Understanding the Impact of Your Company's Culture

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A company's culture is described as the personality of an organization. It guides how employees think, act, and feel at work. Research has shown that great workplaces have lower voluntary employee turnover than their competitors, are able to recruit the best employees, provide top quality customer service and create innovative products. We will discuss the importance of employee-employer culture fit on job satisfaction. You will learn to evaluate how well you fit your company’s culture and how this affects your career growth.

Connect with me at linkd.in/hdelcastillo for more information regarding upcoming courses to lead innovation to create value within your company, or prepare for an AIPMM certification, and earn PDUs.

Let me know how I can help you create and implement a product strategy and product planning process successfully within your organization to drive business growth.

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  • AIPMM offers globally recognized certifications for product managers, product marketing managers and brand managers.Certified Product Manager (CPM), Certified Product Marketing Management (CPMM) and Agile Certified Product Manager (ACPM). Certification requires obtaining a college degree, minimum one year of experience, and passing a certification examination.
  • A company's culture is described as the personality of an organization. It guides how employees think, act, and feel at work. Research has shown that great workplaces have lower voluntary employee turnover than their competitors, are able to recruit the best employees, provide top quality customer service and create innovative products. We will discuss the importance of employee-employer culture fit on job satisfaction. You will learn how to evaluate how well you fit your company’s culture and how this affects your career growth within your company.
  • A company's culture is described as the personality of an organization. It guides how employees think, act, and feel at work. It is the collective way we do things within an organization. It is an area that is not always fully understood by many cross-functional managersand is not optimally utilized either in an organization.
  • A company's culture is described as the personality of an organization. It guides how employees think, act, and feel at work. It is the collective way we do things within an organization. It is an area that is not always fully understood by many cross-functional managersand is not optimally utilized either in an organization.
  • In their March 19, 2012 issue, FORTUNE magazine named the 50 most admired companies. The Most Admired list is the definitive report card on corporate reputations. Our survey partners at Hay Group started with approximately 1,400 companies: the Fortune 1,000 (the 1,000 largest U.S. companies ranked by revenue), non-U.S. companies in Fortune’s Global 500 database with revenue of $10 billion or more, and the top foreign companies operating in the U.S.They then sorted the companies by industry and selected the 15 largest for each international industry and the 10 largest for each U.S. industry. A total of 698 companies from 32 countries were surveyed. (Due to an insufficient response rate, the results for 11 companies in the scientific, photographic, and control equipment industry were not published. In addition, due to the distribution of responses, only the aggregate scores and ranks for the 10 companies in the oil and gas equipment/services industry were published.) To create the 58 industry lists, Hay asked executives, directors, and analysts to rate companies in their own industry on nine criteria, from investment value to social responsibility. This year only the best are listed in the magazine: A company's score must rank in the top half of its industry survey. Online, all companies' results are displayed. To arrive at the top 50 Most Admired Companies overall, the Hay Group asked 3,855 executives, directors, and securities analysts who had responded to the industry surveys to select the 10 companies they admired most. They chose from a list made up of the companies that ranked in the top 25% in last year's surveys, plus those that finished in the top 20% of their industry. Anyone could vote for any company in any industry. The difference in the voting rolls is why some results can seem anomalous -- for example, although FedEx is one of the top 10 Most Admired Companies, it is second in the Delivery industry behind top-ranked UPS, which ranked 29th on the top 50 overall.
  • Driven by the business strategy.Impacts the maturity and adoption of processes and tools.
  • Defines the business structure.Average number of working hours, including options such as flextime and telecommuting.Work environment, including how employees interact, the degree of competition, and whether it's a fun or hostile environment, or something in between.Acceptable dress code, including the accepted styles of attire and things such as casual days.Office space you get, including things such as cubicles, window offices, and rules regarding display of personal items.Training and skills development you receive, which you need both on the job and to keep yourself marketable for future jobs and employers.Onsite perks, such as break rooms, gyms and play rooms, daycare facilities, and more.Amount of time outside the office you're expected to spend with co-workers.Interaction with other employees, including managers and top management.
