Source relability research
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Source relability research Presentation Transcript

  • 1. ResearchResearchThis is not as bad as you think!This is not as bad as you think!Glad you are here to learn in yourGlad you are here to learn in yourOHS LibraryOHS Library 
  • 2. Evaluating Web sourcesEvaluating Web sourcesAuthor (authority/qualifications)Author (authority/qualifications) Does the Web site or document have anDoes the Web site or document have anauthor? You may need to do some clickingauthor? You may need to do some clickingand scrolling to find the author’s name. Ifand scrolling to find the author’s name. Ifyou have landed directly on an internalyou have landed directly on an internalpage of a site, for example, you may needpage of a site, for example, you may needto navigate to the home page or find anto navigate to the home page or find an“about this site” link to learn the name of“about this site” link to learn the name ofthe author.the author.
  • 3. Evaluating Web sourcesEvaluating Web sourcesAuthor (authority/qualifications)Author (authority/qualifications) If there is an author, can you tell whetherIf there is an author, can you tell whetherhe or she is knowledgeable and credible?he or she is knowledgeable and credible?When the author’s qualifications aren’tWhen the author’s qualifications aren’tlisted on the site itself, look for links to thelisted on the site itself, look for links to theauthor’s home page, which may provideauthor’s home page, which may provideevidence of his or her interests andevidence of his or her interests andexpertise.expertise.
  • 4. Evaluating Web sourcesEvaluating Web sourcesCurrencyCurrency How current is the site? Check for the dateHow current is the site? Check for the dateof publication or the latest update, oftenof publication or the latest update, oftenlocated at the bottom of the home page orlocated at the bottom of the home page orat the beginning or end of an internalat the beginning or end of an internalpage.page. How current are the site’s links? If many ofHow current are the site’s links? If many ofthe links no longer work, the site may bethe links no longer work, the site may betoo dated for your purposes.too dated for your purposes.
  • 5. Evaluating Web sourcesEvaluating Web sourcesPurpose and audiencePurpose and audience Why was the site created: To argue aWhy was the site created: To argue aposition? To sell a product? To informposition? To sell a product? To informreaders?readers? Who is the site’s intended audience?Who is the site’s intended audience?
  • 6. Evaluating Web sourcesEvaluating Web sourcesSponsorship (bias)Sponsorship (bias) Who, if anyone, sponsors the site? TheWho, if anyone, sponsors the site? Thesponsor of a site is often named andsponsor of a site is often named anddescribed on the home page.described on the home page.
  • 7. Evaluating Web sourcesEvaluating Web sourcesSponsorship (bias)Sponsorship (bias) What does the URL tell you? The domainWhat does the URL tell you? The domainname extension often indicates the type ofname extension often indicates the type ofgroup hosting the site: commercial (.com),group hosting the site: commercial (.com),educational (.edu), nonprofit (.org),educational (.edu), nonprofit (.org),governmental (.gov), military (.mil), orgovernmental (.gov), military (.mil), ornetwork (.net). URLs may also indicate anetwork (.net). URLs may also indicate acountry of origin: .uk (United Kingdom)country of origin: .uk (United Kingdom)or .jp (Japan), for instance.or .jp (Japan), for instance.
