfeed://www.teachertube.com/chanrss.php?chid=54 <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • http://marshallk.com/get-fed-comparing-3-rss-feed-scraping-tools <br /> <br /> Example for Feed43: http://www.bloomu.edu/today <br /> in Step 2. Define extraction rules, use <br /> Global Search Pattern: <br /> &lt;!-- begin events -->{%}&lt;!-- end events --> <br /> <br /> Item (repeatable) Search Pattern*: <br /> {%} <br /> <br /> Item Title template: {%1} Delta Phi Epsilon <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • RSS feeds used for a page mashup <br /> <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • Mashups combine content or data from different web sites into new applications. <br /> Middleware written in a server side language (or flash or JS) combines the data into a web page that is displayed by the browser. <br /> Mashup editors/engines (Google mashup editor, MS Popfly,...) can also serve this purpose. <br />
  • <br />
  • This Pipe takes the New York Times homepage, passes it thru Content Analysis and uses the keywords to find Photos at Flickr. <br />
  • Rich mashup with live weather, forecasts, webcams, and more on a Google Map. Also location awareness using IP address. <br />
  • IP -- FIRST TIME to FindNearBy.Net? HERE'S HOW TO START SEARCHING:: FindNearby.net gives you unique, 1-search coverage of more than 300+ vendors, including Amazon, eBay and Craiglist + MANY OTHERS. Furthermore, for eBay and Craigslist, FindNearby.net helps you get great stuff NEAR HOME by mapping items that match your queries relative to a ZIP CODE or LOCATION NAME you provide (TOP: \"...to Where?\"). This is especially useful for heavy things like cars, appliances, furniture, etc., because of shipping costs, logistics, and your wanting to SEE IT BEFORE YOU BUY IT. To get started, enter a Search Term (TOP: \"What Do You Want?\") and press the \"Search\" button (TOP: RIGHT). Plese see \"SAVVY SEARCHES\" just below for tips on how to get the best results from each search you make. RESULTS are shown BY VENDOR CATEGORY on your left (TOP: LEFT, TABS). There also please note both a SCROLLER (up/down) and a PAGE TURNER (top) in those results. SORTS may be changed and toggled by clicking the CRITERIA (white, italics text). CRITERIA will changed, depending on VENDOR SOURCE (current active LEFT TAB). <br /> TIP -- TRY YOUR OWN, CUSTOM, LINKS to FindNearBy.Net! Examples: (1) http://findnearby.net/27514/ipod/200 finds all \"ipod\" matches within 200 miles of ZIP 27514; (2) http://findnearby.net/new_york_ny/ipod/100 finds all \"ipod\" matches within 100 miles of New York, N.Y. (see \"Search within Cities and States\" for valid names that can be used with underscores instead of spaces as with the example shown); (3) The syntax, slightly changed, also works for other Neighborhoods. For example, for autosnearby.net: http://autosnearby.net/10001/toyota/camry/100 finds all Camrys within 100 miles of the 10001 zip code. Or http://autosnearby.net/27514/Honda/Honda/3500, which finds all Honda motorcycles in the country. PLEASE NOTE that the following url is the same: http://motorcyclesnearby.net/27514/Honda/%20/3500 (note escape-20). Distances may be one of 25, 50, 100, 200, 3500 (aka Don't Care). <br /> TIP -- HOW TO MAKE 'SHORTLISTS' BEFORE YOU BUY: (1) Perform a search--then scroll & click interesting items from 300+ vendors (LEFT: TABS & ROWS). (2) Your clicks become YOUR SHORTLIST, opening as Tabs (L to R, ABOVE). (3) Use Your Free, My Finds Tools (PRESENTED WHEN YOU CLICK 'VIEW ITEM...') to get the BEST DEAL! <br /> TIP -- HOW TO MAKE SAVVY SEARCHES: First, the start-up search illustrates how the site works as it loads. Note that its results are sorted by Price, not Distance by default (TOP-LEFT, \"Sort:\"). To see \"nearby\" items first, simply click \"Distance\" as your sort. From there, following are some tips to get the most from your time: (1) Start with a single, seemingly-potent BRAND keyword (e.g. a brand like 'samsung') and try a search. (2) Scan quickly through the results, LEFT: TABS (Vendors) & ROWS (Result Items). NOTE: some LEFT tabs let you filter results by 'Favorite Brands'. (3) If there's too much clutter, consider four things: (A) Use operators to restrict the search (e.g. if you want a subzero-rated sleeping bag, not a refrigerator: 'subzero+-refrigerator'. NOTE: use '+\" to join multiple terms (no spaces) and a '-' should you wish to EXCLUDE a term, in the example, 'refrigerator'; (B) For eBay, try 'Browsing by Location & Category' (TOP: Below Search Term Input Box); (C) For (eBay, Craigslist), reduce the value for \"How Close?\" (e.g., from 'Don't Care' to '100mi'); (D) Specifying a 'Category' until you're well into refining your results can limit you greatly. LASTLY, and especially for \"Name Brand Stores,\" using a search like \"Apple Macbook+Pro\" (note there IS a space) will translate into a SPLIT-search of Apple (the manufacturer, which must be ther first term) and Macbook+Pro (the product). Another example with negation: \"samsung hdtv+-plasma\" (Samsung, the manufacturer; hdtv's that are not plasma). Also, you may USE NAMES FOR LOCATIONS, but only in this format: Boston MA. LASTLY, you may search by EBAY ITEM ID or AMAZON ITEM ID. <br /> Bookmarking your \"My Finds\" can be done several ways: (1) To link to the control panel for My Finds: http://findnearby.net/?d=myfinds; (2) To link to a specific query--this can be done a number of ways, e.g.: http://findnearby.net/27514/ipod; (3) To manage your account settings: http://findnearby.net/?d=emailsettings <br /> <br />
  • Mashup combining Google maps, Amazon, eBay, Craigslist, local businesses <br />
  • http://www.mibazaar.com/nationundersiege/index.html <br />
  • http://www.programmableweb.com/ <br />
  • <br />
  • API (Application Programmers Interface) <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • http://www.openkapow.com <br />
  • http://pipes.yahoo.com/pipes/pipe.info?_id=6760b8207ad44fd8eb70fdbd7fbc840e <br />
  • <br />
