Our Solar System

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  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/science/environment_earth_universe/astronomy_space/revise2.shtml
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/science/environment_earth_universe/astronomy_space/revise2.shtml
  • http://www.aerospaceguide.net/solar_system/index.html
  • http://space.about.com/od/solarsystem/ss/visualtourss.htm
  • Picture from: http://www.universetoday.com/50287/terrestrial-planets/
  • Picture from: http://astronomy.nmsu.edu/aklypin/WebSite/new_page_10.htm
  • http://www.solarviews.com/eng/asteroid.htm
  • Picture and information from: http://nineplanets.org/comets.html
  • http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Meteors
  • http://presolar.wustl.edu/work/idp.html
  • Our Solar System

    1. 1. Our Solar System<br />Rebecca Haywood<br />Central Michigan University<br />EDU 290<br />
    2. 2.
    3. 3. Our Solar System<br />Our Solar System consists of:<br /> -the Sun <br /> -8 planets and their moons <br /> -dwarf planets <br /> -asteroids<br /> -Kuiperbelt objects<br /> -Oort Cloud<br /> -comets<br /> -meteoroids<br /> -interplanetary dust<br />
    4. 4. The Sun<br />The largest object in the solar system<br />Contains 99.8% if the Solar System’s total mass<br />4.6 billion years old<br />It’s strong gravitational pull holds all the planets in orbit<br />
    5. 5. The Planets<br />8 total<br />Mars, Venus, Earth, Mercury, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune<br />Two categories<br />Terrestrial Planets<br />Jovian Planets<br />
    6. 6. The Terrestrial Planets<br />“Earth-like”<br />Mars, Venus, Earth, and Mercury<br />
    7. 7. The Jovian Planets<br />“Jupiter-like”<br />Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune<br />
    8. 8. Moons<br />Terrestrial Planets<br />Mercury- 0 moons<br />Venus- 0 moons<br />Earth- 1 moon<br />Mars- 2 moons<br />Jovian Planets<br />Jupiter- 63 moons<br />Saturn- 61 moons<br />Uranus- 27 moons<br />Neptune- 13 moons<br />
    9. 9. Asteroids<br />Rocky, metallic objects that orbit the Sun<br />Too small to be considered planets<br />Can range in size from 1,000 km to the size of pebbles<br />Most asteroids are found in the Asteroid Belt<br />Between Mercury and Jupiter<br />
    10. 10. Comets<br />Made of frozen gas and frozen water<br />Invisible except when near the Sun<br />Their orbits take them far outside the orbit of Pluto<br />Most are located in the Oort Cloud<br />
    11. 11. Meteoroids<br />Little chunks of rock and debris in space<br />Become meteors (shooting stars) when the fall through a planet’s atmosphere. <br />Chunks that hit the ground are called meteorites <br />
    12. 12. Interplanetary Dust<br />Formed in the chemical reactions of interstellar molecular clouds<br />Nitrogen and deuterium enrichments<br />
    13. 13. References<br />http://www.aerospaceguide.net/solar_system/index.html<br />http://space.about.com/od/solarsystem/ss/visualtourss.htm<br />http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/science/environment_earth_universe/astronomy_space/revise2.shtml<br />http://www.universetoday.com/50287/terrestrial-planets/<br />http://astronomy.nmsu.edu/aklypin/WebSite/new_page_10.htm<br />http://www.solarviews.com/eng/asteroid.htm<br />http://nineplanets.org/comets.html<br />http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Meteors<br />http://presolar.wustl.edu/work/idp.html<br />

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