  • Corporate culture impacts your interaction with other employees, including managers and top management.Corporate culture impacts your career growth.
  • Average number of working hours, including options such as flextime and telecommuting.Work environment, including how employees interact, the degree of competition, and whether it's a fun or hostile environment, or something in between.Acceptable dress code, including the accepted styles of attire and things such as casual days.Office space you get, including things such as cubicles, window offices, and rules regarding display of personal items.Training and skills development you receive, which you need both on the job and to keep yourself marketable for future jobs and employers.Onsite perks, such as break rooms, gyms and play rooms, daycare facilities, and more.Amount of time outside the office you're expected to spend with co-workers.Interaction with other employees, including managers and top management.
  • Employee-Company Fit Impacts Career Growth.It’s a ripple effect.Fit impacts Job Satisfaction.Job Satisfaction impacts work performance/productivity. Work performance impacts high performance ratings. High performance ratings impact career growth.
  • The Seven S Framework first appeared in "The Art of Japanese Management" by Richard Pascale and Anthony Athos in 1981.  References:For more about strategy and strategic management in general, look out "Strategic Management" by Dess & Miller (McGraw Hill 1993). If you want more on the 7S model, read Richard Pascale's subsequent "Managing on the Edge" (1990). 
  • Hard Factors:Strategy: A set of actions that you start with and must maintainStructure: How people and tasks / work are organisedSystems: All the processes and information flows that link the organisation together"Hard" elements are easier to define or identify and management can directly influence them: These are strategy statements; organization charts and reporting lines; and formal processes and IT systems.
  • Soft Factors:Shared Values: the values and beliefs of the company that shapes the destiny of the organisationStaff: How you develop managers (current and future)Skills: Dominant attributes or capabilities that exist in the organisationStyle:How managers behave"Soft" elements, on the other hand, can be more difficult to describe, and are less tangible and more influenced by culture. However, these soft elements are as important as the hard elements if the organization is going to be successful.
  • Shared values of the organization are expressed in its management practices.
  • Shared values are the core values of the company. They are evidenced in the corporate culture and the general work ethic.
  • Three types of personal values:Physical values – one strives to achieve with regard to physical objects, work and one’s environment Interpersonal values – one seeks to express in relationships with other people Psychological values – one aspires to realize in one’s own personality & inner being Source: Personal Values, Wikia, 2012
  • This is a structured approach for measuring Employee-Company fit.The alternative is to ask the following questions to people you work with.What 10 words would you use to describe our company?
  • Additional Questions To AskWhat 10 words would you use to describe our company? How do people from different departments interact? Are there opportunities for further training and education? Around here what behaviors get rewarded? Do you feel as though you know what's going on? How effectively does the company communicate to its employees?
  • Questions To Ask:How are decisions made and how are they communicated to the staff?What role does the person who gets this position play in decision-making?How does the organization emphasize working in teams?What are the organization's priorities for the next few years?What are the established career paths for employees in this position?
  • Questions To Ask:What 10 words would you use to describe your company? What's it really like to work here? Do you like it here?Around here what's is really important? How are employees valued around here?What skills and characteristics does the company value?Do you feel as though you know what is expected of you?How do people from different departments interact?Are there opportunities for further training and education?How do people get promoted around here? Around here what behaviors get rewarded? Do you feel as though you know what's going on?How effectively does the company communicate to its employees?
  • Questions To Ask:What 10 words would you use to describe your company? What's it really like to work here? Do you like it here?Around here what's is really important? How are employees valued around here?What skills and characteristics does the company value?Do you feel as though you know what is expected of you?How do people from different departments interact?Are there opportunities for further training and education?How do people get promoted around here? Around here what behaviors get rewarded? Do you feel as though you know what's going on?How effectively does the company communicate to its employees?
