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Meeting Diverse Learner Needs Through Blended Learning Hazel Owen Clayton Young
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Meeting Diverse Learner Needs Through Blended Learning Hazel Owen Clayton Young

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This is a presentation that Clayton Young and I gave at the LED conference at the University of Waikato, NZ in 2007....

This is a presentation that Clayton Young and I gave at the LED conference at the University of Waikato, NZ in 2007.

Please cite as: Owen, H., & Young, C. (2007, November 21-24). Meeting diverse learner needs through blended learning. Paper presented at the Language, Education and Diversity Conference, The University of Waikato, Hamilton.

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  • Hazel Good afternoon – my name is Hazel Owen and this is my colleague, Clayton Young

Meeting Diverse Learner Needs Through Blended Learning Hazel Owen Clayton Young Meeting Diverse Learner Needs Through Blended Learning Hazel Owen Clayton Young Presentation Transcript

  • Meeting diverse learner needs through blended learning Hazel Owen ICT Enhanced Learning Consultant Clayton Young Dubai Men’s College
  • Overview of Presentation
    • The educational setting / students
    • Blended learning
    • The Research Skills and Projects (RS&P) Course
    • Results
    • Implications
    • Conclusion & questions
  • Educational Setting
    • Dubai Men’s College (DMC)
    • Students
      • - Age
      • Gender
      • Nationality
      • - ICT skills
  • Problems
    • Changes during transition from
    • secondary to tertiary:
    • Language / medium of instruction
    • Education / Academic ‘culture’
      • Educational expectations
      • Teaching & learning styles
      • Self-directed independent learning
  • Expectations After Graduation
    • “… high levels of literacy and critical thinking skills” (Murchu & Muirhead, 2005)
    • “ skills, competencies, understandings and attributes which equip them to be innovative” (Newman, 2000)
    • Make “meaning for themselves from input, data and ideas” (Hughes, Kooy, & Kanevsky, 1997)
    • Problem solving / project management
    • Transferable competencies
  • Research Skills and Projects English Math Computer Arabic ICT Learning Strategies ICT Learning Strategies ICT Learning Strategies ICT Learning Strategies ICT Learning Strategies ICT Learning Strategies ICT Learning Strategies Learner independence Learner independence Learner independence Learner independence Awareness Assessment Consolidation Learner independence Learner independence Learner independence
  • Sociocultural Theory
    • Learning - social interaction of individual with external social world
    • A shift in dynamic away from learners interacting “ with computers to interacting with other humans via the computer”
    • (Warschauer & Kern, 2000, p. 11)
    • ZPD / Scaffolded learning
  • Zone of Proximal Development Johnson, E. M. (2001). Sociocultural principles and instructional design. Paper presented at Computer Assisted Language Learning in the Classroom, University of Waikato, Hamilton, NZ.
  • Concept Model Heinze and Procter (2004)
  • Design of RS&P
    • Participant “training” -> learner independence
    • Face-to-face classroom sessions + tools, documents, models, examples, instructions, and rubrics
    • Variety of formats and media - different learning styles (Fleming & Bonwell, 1998)
  •  
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  • Experiential Learning
    • Four projects over 40 weeks
    • Cumulative skills + learn, revise and recycle skills
    • Iterative cycle : skills taught / assimilated –> zero tolerance  0 grade –> reflection –> next project experience applied ->
    • Each project is less scaffolded
  • Fostering Skills & Strategies
    • Referencing, paraphrasing & summarising
    • Evaluating and analysing sources
    • Following instructions
    • Problem solving
    • Planning & prioritising
    • Time management
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  • Tools and Support
    • Learning Center
    • NoodleBib / ‘how to’ videos
    • Models / examples online
    • Instructions and rubrics online
    • Translation of key concepts into Arabic
    • Suggested sources
  •  
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  • Design of Assessments
    • Very clear aims (rubric available)
    • Clear instructions
      • Written / videos / PowerPoint / oral
      • MSN / WebCT discussion forums
    • Students collect authentic research data
      • Sources inc. personal interviews & emails
      • Projects inc. off campus tasks
    • Focus on process rather than end product
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  • Data Collection
    • 860 HDF students over 4 years
    • Semi-structured interviews /observations
    • Objects produced during the RS&P course;
    • Questionnaires
    • Email, interpersonal communication
    • Results
    • Usage statistics - WebCT
  • Specific Comments-Students
    • “ Web site was hard but interesting.”
    • “ Presentation was the easiest and it was better because we’ll use it in job.”
    • “ Revision of vocabulary…we use it every day. We learn a lot by revision and use it…the word. We shouldn’t memories because don’t learn it properly.”
  • Specific Comments:Teachers
    • “ Technology on its own improves nothing. The use of technology is what is important.”
    • “ The course has a coherent flow and is appropriate for our students.”
  • Is RS&P effective?
  • Is RS&P effective?
  • Is RS&P effective?
  • Is RS&P effective?
    • 10 % reduction in grades for submission of assignments late on the due date
    • 30 % on the day following the due date
    • 60 % for two days late and ‘zero’ for 3 days late
    • Fairly graded?
    • 87% of students agreed the teachers graded their work fairly
  • Significance of Findings
    • Limitations:
        • reliability, validity and generalisability
    • Role of the ‘teacher’ and the students
    • Blended learning - high perceived value / still enough familiarity
    • Supported shift toward self-directed learning
    • Issue of choice (motivation)
  • Implications CRSP Learning in real-world contexts Transferable skills Investigational work Problem solving Small group work Analysis and interpretation tasks
  • Conclusion
    • Skills => recycled => retention
    • Transferable skills
    • Ongoing research (Chun & Plass, 2000; Brett, n.d; Chun & Plass, 2000)
    • Course flexible – applicable to all tertiary educational contexts
  • Conclusion
    • Ongoing research (Chun & Plass, 2000; Brett, n.d; Chun & Plass, 2000)
    • Course flexible – applicable to all tertiary educational contexts
    • Education technology - a tool
  • Thank you for listening
    • [email_address]
    • [email_address]
    • Are there any questions?