Ten tales of transformation
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Ten tales of transformation

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Keynote to Greenwich e-learning conference 2011

Keynote to Greenwich e-learning conference 2011

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  • 1. Ten Tales ofTransformationHelen BeethamGreenwich, 6 July 2011
  • 2. tales around the campfire...
  • 3. ... while the building is burning?
  • 4. Transformations we’re facingStable job market in specific vocations and Unstable job market: adaptability & management ofprofessions multiple roles to the foreIncreasing public investment in post-compulsory Decreasing public investment in post-compulsoryeducation educationAssumption of higher education as a public good Assumption of higher education as a private goodSupport for innovation and excellence in learning Return on investment a priorityand teachingInstitutions share many elements of their core Diverse institutions including private institutionsbusiness model with different business modelsTeaching, accreditation, research, content Core activities disaggregated: specialisation of rolesproduction, innovation, BCE all linked as well as institutionsUniversities offer a wide range of disciplines and Course portfolios reflect market demandsubject areas (enlightenment, ‘liberal arts’ model)Established methods, based in disciplines Emerging and mixed methods, interdisciplinary problem spacesLearners have space and time to study and get Learners are fitting learning into their lives;qualified continuing professional development the normElite institutions attract international students All universities are seeking to exploit the global market in education and the UK HE brand
  • 5. the technology fix story
  • 6. technology per se does not...• create time• create money• create opportunity• offer resilience in uncertain times
  • 7. Transformations we’re leadingCampus experience Diverse study locations including workplaces and satellite campuses (which may be overseas)We know, we teach you Learners capabilities a resource for the institutionDevelopment interventions tending to be Graduate attributes addressed across programmesremedial of studyProgrammes developed to meet academic norms, Agile, responsive curriculum development,committee-dominated and paper-based processes Collaborative approach to educational designTechnologies introduced according to the Curriculum modified by the impacts of technologyrequirements of the curriculum in the environmentModular assessment: focus on achievement within Cross-modular assessment: focus on self-efficacyclearly defined curriculum goals and integrating skills/know-howHidden curriculum’ Curriculum transparent, richly described Learners describing their own curriculumCourses defined by content Content is open, free, shared in subject communities, and dissociated from specific coursesLearning about and for the ‘outside world’ Learning in the world: borderless universitiesPersonal resources for learning and study Shared knowledge resources, knowledge networks
  • 8. 1. Campus experience Diverse study locations, students fitting learning into their life [WBL] shifts the balance whereby the academic facilitates the learning in a very different way. OER allow us to continue that shift, because learners sitting wherever – in Wrigleys, in a cafe – can access a range of resources suited to his or her own workplace. Its about democratising education. reflective practice | professional practice | literacies research methods | leadership | management coaching | mentoring
  • 9. 2. We know, we teach you Learners capabilities a resource for the institution
  • 10. 2. We know, we teach you Learners capabilities a resource for the institution* web 2.0 drop-in sessions for staff/students* student surveys and institutional research* presentations to business* creating podcasts, digital stories and videos A student-led and operated enterprise trading in tacit knowledge/know-how contained in the student body, providing a range of services to the university, students and business.
  • 11. 3. Programmes developed to Agile, responsive curriculummeet academic norms: development, facilitated by trustedcommittee-dominated and paper- course informationbased processes Supporting Responsive Curricula Course database xcri compatible Single trusted source of course information Competence mapping in four exemplar subject areas Agile, responsive design process Supporting student showcasing
  • 12. 3. Programmes developed to Agile, responsive curriculummeet academic norms: development, facilitated by trustedcommittee-dominated and paper- course informationbased processes The first-year undergraduate curriculum is now on-line, which is already providing benefits in terms of sharing good practice and identifying areas where further central support is required... The PARM standing panel approach has proved agile, streamlined and cost-effective. Quality has been maintained by providing much tighter guidance to programme teams on structure and documentation and by focusing the Panel process on academic issues.