  • Example: Entries on 'Second Life' in blogs 'http://feeds.feedburner.com/LCB', 'http://feeds.feedburner.com/KappNotes', and http://feeds.chronicle.com/chronicle/wiredcampus <br /> 1. Create a new pipe <br /> 2. Drag a 'Fetch Feed' module from the 'Sources' to the design. <br /> 3. Enter the URL of the RSS feed in the URL box of the module. <br /> 4. Connect the Feed module to the 'Pipe output' module. <br /> 5. Save and Run the pipe. <br /> 6. Add more feed URLs to the Fetch Feed module (or add more 'Fetch Feed' modules and use the 'Union' operator). <br /> 7. Drag a 'Filter' module from the 'Operators' section on the stage <br /> 8. Connect the Fetch Feed module to the input of the Filter module and the output of the Filter module to the Pipe output module. <br /> 9. Add rules and modify settings of the Filter module, e.g.item.description contains second life. <br /> 10. Save and run again. <br /> <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • Main statements: (2007) <br /> - web 2.0 is a marketing term <br /> - web 3.0 does not exist yet <br /> - web 2.0 is Ajax <br /> - web 3.0 will be small applications with data in the cloud,... <br /> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0QJmmdw3b0 <br />
  • <br />
  • Just because there is web 2.0 does not mean there has to be/will be a web 3.0. <br /> Why not web 2.1? <br /> First significant entries in 2006 <br />
  • Great slideshow: http://www.slideshare.net/ricmac/web-technology-trends-for-2008-and-beyond/v1?src=embed <br /> Transcript: <br /> Slide 1: What’s Next on the Web? Web Technology Trends for 2008 and Beyond Presented by: Richard MacManus, Editor, ReadWriteWeb <br /> Slide 2: • http://www.readwriteweb.com • Daily coverage of Web Technology news, trends & products • Lead blog in RWW Network; others are Last100 (digital lifestyle), AltSearchEngines (search), ReadWriteTalk (podcast show) • ReadWriteWeb is #13 on Technorati Top 100, #5 on Techmeme Leaderboard • Founder & Editor: Richard MacManus • RWW team: Alex Iskold, Marshall Kirkpatrick, Josh Catone, Sarah Perez, Emre Sokullu, Bernard Lunn, Steve O’Hear & Dan Langendorf (last100), Charles Knight (ASE), Sean Ammirati (RWT) <br /> Slide 3: Web 2.0 • Read/Write, two-way, anyone can be a publisher • Social Web • The term “Web 2.0” defines an era; like “Dot Com” • Search (Google, Alternative Search Engines) • Social Networks (MySpace, Facebook, OpenSocial) • Online Media (YouTube, Last.fm) • Content Aggregation / Syndication (Bloglines, Google Reader, Techmeme, Topix) • Mashups (Google Maps, Flickr, YouTube) Image credit: catspyjamasnz <br /> Slide 4: What’s Next? (Web 3.0) • Web Sites Become Web Services – “Unstructured information will give way to structured information - paving the road to more intelligent computing.” (Alex Iskold, ReadWriteWeb, Mar 07) – Examples: Amazon E-Commerce API, del.icio.us API, Twitter API, Dapper, Teqlo, Yahoo! Pipes (scraping technologies) – Pages not center of Web now, Data & Services are – 90% of Twitter activity happens through its API • Intelligent Web = data is getting smarter (ref: Nova Spivack, Twine, Oct 07) – Semantic Web – Filters / recommendations – Personalization • Beyond PC - mobile, IPTV, physical world integration <br /> Slide 5: Semantic Web • Machines talking to machines • Making the Web more 'intelligent’ • Tim Berners-Lee: computers \\\"analyzing all the data on the Web‚ the content, links, and transactions between people and computers.” • Bottom Up = annotate, metadata, RDF! • Top Down = Simple Image credit: dullhunk Top-down: • Leverage existing web information • Apply specific, vertical semantic knowledge • Deliver the results as a consumer-centric web app <br /> Slide 6: Semantic Apps What is a Semantic App? - Not necessarily W3C Semantic Web - An app that determines the meaning of text and other data, and then creates connections for users - Data portability and connectibility are keys (ref: Nova Spivack) Example: Calais Reuters, the international business and financial news giant, launched an API called Open Calais in Feb 08. The API does a semantic markup on unstructured HTML documents - recognizing people, places, companies, and events. Ref: Reuters Wants The World To Be Tagged ; Alex Iskold, ReadWriteWeb, Feb 08 <br /> Slide 7: More Semantic Apps Other Products to watch: • Twine • Freeset • Powerset • Talis • TrueKnowledge • AdaptiveBlue • TripIt • Spock • Quintura • Hakia Ref: 10 Semantic Apps to Watch; Richard MacManus, ReadWriteWeb, Nov 07 <br /> Slide 8: Open Data • Data-driven Web • APIs, Portable data • Making data available on the Web via APIs, web services, open data standards • “Data silos and walled gardens are a huge loss of opportunity and more people are figuring that out every day.” Marshall Kirkpatrick, ReadWriteWeb, January 2008 Social Graph • Social networks slowly opening up: OpenSocial / Facebook Platform --> Social Graph --> Custom Social Networks? • Brad Fitzpatrick: \\\"the global mapping of everybody and how they're related”; Ref: Brad Fitzpatrick, Aug 07 • Alex Iskold: “…it will take a lot of work to get a working solution. The challenges are conceptual, technical, political, business and educational.”; Ref: Social Graph: Concepts and Issues; Alex Iskold, ReadWriteWeb, Sep 07 • Tim Berners-Lee: Third main \\\"level\\\" of computer networks (Giant Global Graph): Internet --> Web --> Graph. Ref: RWW, Nov 07 <br /> Slide 9: Open Data: Products & Standards Open Data Products • Google's Android mobile OS; will be available for any phone manufacturer to install and build on top of • Data remix products; e.g. Dapper, Yahoo Pipes • Mashups; e.g. Last.fm mashups use Audioscrobbler - \\\"a massive database that tracks listening habits and calculates relationships and recommendations based on the music people listen to.