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Presentation to ELESIG in 2009 - outcomes of the LLiDA study

Presentation to ELESIG in 2009 - outcomes of the LLiDA study

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  • academic and web-based knowledge practices <br /> multimedia content creation/sharing and text-based academic content <br />
  • academic and web-based knowledge practices <br /> multimedia content creation/sharing and text-based academic content <br />
  • academic and web-based knowledge practices <br /> multimedia content creation/sharing and text-based academic content <br />
  • academic and web-based knowledge practices <br /> multimedia content creation/sharing and text-based academic content <br />
  • academic and web-based knowledge practices <br /> multimedia content creation/sharing and text-based academic content <br />
  • academic and web-based knowledge practices <br /> multimedia content creation/sharing and text-based academic content <br />
  • academic and web-based knowledge practices <br /> multimedia content creation/sharing and text-based academic content <br />

Learning literacies presentation ELESIG Learning literacies presentation ELESIG Presentation Transcript

  • Learning Literacies in a Digital Age (LLiDA) Findings + 'Learners of the Future' Helen Beetham Lou McGill Allison Littlejohn Small-scale JISC study Final report May 09 Joint Information Systems Committee 29/06/09 | | Slide 1
  • Three-pronged approach 1. Review available evidence (a)Current research into literacies (b)Conceptual and competency frameworks relevant to UK HE and FE (c)The changing context and requirements for learning and literacy 2. Investigate current provision in UK HE and FE institutions a) Institutional audits b) Best practice exemplars 3. Present conclusions a) Expert advisory group (institutional auditors, stakeholders) Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 2
  • Context: the 'post digital' vs the barely literate Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 3
  • Likely futures: educating graduates for...  economic uncertainty  high competition for employment in the global knowledge economy  increased alternative, contract-based and self-employment  the rise of inter-disciplinarity and multi-disciplinary work teams  a networked society and communities  multi-cultural working and living environments; internationalisation  blurring boundaries of real / virtual, public / private, work / leisure  increasingly ubiquitous and embedded digital technologies  increasing ubiquity, availability and reusability of digital knowledge  distribution of cognitive work into (human + non-human) networks of expertise  rapid social and techno-social change Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 4
  • as knowledge is increasingly accepted as being multi-modal, always potentially at least capable of digital capture and sharing, then the significance of 'the digital' as an environment for learning and working may recede Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 5
  • Present challenges facing learners  Learners over-estimate their information skills  Many lack general academic critical and inquiry skills  Most learners still strongly led by tutor / course practices  Most learners use only basic functionality, unwilling to explore or creatively appropriate technologies  Separate 'skills' support poorly engaged with, demotivating  Problems transferring skills from personal or social contexts to study or work  Potential clash of academic/internet knowledge cultures  Negative experiences of ICT in school Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 6
  • Findings: competence frameworks Joint Information Systems Committee 29/06/09 | | Slide 7
  • Competence frameworks academic and prof literacies critical thinking slow change, problem solving cultural and reflection institutional academic inhibitors writing note-taking concept mapping time management analysis, synthesis evaluation creativity, innovation self-directed learning collaborative learning information and media literacies searching and retrieving analysing, interpreting critiquing evaluating managing resources navigating info spaces content creation editing, repurposing enriching resources referencing sharing content Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 ICT literacies ICT skills change, rapid web skills economic and social networking techno-social using CMC drivers using TELE using digital devices word processing using databases analysis tools assistive tech personalisation … slide 8
  • Competence frameworks academic and prof literacies information and media literacies ICT literacies How knowledge and expertise are communicated How knowledge and expertise are applied in authentic tasks How individuals appropriate knowledge and expertise Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 9
  • Findings: current provision Joint Information Systems Committee 29/06/09 | | Slide 10
  • Current provision: strategies Reviewed 60 strategic documents from 16 participating insts  Only 2/60 address 'digital literacies' primarily  Information strategies most clearly focused on learner capabilities (influence of SCONUL 7 pillars model)  Employability widely referenced as a concept but poorly defined, rarely linked to specific interventions  Responsibility for' developing literacies split between academic staff and central services  Students rarely addressed as responsible actors Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 11
  • Current provision: services  Support in silos: library, learning development, ICT, WP...  Information literacy well supported but:  media literacy, e.g. critical reading and creative production  communicating and sharing ideas  use of innovative environments to explore ideas  Central service provision personal and developmental but rarely reaches learners engaged in authentic tasks  Little support for learners' personal use of ICT for study  'Employability' poorly articulated: careers staff hard to reach Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 12
  • Current provision: curriculum  provision tends to be one-off and cohort-based  staff perceive students as more digitally capable than they are  tutor skills critical to learners' development  feedback and assessment rarely used as opportunities  huge diversity in competences considered in design, validation  Three modes of integrating literacies: – Institution-wide programme, usually portfolio-based – Skills modules or sessions alongside 'subject' teaching – Fully integrated into modules / programmes of study  Most examples from vocational and professional courses... (but)  … deeply embedded examples perhaps not visible to our study Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 13