  • 13. 3. Programmes developed to Agile, responsive curriculummeet academic norms: development, facilitated by trustedcommittee-dominated and paper- course informationbased processes * workshops on integrating competences into the curriculum * use of visual aids to describe curriculum in shared ways * involving learners and employers in meaningful dialogue * exploring critical elements of the curriculum e.g. induction, transition, timing of assessments
  • 14. 3. Programmes developed to Collaborative approach tomeet academic norms: educational design, sharedcommittee-dominated and paper- understandingbased processes * workshops on integrating competences into the curriculum * use of visual aids to describe curriculum in shared ways * involving learners and employers in meaningful dialogue * exploring critical elements of the curriculum e.g. creativity, information/digital literacies, learning activities Viewpoints
  • 15. 3. Programmes developed to Collaborative approach tomeet academic norms: educational design, sharedcommittee-dominated and paper- understandingbased processes Helped focus on learning and teaching from a student viewpoint Course committee’s aren’t well attended... it’s good to talk [we came up with] a structure that the whole group could be happy with (Students’ Union)
  • 16. 4. Development interventions Graduate attributes addressedtend to be remedial across programmes of study At Oxford Brookes University, ‘Digital Literacy’ is one of five graduate attributes, described with seven categories (cf. SCONUL’s 7 pillars of information literacy)
  • 17. 4. Development interventions Graduate attributes addressedtend to be remedial across programmes of study Digital literacy is embedded into the curriculum through a focus on blended learning course design in intensive development sessions
  • 18. 4. Development interventions Graduate attributes addressedtend to be remedial across programmes of study “The development of this postgraduate nursing programme is based upon the belief that eLearning offers accessible, flexible, modern learning methods aligned with the demands and expectations of 21st century professionals”.
  • 19. 4. Development interventions Graduate attributes addressedtend to be remedial across programmes of study
  • 20. 5. Technologies are introduced Curriculum modified by theaccording to the requirements of impacts of technology in thethe curriculum environment Atelier-D experimented with online design environment, social networking, use of virtual worlds, knowledge mapping, videoconferencing, per to peer assessments..
  • 21. 5. Technologies are introduced Curriculum modified by theaccording to the requirements of impacts of technology in thethe curriculum environment The project has informed the creation of a radically new, online course, ‘Design Thinking’.This was first presented in February 2010 and recruited 400 students...
  • 22. 5. Technologies are introduced Curriculum modified by theaccording to the requirements of impacts of technology in thethe curriculum environment The real challenge for institutions is... for students, researchers and teachers to thrive and excel in a digitally-enabled world. The programme is designed specifically to support the integration of digital capability into the core activities of educational institutions
  • 23. 6. Modular assessment: focus on Cross-modular assessment: focusachievement within clearly on learner development anddefined curriculum goals integration 4. Focuses on student development 4.1 When constructing my assessment How about YOU? submission I focus my effort on learning The ways I use assessment to support my (i.e. linking concepts together) rather than learning include… just presenting information. 4.2 When I receive feedback on my assessment I look carefully at the comments, advice and encouragement and do not just concentrate on my mark/grade. http://tinyurl.com/escape-project 4.3 I take the time to review my own assessment (self assessment) before and after I submit my work. 4.4 I make sure I identify the positive aspects of my own work as well as areas for improvement. 4.5 I ensure any misconceptions I have about my learning are voiced. ESCAPE Project Funded by the ESCAPE project principles of effective assessment applied to the internet age
  • 24. 6. Modular assessment: focus on Cross-modular assessment: focusachievement within clearly on learner development anddefined curriculum goals integration ESCAPE project principles of effective assessment applied to the internet age
  • 25. 6. Modular assessment: focus on Cross-modular assessment: focusachievement within clearly on learner development anddefined curriculum goals integration ‘We are seeing transformative changes to assessment practices in the modules that the ESCAPE team have worked with.There is a much greater emphasis on the application of assessment-for-learning approaches.The pedagogy is supported by the use of appropriate aligned technologies such as; use of student-produced videos, Podcasts, Blogs, electronic submission of coursework, use of StudyNet to support group work and the use of wikis.’ 