\\\" • Lifestreaming apps (personal data aggregation and publishing); e.g. Tumblr, Jaiku, Onaswarm, MyBlogLog, FriendFeed Ref: Lifestreaming: a ReadWriteWeb Primer, Jan 08 Open Data Standards • Data portability - taking your data and friends from one site to another. Check out DataPortability.org • OpenID- portable identity; single sign-on • OpenSocial - Google initiative for social networks, enabling developers to create widgets with one set of code; MySpace a member, Facebook isn’t • APML - growing ‘Attention’ standard; Your Attention Data is all the information online about what you read, write, share and consume <br /> Slide 10: Mobile Web • Portable • Location-aware • Integrated with physical world • Always on, always carried, built-in payment model, mobile phone is a creative tool at point of creative impulse, gets the most accurate audience info. (ref: Tomi Ahonen, Oct 07) • Google, Yahoo, Microsoft all ramping up their Mobile Web efforts (e.g. Yahoo Go platform) iPhone • Revolutionary Mobile Web UI (multi-touch) • Runs OS X, Safari = can view full websites in the browser on a mobile phone (not WAP!) • Desktop class applications • Rich HTML emails (competitor to Blackberry) • Ref: Boom! iPhone Rocks Tech World, ReadWriteWeb, Jan 07 <br /> Slide 11: Mobile Web Apps 5 Essential Mobile Web Apps As chosen by RWW readers, Nov 07: • Gmail Java app for mobile phone • Google Maps for Mobile • Opera Mini • Fring (VoIP, IM) • Shozu (send media to Web) Twitter • Best Mobile Start-up, Crunchies Awards 2007 • ReadWriteWeb’s Best Web LittleCo of 2007 • Micro-blogging; mix between blogging and chatting; short updates, “140 characters or less” • Niche now, but potential for mainstream: “It is the coverage of news events and the continued emergence of citizen journalism that will push Twitter toward the mainstream this year.” Josh Catone, ReadWriteWeb, Jan 08 <br /> Slide 12: Recommendation Engines • Given a set of ratings for a particular user, along with those of the whole user base, come up with new items that this user will like • Personalization is driving it 4 Approaches: • Personalized recommendation - recommend things based on the individual's past behavior • Social recommendation - recommend things based on the past behavior of similar users • Item recommendation - recommend things based on the item itself • A combination of the three approaches above Ref: Rethinking Recommendation Engines,Alex Iskold, ReadWriteWeb, Feb 08 <br /> Slide 13: Recommendation Engines - Examples • Amazon, Netflix, last.fm, Pandora, StumbleUpon, del.icio.us are some of the most popular • Last.fm music recommendation community sold to CBS for $280M & StumbleUpon sold to eBay for $75M; both in May ‘07 • Ref: 10 Recommended Recommendation Engines, ReadWriteWeb, Feb 08 MyStrands • Invested $55 million so far • Aims to “to lead the social recommendation industry” • Currently music discovery and social networking site that covers the PC, mobile and physical worlds • Mission: “help people discover new things” • Working on open data formats for describing user taste data; may also use APML? <br /> Slide 14: ReadWriteWeb Resources • What's Next on the Web: a ReadWriteWeb • 2008 Web Predictions • 10 Future Web Trends • 10 More Future Web Trends <br />
  • Does not mention web 3.0, but I would consider two of the technologies part of the web 3.0 era <br />
  • http://wp.nmc.org/horizon2009/ <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • Karl section of presentation. <br />
  • http://www.internet3d.org/ <br /> <br /> Web 3.0 will be 3D-Internet! <br /> Monday, 28th May 2007 <br /> <br />  rich.igg.com <br /> Goooooogle-Anzeigen  <br /> <br /> The future of the internet develops from the common 2D web into a more and more realistic three-dimensional cyberworld. This however is so far still basically unknown to a wider public; but this trend seems unstoppable. At this moment the internet is conquering the virtual threedimensional space. We hardly got used to the term 'Web 2.0' - already 'Web 3.0' knocks at our doors. At least this term will be easy to remember, because… <br /> Web 3.0 will be nothing else than three-dimensional internet.In Web 2.0 we have the possibility to participate in the internet with blogs, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, Digg or Myspace. With Web 3.0 we will do the same thing - but in 3D! The leap from Community Web 2.0 to 3D Web 3.0 will be a quantum jump, which can be compared to the step from book to television. <br /> At this very moment thousands of users worldwide linger in 3D-worlds like Second Life or 3D-games suchs as Entropiauniverse and Activeworlds.These virtual spaces are however just forerunners of a much greater trend. The whole net will become a complete threedimensional world - a virtual parallel-world to real life. These new worlds will be inhabited by so-called avatars. <br /> An avatar is an artificial person or a graphic representative of a person in a virtual world, as for example in a computer game. So it is about a kind of virtual I or we could also call it our alter ego. The word avatar is sanskrit and literally means 'descent' and implies descent of a god into the bodily realms of planet earth. Computer-avatars however represent real people - at least for the time being. In this regard, virtual worlds are more real than certain telephone-hotlines! <br /> Philip Rosedale, founder of Second Life, believes that one day 1'500 million people will have a second existence.Rosedale believes that virtual identities will become as popular as email-addresses and mobile phones. Too daring a prediction? If we consider the fact that 10 years ago in 1997 only a handful of people owned their own email-address, virtual identities for a great part of the population seem very well realistic. <br /> <br /> The adding of the third dimension will shift the internet into a hyper-realistic parallelworld.In the year 2020 it will be difficult to distinguish this computerworld from the real world. A foretaste of this can be seen in the onlineworld  which is currently best-known: Second Life. Luxurious flats on tropical islands…sports like skydiving and skateboarding…virtual campus including teachers and lecture rooms…virtual sex, escort agencies, red-light district, tabledance…purchase and vending of land, real estate, cars, furniture, clothes…3D-chat…and all the rest of it. This and much more can be experienced at this stage! <br /> (www.internet3d.org) <br />