  • The bottom line is that you are going to spend a lot of time in the work environment.If you want to be happy, successful, and productive, you'll want to be in a place where you fit the culture. A place where you can have a voice, be respected, and have opportunities for growth.
  • Here is an upcoming training opportunity that I will lead.
  • Here is an upcoming training opportunity that I will lead.
  • Contact me for any of the following:Obtain information about upcoming certification courses in your area.Let me know how I can help your business grow by defining and implementing the right product strategy.Obtain the answer worksheet.Obtain copies of these slides.
  • Contact me for any of the following:Obtain information about upcoming certification courses in your area.Let me know how I can help your business grow by defining and implementing the right product strategy.Obtain the answer worksheet.Obtain copies of these slides.
  • Understanding the Impact of Your Company's Culture

    1. 1. Hector Del Castillo linkd.in/hdelcastillo PMISSC Early Show April 11, 2012© AIPMM 2012
    2. 2. Hector Del Castillo • Over 10 years transforming products to profit for technology-based companies • AIPMM Body of Knowledge (ProdBOK®) Contributor • Established companies – Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Lucent Technologies, MEI Technologies • Small companies and startups – Nextone Communications, Smith Micro Software • Launched 27+ Products for global deployment – HW/SW, Telecom, Enterprise Mobility, Information Security Services, Professional Development • Certified PMP®, CPM® and CPMM® • University of California at Santa Barbara, MS EE • University of Texas at El Paso, MS EE, BS EE© AIPMM 2012
    3. 3. © AIPMM 2012
    4. 4. © AIPMM 2012
    5. 5. AIPMM Certifications Certified Product Manager (CPM®) Certified Product Marketing Manager (CPMM®) Agile Certified Product Manager (ACPM®) Source: Get Certified, AIPMM Website© AIPMM 2012
    6. 6. What We Will Discuss 1. What is Corporate Culture? 2. Why You Need To Understand It 3. Assessing Your Fit In the Workplace 4. Key Takeaways© AIPMM 2012
    7. 7. What is Corporate Culture? ”It’s a set of shared mental assumptions that guide interpretation and action in organizations by defining appropriate behavior for various situations.” Source: Ravasi, D., Schultz, M. , "Responding to organizational identity threats: exploring the role of organizational culture", Academy of Management Journal, Vol.49, No.3, 2006.© AIPMM 2012
    8. 8. What is Corporate Culture? ”The specific collection of values and norms that are shared by people and groups in an organization and that control the way they interact with each other and with stakeholders outside the organization." Source: “Strategic Management,” Charles W. L. Hill, and Gareth R. Jones, Houghton Mifflin, 2001© AIPMM 2012
    9. 9. Fortune’s Most Admired Companies Rank Company Industry Industry Rank 1 Apple 1 Computers 2 Google 1 Internet Services & Retailing 3 Amazon.com 2 Internet Services & Retailing 4 Coca-Cola 1 Beverages 5 IBM 1 IT Services 6 FedEx 2 Delivery 7 Berkshire Hathaway 1 Property and Casualty 8 Starbucks Coffee 2 Food Services 9 Procter & Gamble 1 Soaps and Cosmetics 10 Southwest Airlines 3 Airlines Source: FORTUNE Magazine, 19 Mar 2012© AIPMM 2012
    10. 10. Benefits of a Great Workplace • Lower voluntary employee turnover than their competitors • Able to recruit the best employees to fit their needs • Create innovative successful products • Provide top quality customer service • Better positioned for growth than their competitors Workplaces with a great corporate culture are more financially successful than their peers. Source: Michael Burchell & Jennifer Robin, “The Great Workplace – How to Build It, How to Keep It, And Why It Matters,” Jan 2011© AIPMM 2012
    11. 11. Why Understand Corporate Culture Process Provides a positive or negative impact on People project outcomes. Culture© AIPMM 2012
    12. 12. Why Understand Corporate Culture Process Impacts your work environment. People Culture© AIPMM 2012