  • 8. Be SMARTBe SMART S = See if the authors have authorityS = See if the authors have authority M = Many sites give outdated informationM = Many sites give outdated information A = A specific audience may be targetedA = A specific audience may be targeted R = Reliability helps determine accuracyR = Reliability helps determine accuracy T = Try to determine if information isT = Try to determine if information isunbiasedunbiased
  • 9. Evaluating Web sourcesEvaluating Web sources http://www.ovaprima.org/index.htmhttp://www.ovaprima.org/index.htm VsVs http://www.jfklibrary.org/http://www.jfklibrary.org/
  • 10. Kinds of SourcesKinds of Sources PrimaryPrimary SecondarySecondary
  • 11. Primary SourcesPrimary Sources Primary sources are “original recordsPrimary sources are “original recordscreated at the time historical eventscreated at the time historical eventsoccurred or well after events in the form ofoccurred or well after events in the form ofmemoirs and oral histories.” memoirs and oral histories.”  Some examples of primary sources mightSome examples of primary sources mightbe:  serials (journals, magazines,be:  serials (journals, magazines, etcetc.),.),government documents, memoirs,government documents, memoirs,artifacts, photos, and even works of art.artifacts, photos, and even works of art.~~The American Library AssociationThe American Library Association
  • 12. Primary SourcesPrimary Sources Primary sources “enable the researcher toPrimary sources “enable the researcher toget as close as possible to what actuallyget as close as possible to what actuallyhappened during a historical event or timehappened during a historical event or timeperiod. A primary source reflects theperiod. A primary source reflects theindividual viewpoint of a participant orindividual viewpoint of a participant orobserver.”observer.”~American Library Association~American Library Association
  • 13. Primary SourcesPrimary Sources Primary sources “are the raw materials ofPrimary sources “are the raw materials ofhistory — original documents and objectshistory — original documents and objectswhich were created at the time underwhich were created at the time understudy.”study.”~The Library of Congress~The Library of Congress Firsthand experience or accountFirsthand experience or account
  • 14. Primary SourcePrimary Source
  • 15. Secondary SourcesSecondary Sources Secondary sources are sources such asSecondary sources are sources such ashistory books, encyclopedias, articles andhistory books, encyclopedias, articles andwebsiteswebsites secondary sources are accounts orsecondary sources are accounts orinterpretations of events created byinterpretations of events created bysomeone without firsthand experience.someone without firsthand experience.
  • 16. Secondary SourcesSecondary Sources
  • 17. Secondary SourcesSecondary Sources Sources that digest, analyze, evaluate andSources that digest, analyze, evaluate andinterpret the information contained withininterpret the information contained withinprimary sources.primary sources. Often scholarly journal articles and books.Often scholarly journal articles and books.
  • 18. How do I know the difference?How do I know the difference? Timing of the event recordedTiming of the event recorded --If the article--If the articlewas composed close to the time of the eventwas composed close to the time of the eventrecorded, chances are it is primary material.  Forrecorded, chances are it is primary material.  Forinstance, a letter  written by a soldier during theinstance, a letter  written by a soldier during theVietnam War is primary material, as is an articleVietnam War is primary material, as is an articlewritten in the newspaper or a soldiers letterwritten in the newspaper or a soldiers letterhome during the Civil War.  However, an articlehome during the Civil War.  However, an articlewritten analyzing the results of the battle atwritten analyzing the results of the battle atGettysburg is secondary material. Gettysburg is secondary material. 
  • 19. How do I know the difference?How do I know the difference? Rhetorical aim of the written itemRhetorical aim of the written item ----Often, an item that is written with aOften, an item that is written with apersuasive, or analytical, aim is secondarypersuasive, or analytical, aim is secondarymaterial.   These materials have digestedmaterial.   These materials have digestedand interpreted the event, rather thanand interpreted the event, rather thanreported on it.reported on it.
  • 20. Giving credit where credit is dueGiving credit where credit is due Credit thoughts, ideas, or words that areCredit thoughts, ideas, or words that arenot YOUR OWN!not YOUR OWN! Use the citation format required by yourUse the citation format required by yourteacherteacher
  • 21. Giving credit where credit is dueGiving credit where credit is due Essential information to find from sourceEssential information to find from sourceto give credit:to give credit:– AuthorAuthor– Book or magazine titleBook or magazine title– Article titleArticle title– PublisherPublisher– Place of publicationPlace of publication– Date of publicationDate of publication– Date of access (internet sources)Date of access (internet sources)
  • 22. Giving credit where credit is dueGiving credit where credit is due TEL resources have citation information atTEL resources have citation information atthe bottom of the article.the bottom of the article. It is up to you to put that information intoIt is up to you to put that information intothe format required by your teacher.the format required by your teacher. Gilje, Paul A. "Patrick Henry: First AmongGilje, Paul A. "Patrick Henry: First AmongPatriots."Patriots." The HistorianThe Historian 74.4 (2012):74.4 (2012):842+.842+. Student Resources In ContextStudent Resources In Context..Web. 22 Mar. 2013.Web. 22 Mar. 2013.
  • 23. Giving credit where credit is dueGiving credit where credit is due Gilje, Paul A. "Patrick Henry: First AmongGilje, Paul A. "Patrick Henry: First AmongPatriots."Patriots." The HistorianThe Historian 74.4 (2012):74.4 (2012):842+.842+. Student Resources In ContextStudent Resources In Context..Web. 22 Mar. 2013.Web. 22 Mar. 2013.