  • http://www.internet3d.org/ <br /> <br /> Web 3.0 will be 3D-Internet! <br /> Monday, 28th May 2007 <br /> <br />  rich.igg.com <br /> Goooooogle-Anzeigen  <br /> <br /> The future of the internet develops from the common 2D web into a more and more realistic three-dimensional cyberworld. This however is so far still basically unknown to a wider public; but this trend seems unstoppable. At this moment the internet is conquering the virtual threedimensional space. We hardly got used to the term 'Web 2.0' - already 'Web 3.0' knocks at our doors. At least this term will be easy to remember, because… <br /> Web 3.0 will be nothing else than three-dimensional internet.In Web 2.0 we have the possibility to participate in the internet with blogs, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, Digg or Myspace. With Web 3.0 we will do the same thing - but in 3D! The leap from Community Web 2.0 to 3D Web 3.0 will be a quantum jump, which can be compared to the step from book to television. <br /> At this very moment thousands of users worldwide linger in 3D-worlds like Second Life or 3D-games suchs as Entropiauniverse and Activeworlds.These virtual spaces are however just forerunners of a much greater trend. The whole net will become a complete threedimensional world - a virtual parallel-world to real life. These new worlds will be inhabited by so-called avatars. <br /> An avatar is an artificial person or a graphic representative of a person in a virtual world, as for example in a computer game. So it is about a kind of virtual I or we could also call it our alter ego. The word avatar is sanskrit and literally means 'descent' and implies descent of a god into the bodily realms of planet earth. Computer-avatars however represent real people - at least for the time being. In this regard, virtual worlds are more real than certain telephone-hotlines! <br /> Philip Rosedale, founder of Second Life, believes that one day 1'500 million people will have a second existence.Rosedale believes that virtual identities will become as popular as email-addresses and mobile phones. Too daring a prediction? If we consider the fact that 10 years ago in 1997 only a handful of people owned their own email-address, virtual identities for a great part of the population seem very well realistic. <br /> <br /> The adding of the third dimension will shift the internet into a hyper-realistic parallelworld.In the year 2020 it will be difficult to distinguish this computerworld from the real world. A foretaste of this can be seen in the onlineworld  which is currently best-known: Second Life. Luxurious flats on tropical islands…sports like skydiving and skateboarding…virtual campus including teachers and lecture rooms…virtual sex, escort agencies, red-light district, tabledance…purchase and vending of land, real estate, cars, furniture, clothes…3D-chat…and all the rest of it. This and much more can be experienced at this stage! <br /> (www.internet3d.org) <br />
  • http://www.internet3d.org/ <br /> <br /> Web 3.0 will be 3D-Internet! <br /> Monday, 28th May 2007 <br /> <br />  rich.igg.com <br /> Goooooogle-Anzeigen  <br /> <br /> The future of the internet develops from the common 2D web into a more and more realistic three-dimensional cyberworld. This however is so far still basically unknown to a wider public; but this trend seems unstoppable. At this moment the internet is conquering the virtual threedimensional space. We hardly got used to the term 'Web 2.0' - already 'Web 3.0' knocks at our doors. At least this term will be easy to remember, because… <br /> Web 3.0 will be nothing else than three-dimensional internet.In Web 2.0 we have the possibility to participate in the internet with blogs, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, Digg or Myspace. With Web 3.0 we will do the same thing - but in 3D! The leap from Community Web 2.0 to 3D Web 3.0 will be a quantum jump, which can be compared to the step from book to television. <br /> At this very moment thousands of users worldwide linger in 3D-worlds like Second Life or 3D-games suchs as Entropiauniverse and Activeworlds.These virtual spaces are however just forerunners of a much greater trend. The whole net will become a complete threedimensional world - a virtual parallel-world to real life. These new worlds will be inhabited by so-called avatars. <br /> An avatar is an artificial person or a graphic representative of a person in a virtual world, as for example in a computer game. So it is about a kind of virtual I or we could also call it our alter ego. The word avatar is sanskrit and literally means 'descent' and implies descent of a god into the bodily realms of planet earth. Computer-avatars however represent real people - at least for the time being. In this regard, virtual worlds are more real than certain telephone-hotlines! <br /> Philip Rosedale, founder of Second Life, believes that one day 1'500 million people will have a second existence.Rosedale believes that virtual identities will become as popular as email-addresses and mobile phones. Too daring a prediction? If we consider the fact that 10 years ago in 1997 only a handful of people owned their own email-address, virtual identities for a great part of the population seem very well realistic. <br /> <br /> The adding of the third dimension will shift the internet into a hyper-realistic parallelworld.In the year 2020 it will be difficult to distinguish this computerworld from the real world. A foretaste of this can be seen in the onlineworld  which is currently best-known: Second Life. Luxurious flats on tropical islands…sports like skydiving and skateboarding…virtual campus including teachers and lecture rooms…virtual sex, escort agencies, red-light district, tabledance…purchase and vending of land, real estate, cars, furniture, clothes…3D-chat…and all the rest of it. This and much more can be experienced at this stage! <br /> (www.internet3d.org) <br />