    13. 13. Why Understand Corporate Culture Process Fit between you and your company People impacts your career Culture growth.© AIPMM 2012
    14. 14. Culture Impacts Work Environment • Number of working hours • Dress code • Type of office space • Training and skills development • Onsite perks • Amount of time outside the office • Interaction with employees, managers and executives Source: Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D., “Uncovering a Companys Corporate Culture is a Critical Task for Job-Seekers,” Quintessential Careers© AIPMM 2012
    15. 15. Fit Impacts Career Growth High Employee-Company Culture Fit means: • Higher job satisfaction – Higher work performance – Receive better performance ratings • Greater commitment to the organization – More likely to help others • Less likely to leave the organization Source: Charles A. O’Reilly et al., “People and Organizational Culture: A Profile Comparison Approach to Assessing Person–Organization Fit,” Academy of Management Journal, vol. 34 no. 3, 1991.© AIPMM 2012
    16. 16. Elements of Corporate Culture Source: McKinsey 7S Framework© AIPMM 2012
    17. 17. Hard Factors • Strategy: the direction and scope of the company over the long term. • Structure: the basic organization of the company, its departments, reporting lines, areas of expertise and responsibility (and how they inter-relate). • Systems: formal and informal procedures that govern everyday activity, covering everything from management information systems, through to the systems at the point of contact with the customer (retail systems, call center systems, online systems, etc.). Source: McKinsey 7S Framework© AIPMM 2012
    18. 18. Soft Factors • Shared values: the values and beliefs of the company that guide employees towards valued behavior. • Staff: the companys people resources and how the are developed, trained and motivated. • Skills: the capabilities and competencies that exist within the company. What it does best. • Style: the leadership approach of top management and the companys overall operating approach. Source: McKinsey 7S Framework© AIPMM 2012
    19. 19. 1. Focus on shared values Values help anchor Values are universal employees and guide principles or ideals how they implicitly that we think, act, acceptand guidelines. as feel.© AIPMM 2012
    20. 20. Know Your Company’s Strategic Plan A companys culture starts with the companys mission and values, which should be well thought-out and documented.© AIPMM 2012
    21. 21. Evaluate Strategic Objectives Financial How much investment is needed? How soon will we break even? Learning & Growth Customer What key resources are Product What are the unmet needs? needed? Vision & Mission Who are the customers? What knowledge and skills are needed? Who’s most likely to buy? Business Processes What key activities and deliverables are needed?© AIPMM 2012
    22. 22. 2. Identify Your Personal Values© AIPMM 2012
    23. 23. Assess Your Core Values Physical Values Interpersonal Values Psychological Values Cleanliness Orderliness Concern for Loyalty Adventurousness Integrity others Content over form Perfection in Equality Pleasing others Commitment Knowledge details Continuous Punctuality Collaboration Respect for Creativity Love improvement others Discipline Quality of work Cooperation Self-giving Decisiveness Openness Endurance Regularity Coordination Service to others Determination Perseverance Excellence Safety Community Solidarity Equanimity Personal growth Hard Work Speed Fairness Teamwork Faith Resourcefulness Maximum Systemization Freedom Tolerance Goodwill Self-reliance utilization Harmony Trust Goodness Self-respect Honesty Gratitude Truth Source: Personal Values, Wikia, 2012© AIPMM 2012
    24. 24. 3. Assess your culture fit Source: Charles A. O’Reilly et al., “People and Organizational Culture: A Profile Comparison Approach to Assessing Person–Organization Fit,” Academy of Management Journal, vol. 34 no. 3, 1991.© AIPMM 2012
    25. 25. Assess Employee-Company Fit • Identify and rank your work values • Identify and rank your company’s shared values • Look for the extent of the match Source: Charles A. O’Reilly et al., “People and Organizational Culture: A Profile Comparison Approach to Assessing Person–Organization Fit,” Academy of Management Journal, vol. 34 no. 3, 1991.© AIPMM 2012