  • 26. 7. ‘Hidden curriculum’ Curriculum is transparent, richly described Learners describe their own curriculum Student-facing Rich course handbooks: representations constructive alignment supports Open content Course tasters: meaningful choices Student engagement Accessible info e.g. on mobile Capture of design Reflection, evidence of discussions - educational rationale
  • 27. 7. ‘Hidden curriculum’ Curriculum is transparent, richly described T-SPARC It is of the upmost importance that programme teams generate artefacts that emerge naturally from their design activity and that we avoid a situation whereby people are constructing evidence/artefacts for the sake of being seen to do so. ..our forthcoming ‘Rough Guide to Curriculum Design’ will reinforce this agenda.
  • 28. 7. ‘Hidden curriculum’ Learners describe their own curriculum Dynamic Learning Maps can be used to increase transparency in the curriculum in an interactive and participative way that more closely matches the changing experience and expectations of learners. It also has the potential to address drivers for PDP, employability, personalisation and student involvement in the curriculum.
  • 29. 8. Courses defined by content: Content is open, free, shared incontent associated with specific subject communities, andcourses e.g. in the VLE dissociated from specific courses
  • 30. 8. Courses defined by content: Content is open, free, shared incontent associated with specific subject communities, andcourses e.g. in the VLE dissociated from specific courses
  • 31. 8. Courses defined by content: Content is open, free, shared incontent associated with specific subject communities, andcourses e.g. in the VLE dissociated from specific courses • sharing ‘bite-sized’ and ‘in progress’ teaching resources encourages openness and cross-disciplinary sharing. • open content can support minority/threatened subject areas • community repository approach with Web 2.0 features maximises engagement and identification • humanities staff are eager to share but have anxieties about ‘inappropriate’ repurposing • an open but turnstile community develops trust which encourages sharing and feedback as a natural extension of existing practice
  • 32. 9. Personal resources for learning Shared knowledge resources,and study knowledge networks10. Learning about and for the Learning inside out and outside in‘outside world’ MoRSE • on placement • in the field • web 2.0 tech • GIS mash-up • collaborative mapping (twitter)
  • 33. 9. Personal resources for learning Shared knowledge resources,and study knowledge networks10. Learning about and for the Learning inside out and outside in‘outside world’ The mix of public and private tasks, and institutional and third party technologies, has been complex... all cohorts appreciated the role that personal technologies could play and there was enthusiastic engagement with the GIS collaborative mash-up.
  • 34. learning is transformed by...• Materials that fit learning into living (e.g. podcasts, e-books)• Practice of authentic tasks in authentic contexts• Tech-enhanced support for learning away from campus• Virtual environments for collaboration, demonstration, peer review (e.g. atelier settings)• Inquiry-based, case-based and problem-based learning• Recording and making learning visible (e-portfolio, digital TV)• Feedback/assessment that is timely, reviewed, clarifies expectations (e.g. audio feedback, links to online support)
  • 35. curriculum processes are transformed by...• Focusing on the learning experience holistically (graduate attributes, eportfolio, developing identities)• Assumption of open content• Trusted information with multiple representations• Transparent processes with shared artefacts, collaborative tools• Streamlined admin systems allowing...• focus on educational conversations, which can be...• captured and reflected on in meaningful ways• QA/QE oriented on negotiated, iterative enhancement
  • 36. institutions are transformed by...• New relationships with learners and potential learners not (yet) enrolled• Delivering learning beyond the campus• Diversification of professional roles• Developing sustainable dialogues with employers and professional bodies• Addressing digital literacy across the institution• The right ‘action poetry’
  • 37. technology per se does not...• create time• create money• create opportunity• offer resilience in uncertain times
  • 38. technology + educational (re)thinking + cultural change can...• transform learning• transform curriculum practices• transform learning organisations
  • 39. technology + educational (re)thinking + cultural change can...‘The project was about changing the culture andit was this that took time and effort.Similarly, using the technologies to respond tothe three key project themes was less a questionof the technology per se, but more to do with theways in which it was used within the particularenvironment, with the pedagogy and thesurrounding curriculum design.’ (INTEGRATE)
  • 40. tales around the campfire...