  • http://www.internet3d.org/ <br /> <br /> Web 3.0 will be 3D-Internet! <br /> Monday, 28th May 2007 <br /> <br />  rich.igg.com <br /> Goooooogle-Anzeigen  <br /> <br /> The future of the internet develops from the common 2D web into a more and more realistic three-dimensional cyberworld. This however is so far still basically unknown to a wider public; but this trend seems unstoppable. At this moment the internet is conquering the virtual threedimensional space. We hardly got used to the term 'Web 2.0' - already 'Web 3.0' knocks at our doors. At least this term will be easy to remember, because… <br /> Web 3.0 will be nothing else than three-dimensional internet.In Web 2.0 we have the possibility to participate in the internet with blogs, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, Digg or Myspace. With Web 3.0 we will do the same thing - but in 3D! The leap from Community Web 2.0 to 3D Web 3.0 will be a quantum jump, which can be compared to the step from book to television. <br /> At this very moment thousands of users worldwide linger in 3D-worlds like Second Life or 3D-games suchs as Entropiauniverse and Activeworlds.These virtual spaces are however just forerunners of a much greater trend. The whole net will become a complete threedimensional world - a virtual parallel-world to real life. These new worlds will be inhabited by so-called avatars. <br /> An avatar is an artificial person or a graphic representative of a person in a virtual world, as for example in a computer game. So it is about a kind of virtual I or we could also call it our alter ego. The word avatar is sanskrit and literally means 'descent' and implies descent of a god into the bodily realms of planet earth. Computer-avatars however represent real people - at least for the time being. In this regard, virtual worlds are more real than certain telephone-hotlines! <br /> Philip Rosedale, founder of Second Life, believes that one day 1'500 million people will have a second existence.Rosedale believes that virtual identities will become as popular as email-addresses and mobile phones. Too daring a prediction? If we consider the fact that 10 years ago in 1997 only a handful of people owned their own email-address, virtual identities for a great part of the population seem very well realistic. <br /> <br /> The adding of the third dimension will shift the internet into a hyper-realistic parallelworld.In the year 2020 it will be difficult to distinguish this computerworld from the real world. A foretaste of this can be seen in the onlineworld  which is currently best-known: Second Life. Luxurious flats on tropical islands…sports like skydiving and skateboarding…virtual campus including teachers and lecture rooms…virtual sex, escort agencies, red-light district, tabledance…purchase and vending of land, real estate, cars, furniture, clothes…3D-chat…and all the rest of it. This and much more can be experienced at this stage! <br /> (www.internet3d.org) <br />
  • http://www.internet3d.org/ <br /> <br /> Web 3.0 will be 3D-Internet! <br /> Monday, 28th May 2007 <br /> <br />  rich.igg.com <br /> Goooooogle-Anzeigen  <br /> <br /> The future of the internet develops from the common 2D web into a more and more realistic three-dimensional cyberworld. This however is so far still basically unknown to a wider public; but this trend seems unstoppable. At this moment the internet is conquering the virtual threedimensional space. We hardly got used to the term 'Web 2.0' - already 'Web 3.0' knocks at our doors. At least this term will be easy to remember, because… <br /> Web 3.0 will be nothing else than three-dimensional internet.In Web 2.0 we have the possibility to participate in the internet with blogs, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, Digg or Myspace. With Web 3.0 we will do the same thing - but in 3D! The leap from Community Web 2.0 to 3D Web 3.0 will be a quantum jump, which can be compared to the step from book to television. <br /> At this very moment thousands of users worldwide linger in 3D-worlds like Second Life or 3D-games suchs as Entropiauniverse and Activeworlds.These virtual spaces are however just forerunners of a much greater trend. The whole net will become a complete threedimensional world - a virtual parallel-world to real life. These new worlds will be inhabited by so-called avatars. <br /> An avatar is an artificial person or a graphic representative of a person in a virtual world, as for example in a computer game. So it is about a kind of virtual I or we could also call it our alter ego. The word avatar is sanskrit and literally means 'descent' and implies descent of a god into the bodily realms of planet earth. Computer-avatars however represent real people - at least for the time being. In this regard, virtual worlds are more real than certain telephone-hotlines! <br /> Philip Rosedale, founder of Second Life, believes that one day 1'500 million people will have a second existence.Rosedale believes that virtual identities will become as popular as email-addresses and mobile phones. Too daring a prediction? If we consider the fact that 10 years ago in 1997 only a handful of people owned their own email-address, virtual identities for a great part of the population seem very well realistic. <br /> <br /> The adding of the third dimension will shift the internet into a hyper-realistic parallelworld.In the year 2020 it will be difficult to distinguish this computerworld from the real world. A foretaste of this can be seen in the onlineworld  which is currently best-known: Second Life. Luxurious flats on tropical islands…sports like skydiving and skateboarding…virtual campus including teachers and lecture rooms…virtual sex, escort agencies, red-light district, tabledance…purchase and vending of land, real estate, cars, furniture, clothes…3D-chat…and all the rest of it. This and much more can be experienced at this stage! <br /> (www.internet3d.org) <br />