    26. 26. a. Identify Your Work Values Achievement-oriented Experimenting Predictability Aggressive Fitting in Professional growth Analytical High expectations Results oriented Attention to detail High pay for performance Risk taking Autonomy Highly organized Rule oriented Calm Innovation Security Careful Long hours Shares information Collaboration Low conflict Socially responsible Competitive Opportunities Stability Decisiveness Praises performance Team oriented Demanding Precise Trust Source: Konrad, Alison, “Organizational Culture, Values and Fit in the Workplace: Making The Right Job Choices,” Richard Ivey School of Business Foundation, Jul 2011© AIPMM 2012
    27. 27. b. Rank Your Work Values • Rate each of the 33 adjectives in the previous slide on a scale of (1) to (7), according to the desirability of that factor in a work situation. • You can only give two of the 33 items the very highest rating (7), and only two items can receive your very lowest rating (1). You can give four items a rating of (6) and four items a rating of (2). Only six items can be rated as a (5) or a (3), and nine items receive the midpoint (5). • Your highest ratings should go to the adjectives you consider to be the most highly desirable in a work situation. Your lowest ratings should go to the adjectives you consider to be least desirable or undesirable. Source: Konrad, Alison, “Organizational Culture, Values and Fit in the Workplace: Making The Right Job Choices,” Richard Ivey School of Business Foundation, Jul 2011© AIPMM 2012
    28. 28. Your Work Values Highest (7 pts) – Two values (6 pts) – Four values (5 pts) – Six values Midpoint (4 pts) – Nine values (3 pts) – Six values (2 pts) – Four values Lowest (1 pt) – Two values Source: Konrad, Alison, “Organizational Culture, Values and Fit in the Workplace: Making The Right Job Choices,” Richard Ivey School of Business Foundation, Jul 2011© AIPMM 2012
    29. 29. c. Rank Your Company’s Values • Rate each of the 33 adjectives in the previous slide on a scale of (1) to (7), according to the desirability of that factor in your company. • Your highest ratings should go to the adjectives that are most characteristic of your company. Your lowest ratings should go to the adjectives that are least characteristic or uncharacteristic of your company. • You can only give two of the 33 items the very highest rating (7), and only two items can receive your very lowest rating (1). You can give four items a rating of (6) and four items a rating of (2). Only six items can be rated as a (5) or a (3), and nine items receive the midpoint (5). Source: Konrad, Alison, “Organizational Culture, Values and Fit in the Workplace: Making The Right Job Choices,” Richard Ivey School of Business Foundation, Jul 2011© AIPMM 2012
    30. 30. Your Company’s Shared Values Highest (7 pts) – Two values (6 pts) – Four values (5 pts) – Six values Midpoint (4 pts) – Nine values (3 pts) – Six values (2 pts) – Four values Lowest (1 pt) – Two values Source: Konrad, Alison, “Organizational Culture, Values and Fit in the Workplace: Making The Right Job Choices,” Richard Ivey School of Business Foundation, Jul 2011© AIPMM 2012
    31. 31. Ask The Right Questions • How are employees valued around here? • How are decisions made and how are they communicated? • How does the organization emphasize working in teams? • What are the organizations priorities for the next few years? • How do you know what is expected of you? • What skills and characteristics does the company value most? • How do people get promoted around here? Source: Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D., “Uncovering a Companys Corporate Culture is a Critical Task for Job-Seekers,” Quintessential Careers© AIPMM 2012
    32. 32. 4. Find a great workplace© AIPMM 2012