  • Current provision: peer support  Social software widely used for informal sharing and more organised peer support  Study buddy and student mentor initiatives rarely address digital literacies directly, but have scope to do so  Student help-desks commonly support learners' use of digital devices and networks  Much peer support takes place under the academic radar (but)  Academic staff attitudes and central service initiatives send important messages about what is appropriate Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 14
  • Recommendations Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 15
  • Recommendations (1) further research  How learners differ wrt technology use, impact on their learning experience  How learners develop technology-enabled strategies of learning and study  Themes: digital knowledge practice, personalisation, assessment, peer support, attitudes to risk  Institutional case studies – models and outcomes  Course level practices – impact of tutor skills and attitudes, integrated vs modular approach  Relating digital research and teaching (scholarship?)  ... Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 Learners’ slide 16
  • Recommendations (2): what do we wish for?  Learning, living and working are understood to take place in a digital society: there is no separate space of learning which is 'digital'  Learners are blending their own personal and shared learning environments  There is an entitlement to access and basic skills of learning in a digital age, plus a recognition of diverse needs and preferences for study  Literacies for learning are continually assessed and supported: the emphasis is on producing digitally capable lifelong learners  The focus is on what formal post-compulsory education can uniquely provide: – e.g. self-direction, self-awareness, depth of attention, a critical stance, apprenticeship in professional and academic practice, creativity and innovation, social entrepreneurialism... Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 17
  • From To We know, we teach you Learners' digital skills being recognised, rewarded and used as a resource for the learning community Established methods, based in disciplines Emerging and mixed methods, interdisciplinary problem spaces Induction and one-off training model of literacy support Ongoing review, progression and just-in-time support Students become 'qualified' in specific kinds of academic knowledge practice Students need to strategically manage a range of knowledge practices, for different contexts Technologies are introduced according to the requirements of the curriculum (Yes, and) the curriculum is continually modified by the impacts of technology in the environment Disaggregated services, deployed at particular points in the learning cycle (library, ICT, study skills, careers) Integrated support for students' learning development and different learning pathways Stable job market, 'employability' has clear features, particularly in specific vocations and professions Unstable job market: adaptability, resilience, multi-tasking, capacity to exercise judgement and management of multiple roles to the Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 fore slide 18
  • 'Learners of the future'  Define 3 key capabilities that 'learners of the future' will need  Express in these terms: a capable learner will be able to... – They may not be 'digital' capabilities but think about how they would be expressed in a digital age  What kind of interventions might support development of these capabilities? – Interventions may be focused on the curriculum, or on individual learners  How could we evaluate their impact and benefits? Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 19
  • Institutions will need to:  Reassess the capacities that are taught for, supported and assessed: – Digital participation, production and enquiry – Multiple modes of knowing, multiple media, multiple communities – Self-management of learning, career and reputation – Creativity, innovation and agility  Reassess how these capacities are supported – Peer learning, informal learning, 360 degree support and review – Authentic contexts for practice, including digitally-mediated contexts – Individual scaffolding and support – Making explicit community practices of knowledge and meaning-making – Anticipating and helping learners manage conflict between practice contexts – Recognising and helping learners integrate practices – Interdisciplinarity? Cross-contextual learning? Learner-generated contexts? Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 20
  • Institutions will need to:  Reassess and reassert how these capacities are valued – Transparency over processes and values – Recognition and reward (staff and student, cultural and financial) – Digital scholarship needs to saturate learning and teaching practice – Digital talent needs to be recognised and nurtured Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 21
  • Current provision: challenges for institutions  Work across curriculum / services boundaries to integrate provision  Respond to the need for new kinds of capability: recognise and represent graduate capabilities in new ways  Articulate vision for '21st century graduate skills' and embed ambition for students to thrive in C21st across the curriculum  Prepare themselves and their students for an uncertain future  Develop institution-wide approach to assessing and progressing learners' capabilities  Foster digital talent and innovation, wherever found (staff/students) Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 22
  • http://www.academy.gcal.ac.uk/llida/ Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 23
  • literacies relatively stable aspects of the person attributes strategies skills access changeable and contextrelated aspects of the person Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 24
  • literacy as common entitlement  a foundational knowledge or capability, such as reading, writing or numeracy, on which more specific skills depend  a cultural entitlement – a practice without which a learner is impoverished in relation to culturally valued knowledge Ensuring all learners have functional access to core technologies, services and devices; developing core literacies; building capacity to learn across the lifecourse. attributes strategies entitlement skills equality of access access Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 25
  • literacies as difference Enabling learners to  communication – expressing how an individual relates to culturally access and integrate significant communications enhancement in attributes a variety of media own technologies, expression of services, and learning  the need for practice – acquired through continued development and communities; difference strategies refinement in different contexts, rather than once-and-for-all mastery supporting the  a socially and culturally situated practice – often highly dependentof sociodevelopment on the technical practices; context in which it is carried out skills supporting  self-transformation - literacies (and their lack) have aachievement of lifelong, lifewide personal goals and impact access learning journeys.  an ongoing process which is never completed Learners’ Experiences of e-Learning Workshops: November 2008 – March 2009 slide 26