  • http://www.internet3d.org/ <br /> <br /> Web 3.0 will be 3D-Internet! <br /> Monday, 28th May 2007 <br /> <br />  rich.igg.com <br /> Goooooogle-Anzeigen  <br /> <br /> The future of the internet develops from the common 2D web into a more and more realistic three-dimensional cyberworld. This however is so far still basically unknown to a wider public; but this trend seems unstoppable. At this moment the internet is conquering the virtual threedimensional space. We hardly got used to the term 'Web 2.0' - already 'Web 3.0' knocks at our doors. At least this term will be easy to remember, because… <br /> Web 3.0 will be nothing else than three-dimensional internet.In Web 2.0 we have the possibility to participate in the internet with blogs, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, Digg or Myspace. With Web 3.0 we will do the same thing - but in 3D! The leap from Community Web 2.0 to 3D Web 3.0 will be a quantum jump, which can be compared to the step from book to television. <br /> At this very moment thousands of users worldwide linger in 3D-worlds like Second Life or 3D-games suchs as Entropiauniverse and Activeworlds.These virtual spaces are however just forerunners of a much greater trend. The whole net will become a complete threedimensional world - a virtual parallel-world to real life. These new worlds will be inhabited by so-called avatars. <br /> An avatar is an artificial person or a graphic representative of a person in a virtual world, as for example in a computer game. So it is about a kind of virtual I or we could also call it our alter ego. The word avatar is sanskrit and literally means 'descent' and implies descent of a god into the bodily realms of planet earth. Computer-avatars however represent real people - at least for the time being. In this regard, virtual worlds are more real than certain telephone-hotlines! <br /> Philip Rosedale, founder of Second Life, believes that one day 1'500 million people will have a second existence.Rosedale believes that virtual identities will become as popular as email-addresses and mobile phones. Too daring a prediction? If we consider the fact that 10 years ago in 1997 only a handful of people owned their own email-address, virtual identities for a great part of the population seem very well realistic. <br /> <br /> The adding of the third dimension will shift the internet into a hyper-realistic parallelworld.In the year 2020 it will be difficult to distinguish this computerworld from the real world. A foretaste of this can be seen in the onlineworld  which is currently best-known: Second Life. Luxurious flats on tropical islands…sports like skydiving and skateboarding…virtual campus including teachers and lecture rooms…virtual sex, escort agencies, red-light district, tabledance…purchase and vending of land, real estate, cars, furniture, clothes…3D-chat…and all the rest of it. This and much more can be experienced at this stage! <br /> (www.internet3d.org) <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • <br />
  • Nova Spivack in http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/the_web/article2726190.ece <br /> But also see impl.emented » Web 3.0 - The Semantic, Implicit, Mobile or Distributed Web? about misunderstandings <br />
  • <br />
  • http://thesemanticway.wordpress.com/2008/11/11/the-semantic-web-an-introduction/ <br />
  • Berners-Lee seems to have used the term semantic web first. <br /> 8-minute interview. <br /> 2001 article in Scientific American <br /> http://www.technologyreview.com/video/semantic <br />
  • http://videolectures.net/training06_sure_stsw/ <br /> http://novaspivack.typepad.com/nova_spivacks_weblog/2006/11/minding_the_pla.html <br /> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGg8A2zfWKg <br /> <br />
  • http://thefigtrees.net/lee/sw/sciam/semantic-web-in-action <br /> Not new technology. <br />
  • http://agraph.franz.com/cresources/index.lhtml <br /> http://www.rdfabout.com/intro/ <br />
  • <br />
  • has searching become easier on the web? <br /> <br /> \"There are fundamentally three big problems with current search, which largely stem from the fact that conventional search engines match words and phrases not meanings. <br /> <br /> First of all, there is the issue of ambiguity. When you type in “Java” do you mean “the programming language”, “a region in Indonesia” or “a cup of coffee”? <br /> <br /> Second of all, you need to guess which search terms to use – you’re looking for a new “car” but it’s also referred to as an “automobile” or a “vehicle” etc. This is in fact the single biggest problem because there are sometimes dozens of different ways of saying the same thing. <br /> <br /> <br /> Google results for search term \"java\" <br /> And lastly, it’s the sheer volume of results that are daunting. A search in Google for “java” yields 412 million results. They can’t all be good. A lot of this is just noise but you often have to sift through mismatched or unacceptable results to get what you want. <br /> <br /> So these then are the first things that semantic search should seek to improve. There are different ways of removing ambiguity – one being by looking at the context around a word or phrase and another to give the user a means of easily being unambiguous. <br /> <br /> Understanding that there are different ways in which people can say the same thing is critical for semantic search. You shouldn’t have to guess the way that the search engine wants you to express yourself, you should have a search engine that understands you the way you naturally think and should do the “heavy lifting” of finding all of the results that match.\" <br /> (http://www.semantifind.com) <br />
  • Test of three search engines for the question: <br /> \"Who is the next president of the united states?\" <br /> http://www.ask.com http://powerset.com http://google.com <br /> Ask.com seems to be better than powerset. <br /> Try \"how far is london from paris?\". Surprisingly, Google is very good also. <br /> <br /> Also check out: http://start.csail.mit.edu/ <br /> <br /> Resource and ideas from http://www.semanticfocus.com/blog/entry/title/natural-language-search-a-new-breakthrough/ <br />
  • Test of three search engines for the question: <br /> \"Who is the next president of the united states?\" <br /> http://www.ask.com http://powerset.com http://google.com <br /> Ask.com seems to be better than powerset. <br /> Try \"how far is london from paris?\". Surprisingly, Google is very good also. <br /> <br /> Also check out: http://start.csail.mit.edu/ <br /> <br /> Resource and ideas from http://www.semanticfocus.com/blog/entry/title/natural-language-search-a-new-breakthrough/ <br />

Transcript

  • 1. RSS feeds and mash-ups: On the way to web 3.0 Middle Tennessee State University - Instructional Technology Conference March 31, 2009 ? 1
  • 2. RSS feeds and mash-ups: On the way to web 3.0 Middle Tennessee State University - Instructional Technology Conference March 31, 2009 ? Web 2.0 1
  • 3. Contact Helmut Doll hdoll@bloomu.edu http://iitweb.bloomu.edu/courses/dollnews/ Twitter: hdoll LinkedIn: hdoll@bloomu.edu Facebook: hdoll@bloomu.edu Slideshare Google: helmutdoll 2