    33. 33. What Makes A Great Workplace • Employees trust the people they work for • Employees take pride in what they do • Employees enjoy working with each other It’s not all about the perks and extravagant benefits; it’s the relationships at work that matter. Source: Michael Burchell, “Great Places to Work: How Company Culture Affects Company Success,” Jan 2011© AIPMM 2012
    34. 34. Top 10 Companies To Work For Rank Company Job growth U.S. employees 1 Google 33% 18,500 2 Boston Consulting Group 10% 1,958 3 SAS Institute 8% 6,046 4 Wegmans Food Markets 5% 41,717 5 Edward Jones 1% 36,937 6 NetApp 30% 6,887 7 Camden Property Trust -2% 1,678 8 Recreational Equipment (REI) 12% 10,466 9 CHG Healthcare Services 17% 1,312 10 Quicken Loans 20% 3,808 Source: FORTUNE Magazine, 6 Feb 2012© AIPMM 2012
    35. 35. Local companies to work for Maryland Company City U.S. employees Marriott International Bethesda (HQ) 3,429 Morningstar Oakland 62 W. L. Gore & Associates Elkton 2,254 Source: FORTUNE Magazine, 6 Feb 2012© AIPMM 2012
    36. 36. Local companies to work for DC Company City U.S. employees Bingham McCutchen Washington, DC 309 Booz Allen Hamilton Washington, DC 1,729 Bright Horizons Family Solutions Washington, DC 350 Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants Washington, DC 719 Millennium: The Takeda Oncology Co. Washington, DC 3 Perkins Coie Washington, DC 146 Source: FORTUNE Magazine, 6 Feb 2012© AIPMM 2012
    37. 37. Local companies to work for Company City U.S. employees Accenture Reston 4,000 Virginia Balfour Beatty Construction Fairfax 380 Booz Allen Hamilton McLean (HQ) 5,649 Booz Allen Hamilton Herndon 3,204 Capital One Richmond 5,307 Capital One McLean (HQ) 1,377 CarMax Richmond (HQ) 806 Deloitte Arlington 3,437 DPR Construction Falls Church 151 Navy Federal Credit Union Vienna (HQ) 2,924 Navy Federal Credit Union Winchester 475 Rackspace Hosting Blacksburg 107 SRC Chantilly 131 Source: FORTUNE Magazine, 6 Feb 2012© AIPMM 2012
    38. 38. 5. Find the right opportunity© AIPMM 2012
    39. 39. Assess An Employer’s Culture Before an Interview • Conduct an informational interview. • Review the companys annual report, website and other materials. • WetFeet.com provides key information and feedback from company employees. Source: Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D., “Uncovering a Companys Corporate Culture is a Critical Task for Job-Seekers,” Quintessential Careers© AIPMM 2012
    40. 40. Before You Accept An Offer During an Interview • Spend time observing how current employees interact with each other, how they are dressed, and their level of courtesy and professionalism • Ask questions to get a feel for the corporate culture Source: Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D., “Uncovering a Companys Corporate Culture is a Critical Task for Job-Seekers,” Quintessential Careers© AIPMM 2012
    41. 41. Questions To Ask • What 10 words would you use to describe • Are there opportunities for further your company? training and education? • Whats it really like to work here? Do you • How do people get promoted around like it here? here? • Whats is really important around here? • What behaviors get rewarded around • How are employees valued around here? here? • What skills and characteristics does the • How do you know whats going on around company value? here? • How do you know what is expected of • How effectively does the company you? communicate to its employees? • How do people from different departments interact? Source: Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D., “Uncovering a Companys Corporate Culture is a Critical Task for Job-Seekers,” Quintessential Careers© AIPMM 2012
    42. 42. Key Takeaways 1 • Focus on shared values 2 • Identify your work values 3 • Assess your culture fit 4 • Identify a great workplace 5 • Find the right opportunity© AIPMM 2012
    43. 43. Upcoming Training Courses Dates and Upcoming Courses Location 280 Group: Optimal Product Management and Marketing (OPM) Apr 16-18, 2012 Price: $2,495 per person; Pay only $1,995 per person when you register by Teqcorner, May 1st. Group discount of 10% when you register 3 people. To register, McLean, VA contact Melissa Holtzer at 408-832-1237 or at melissa@280group.com. 280 Group: Certified Product Manager (CPM®) Exam Intensive Prep Course Apr 19, 2012 Price: $1,295 per person; Includes 12-month AIPMM membership ($125 Teqcorner, savings) and exam fee ($395 savings). Pay only $795 per person when you McLean, VA register in conjunction with the Optimal Product Management (OPM) course. To register, contact Melissa Holtzer at 408-832-1237 or at melissa@280group.com.© AIPMM 2012