  • 4. Social graphs global mapping of everybody and how they're related many disconnected graphs integrate social identities from web 2.0 sites 3
  • 5. About social graphs representation of our relationships define our personal, family, or business communities on social networking websites information duplicate on social sites difficult to manage and inaccurate 4
  • 6. What do you do with a social graph? Example Plan travel Share with people in your social graph 5
  • 7. What do you do with a social graph? Example Plan travel Share with people in your social graph 5
  • 8. Notes on the social graph might replace the address book who owns your social graph? Open Source software may be an approach to bridge the gaps Social Graph API 6
  • 9. FOAF http://www.foaf-project.org/ RDF Format to make person information and relationships readable by machines Allows searches for questions like 'anybody who lives within 30 miles of me who is also interested in instructional technology' 7
  • 10. Creating a FOAF file Export your linkedIn contact to vCard or Facebook FOAF generator (problems) Create the FOAF file in http://toxi.co.uk/foafgen/generatefoaf.php Or create it using e.g. Foaf-a-matic Result: foaf.rdf 8
  • 11. What do you do with a FOAF file? Post it on your server FOAF harvesters find it Tools like FOAF Explorer can use it Link it in your web page <link rel=quot;metaquot; type=quot;application/rdf+xmlquot; title=quot;FOAFquot; href=quot;foaf.rdfquot; /> Tools with AutoDiscovery, like Semantic Radar for Firefox show the information 9
  • 12. One more tagging idea: XFN also a microformat identify relationship in links <a href=quot;...quot; rel=quot;friend metquot;>...</a> e.g. blogroll in Wordpress http://gmpg.org/xfn/ Interesting application: http://www.rubhub.com 10
  • 13. Bill of Rights for the Social Web? A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web Authored by Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble, and Michael Arrington September 4, 2007 We publicly assert that all users of the social web are entitled to certain fundamental rights, specifically: • Ownership of their own personal information, including: ◦ their own profile data ◦ the list of people they are connected to ◦ the activity stream of content they create; • Control of whether and how such personal information is shared with others; and • Freedom to grant persistent access to their personal information to trusted external sites. Sites supporting these rights shall: • Allow their users to syndicate their own profile data, their friends list, and the data that’s shared with them via the service, using a persistent URL or API token and open data formats; • Allow their users to syndicate their own stream of activity outside the site; • Allow their users to link from their profile pages to external identifiers in a public way; and • Allow their users to discover who else they know is also on their site, using the same external identifiers made available for lookup within the service. 11
  • 14. What is the first term that comes to mind when you hear 12
  • 15. What is the first term that comes to mind when you hear Web 2.0 12
  • 16. 13
  • 17. Which web 2.0 features/sites do you ‘consume’? Blog Wiki Facebook Google Docs YouTube Flickr 14
  • 18. On which web 2.0 features/sites do you ‘contribute’? Blog Wiki Facebook Google Docs YouTube Flickr 15
  • 19. Web Trends 2007 map 16
  • 20. Web 1.0 17
  • 21. Web 2.0 18
  • 22. Some of my favorite RIA https://www.photoshop.com/express/ http://www.sliderocket.com/ 19 http://www.flowgram.com/
  • 23. Some of my favorite RIA https://www.photoshop.com/express/ http://www.sliderocket.com/ 19 http://www.flowgram.com/
  • 24. Some of my favorite RIA https://www.photoshop.com/express/ http://www.sliderocket.com/ 19 http://www.flowgram.com/
  • 25. Some of my favorite RIA https://www.photoshop.com/express/ http://www.sliderocket.com/ 19 http://www.flowgram.com/
  • 26. Web 2.0 20
  • 27. Personal Learning Environments 21
  • 28. How big is your ‘digital footprint’? = 281 billion GB (2007) = 45 GB (2007) 22
  • 29. So many locations for information ... “Check the events page for activities.” (http://frank.mtsu.edu/ ~events/upcoming.html ) “My Blackboard pages, email and blog are the main means of communication.” “Check my Facebook page and Twitter.” “I post at Flickr, YouTube, SlideShare.” 23
  • 30. How can we provide easier access to all this information? 24
  • 31. RSS 25
  • 32. RSS 25
  • 33. RSS 25
  • 34. RSS Real Simple Syndication Content is published in a standard format (XML) Readers can subscribe to the feed to get updated information e.g. Subscribe to Feed 26
  • 35. Does your web site offer an RSS feed? 27
  • 36. RSS feed offered by blog 28
  • 37. Example 29
  • 38. Example 30
  • 39. RSS feeds are offered by Almost all blogs Flickr YouTube Twitter ... and also by Google Calendar 31
  • 40. Advantage User does not have to go to web page Can be read through other tools (feed readers/aggregators) Can be included on other pages Can be combined with other content (mashups) Can be filtered using tags and categories 32
  • 41. Possible education-related feeds News Homework assignments University news Cafeteria menu Course materials with additional information ... 33
  • 42. Uses Faculty/students can subscribe to the feed and show them on their web site Parents see homework assignments on their iGoogle page Course page includes related feeds 34
  • 43. How do you create RSS feeds? Blogs, CMS, ... automatically generate RSS feeds Write feed by hand Tools like FeedForAll http://www.rss-specifications.com/create-rss-feed.htm 35
  • 44. RSS feed for general web pages Use software to write your RSS file e.g. FeedForAll (not tested by me) Use Screen Scraping service FeedYes Feed43 Feedity 36
  • 45. Demonstration Creating a feed from a web site using Feed43 37
  • 46. Using RSS feeds Aggregators Mashups Custom widgets 38
  • 47. What makes rss feeds retrievable? Tags Categories 39
  • 48. iGoogle, NetVibes,... 40
  • 49. iGoogle, NetVibes,... 40
  • 50. Michael Wesh’s NetVibes page 41
  • 51. Mashups 42
  • 52. What is a mashup? 43
  • 53. WHAT IS A MASHUP?
  • 54. 45
  • 55. Example 1 New York Times Through Flickr 46
  • 56. Example 2 Weatherbonk 47
  • 57. Example 3 mapdango 48
  • 58. One more Sea level rise 49
  • 59. Resource: Programmableweb.com 50
  • 60. Other examples http://mashupawards.com/category/education/ http://programmableweb.com 51
  • 61. What makes mashups possible? Standards RSS XML APIs 52
  • 62. Creating your own mashups HTML, JavaScript, CSS Enterprise software Presto Web 2.0 tools Yahoo Pipes Microsoft Popfly (Google Mashup editor) http://www.MapBuilder.net/ 53
  • 63. Or: Dapper http://www.dapper.net/ Creates RSS feeds and dapps/widgets from one or several pages e.g. http://www.dapper.net/dapp-howto-use.php? dappName=StanfordSchoolofEducationNews 54
  • 64. Also: openkapow 55
  • 65. Creating a mashup in Yahoo Pipes 56
  • 66. Editing mode for pipe 57
  • 67. Basic mashup: displaying an RSS feed Goal: Display the entries from multiple blogs related to a specific topic 58
  • 68. Pipes basic example: working with RSS feeds 59
  • 69. More advanced pipe Analyzing content 60
  • 70. So, what about Web 3.0? 61
  • 71. Have you heard of web 3.0? 62
  • 72. Eric Schmidt (Google) Web 63
  • 73. created using http://www.wordle.net/ 64
  • 74. Is there/will there be a web 3.0? 65
  • 75. Hints that web 3.0 is coming 10 year cycles of web innovation Conferences Google search 66
  • 76. eWeek: 4 Tech Trends to watch in 2009 Next Gen Web Platforms Google Chrome, IE,... Offline capabilities Open mobile platforms Cloud computing Semantic Web 67
  • 77. 2009 Horizon Report 1. One Year or Less: Mobiles (7) 2. One Year or Less: Cloud Computing (5) 3. Two to Three Years: Geo-Everything (2) 4. Two to Three Years: The Personal Web (7) 5. Four to Five Years: Semantic-Aware Applications (3) 6. Four to Five Years: Smart Objects (2) (by The New Media Consortium and the eduCause Learning initiative) 68
  • 78. 69
  • 79. Google Trends for the term ‘Web 3.0’ 70
  • 80. Web 3.0: 3D-Internet? 71
  • 81. Web 3.0: 3D-Internet? 71
  • 82. Web 3.0: 3D-Internet? 71
  • 83. Web 3.0: 3D-Internet? 71
  • 84. Web 3.0: 3D-Internet? 71
  • 85. Web 3.0: 3D-Internet? 71
  • 86. Web 3.0: 3D-Internet? 71
  • 87. Web 3.0: The mobile web? 72
  • 88. Prediction: Web 3.0 will be all about the data 73
  • 89. Web 2.0? 74
  • 90. Web 2.0? 74
  • 91. Web 3.0? 75
  • 92. Web 3.0? 75
  • 93. Web 3.0? It’s all about the data 75
  • 94. Web 3.0? 76
  • 95. Web 3.0? 76
  • 96. Web 3.0? Info finds you 76
  • 97. How can the best info find you? 77
  • 98. What is web 3.0? - take 3 Web 1.0 focused on basic infrastructure of web, navigation and information Web 2.0 is front-end: usability, making connections Web 3.0 back to backend: improving the indexing of data 78
  • 99. Semantic Web 79
  • 100. Semantic? Helmut Doll “Helmut Doll is learning about (person) the semantic web” <p> Helmut Doll is learning about the semantic web</p> display is correct semantic meaning not understood web (topic) 80
  • 101. Interview with Tim Berners-Lee about the Semantic Web 81
  • 102. What is the semantic web? the web as a database information described and linked in such a way that it can easily be understood and processed by machines 82
  • 103. Underpinnings of the semantic web Defining information: RDF (Resource Description Framework) Terms, data and relationships: Ontology OWL Interference Engines SPARQL Intelligent agents that scan the web for information 83
  • 104. Resource Description Framework - RDF language for declaring things, and attributes and relationships between things <?xml version=quot;1.0quot;?> <rdf:RDF xmlns:rdf=quot;http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#quot; xmlns:cd=quot;http://www.recshop.fake/cd#quot;> <rdf:Description rdf:about=quot;http://www.recshop.fake/cd/Empire Burlesquequot;> <cd:artist>Bob Dylan</cd:artist> <cd:country>USA</cd:country> ... </rdf:Description>... </rdf:RDF> How do we get these RDF descriptions? Web authors/hosts create rdf files for their content Tools create RDF files automatically 84
  • 105. quot;Without a killer semantic web app for consumers, site owners have been reluctant to support standards like RDF, or even microformats. We believe that app can be web search.quot; (Amit Kumar, Yahoo, 3/2008) 85
  • 106. 86
  • 107. 2 directions Search by concept e.g. Search for entries related to the movie ‘solaris’, not just the term solaris Display of linked data e.g. a web page you post about ‘PA government’ shows also related images, links, movies,... 87
  • 108. Semantic web search- medline 88
  • 109. Semantic Search - semantifind 89
  • 110. Examples: Twine and Evri http://www.twine.com/twine/110hqkd8h-17y/semantic-web Aggregates based on topic Web content analyzed http://www.evri.com/person/barack-obama-0x16f69.html 90
  • 111. Example tool to use RDF Semantic Radar (Firefox plug-in to detect RDF content in web pages): https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/3886 Test http://wikier.org 91
  • 112. Tagging example: Calais Service that automatically generates semantic tagging to web pages http://opencalais.com (Also Auto Tagger Plugin for WordPress blogs) Tagaroo for wordpress 92