    44. 44. Upcoming Training Courses Dates and Upcoming Courses Location CIL875: Certified Innovation Leadership May 17-18, 2012 - Igniting innovation and business growth (16 PDUs) Teqcorner Price: $1,697 per person; Pay only $1,597 per person when you register by McLean, VA May 9th. Group discount of $1,357 per person when you register 5 people. To register, contact Hector Del Castillo at hmdelcastillo@aipmm.com. PMM835: Creating Value Through Collaboration (16 PDUs) May 22-23, 2012 Price: $997 per person; Pay only $972 per person when you register by May Rockville, MD 14th. To register, contact Hector Del Castillo at hmdelcastillo@aipmm.com.© AIPMM 2012
    45. 45. CIL875: Certified Innovation Leadership - Igniting innovation and business growth (16 PDUs) Date: Thursday, Friday, May 17-18, 2012 Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM EDT Place: Teqcorner, McLean, VA Price: $1,697 per person This course covers best practices and proven methodologies to lead innovation efforts in order for your company to gain or maintain a competitive advantage using a sustainable approach. You will learn knowledge, skills, and tools to integrate and align strategic objectives with a managed and purposeful innovation culture. This course fully prepares you to take the Certified Innovation Leader (CIL) certification exam, which is administered at the end of day two. Price includes training, certification exam fee, AIPMM premium membership, and over 350 templates from Demand Metric. * Use promo code “pmimember” and pay only $1,597 per person when you register by May 9th. Group discount of 20% when you register 5 people.© AIPMM 2012
    46. 46. CIL875: Certified Innovation Leadership - Igniting innovation and business growth (16 PDUs) Day 1 Day 2 Introduction Strategic Innovation Leverage and Phase 3: Develop Alignment (SILA) Phase 4: Develop Project Identification Phase 5: Qualify Business Case Development Phase 5: Launch Phase 1: Conceive Exam Review Phase 2: Plan Certified Innovation Leader (CIL®) Practice Questions Certification Exam© AIPMM 2012
    47. 47. PMM835: Creating Value Through Collaboration (16 PDUs) Date: Tuesday, Wednesday, May 22-23, 2012 Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM EDT Place: Rockville, MD Price: $997 per person This course covers best practices and proven methodologies to lead innovation efforts in order for your company to gain or maintain a competitive advantage using a sustainable approach. You will learn knowledge, skills, and tools to integrate and align strategic objectives with a managed and purposeful innovation culture. The complete product life cycle, from concept to retirement provides unlimited opportunities for innovation. You will learn how to define and implement an innovation process to create new revenue streams while maintaining operational effectiveness. *Use promo code “pmimember” and get $25 off if you register by May 14th.© AIPMM 2012
    48. 48. PMM835: Creating Value Through Collaboration (16 PDUs) Day 1 Day 2 Background Why Product Management Matters Know Your Blind Spots The Role of a Product Manager Bringing It All Together The Importance of Project Management The Role of a Project Manager© AIPMM 2012
    49. 49. For More Information About • AIPMM membership • Upcoming training courses in your area • Help to implement the right product strategy & process to grow your business© AIPMM 2012
    50. 50. Join My Professional Network! Hector Del Castillo, PMP, CPM, CPMM Transforming products to profit for technology-based organizations.TM Product Marketing Director, AIPMM Connect: linkd.in/hdelcastillo Follow: @hmdelcastillo Contact: hmdelcastillo@aipmm.com© AIPMM 2012

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