Interdiciplinary Unit
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Interdiciplinary Unit

on

  • 1,320 views

HS student lesson - interdiciplinary

HS student lesson - interdiciplinary

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,320
Views on SlideShare
1,316
Embed Views
4

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 4

http://www.linkedin.com 3
http://www.lmodules.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Interdiciplinary Unit Document Transcript

  • 1. Interdisciplinary Unit Jamestown Settlement, Virginia Introduction This interdisciplinary unit provides four instructional plans created at a point where all of the students have been studying various aspects of the history of Jamestown in honor of its 400th anniversary. They all have some knowledge and background regarding many aspects of the people, circumstances, and culture at that time. The content crosses Art, English, Government, History, Economics, and Music instruction in the theme of the colonization of the Jamestown Settlement. May 24, 2007 Amy Basaraba Carmen Chase Ava Dowdy Steve Ortiz
  • 2. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 Table of Contents Introduction.....................................................................................................1 Lesson: Good Citizenship Then and Now ....................................................4 Lesson Summary ..................................................................................4 Lesson Goals ........................................................................................4 Instructional Approaches ......................................................................5 Lesson Content .....................................................................................6 Adaptations for Special Needs .............................................................8 Assessment...........................................................................................9 References..........................................................................................11 Appendix A - Notable People in the founding of Jamestown Colony.12 Appendix B - Where do you stand?....................................................13 Appendix C - Where I Stand ...............................................................14 Lesson: A Jamestown Settler’s Diary .........................................................15 Objectives ...........................................................................................15 Standards............................................................................................15 Instructional Approach ........................................................................16 Procedure Learning Activities ...........................................................16 Assessment.........................................................................................19 Adaptations for Special Needs ...........................................................22 Lesson: Jamestown Settlement in Art ........................................................23 Goals and Objective............................................................................23 Instructional Approach ........................................................................24 Content................................................................................................24 Adaptations for Special Needs ...........................................................25 Assessment.........................................................................................25 Follow-up Lesson and Assessment ....................................................25 Lesson: Jamestown Settlement in Music....................................................26
  • 3. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 Goals and Objectives..........................................................................26 Instructional Approach ........................................................................27 Content................................................................................................28 Adaptations for Special Needs ...........................................................28 Assessment.........................................................................................28 Grading Rubric for Portrait and PowerPoint .......................................29 Grading Rubric for Choral Music and PowerPoint..............................30 Grading Rubric for Percussion and PowerPoint .................................31 References..........................................................................................32 Lesson: Jamestown as an Economic Model; the Virginia Company of London..........................................................................................................34 Goals/Objectives .................................................................................34 Instructional Approach ........................................................................35 Procedure Learning Activities ...........................................................36 Internet Resources..............................................................................37 Other resources ..................................................................................37 Recommendations to Student Groups ...............................................38 Assessment.........................................................................................38 Adaptations for Diverse Learners .......................................................40
  • 4. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 4 Lesson: Good Citizenship Then and Now Subject Area Civic Education Grade 11/12 State Standards Virginia Duration of Lesson 90 minutes Creator Amy Basaraba Lesson Summary In this 90-minute lesson, students will read, discuss, and write about the concept of good citizenship based on the biographies and critical thinking questions contained in the Internet site Jamestown 1607-2007: Every American should stand here. Students will collaborate as a class and in small groups, as well as work independently, in order to develop a personal meaning of good citizenship while respecting the personal meanings arrived at by their classmates. By using a combination of lower-level and upper-level cognitive skills, students will be able to take a stand on important issues and defend their stances with factual evidence. By the end of this lesson, students should understand the importance of connecting the past to the present; finding the similarities in seemingly different people; and embracing the responsibility of being a good citizen in order to promote peaceful and productive co-existence. Lesson Goals 1. Students will use the Web site Jamestown 1607-2007: Every American should stand here once to read about Europeans, Africans, and American Indians who played roles in the establishment of the Jamestown colony. [English Standard of Learning 12.4 “The student will read and analyze a variety of informational materials, including electronic sources” (p.10)]. 2. Students will learn the names and describe the relevant facts of European men and women, African men and women and American Indian men and women who played roles in the establishment of the Jamestown colony [Virginia and US
  • 5. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 5 History Standard VUS2 “The student will describe how early European exploration and colonization resulted in cultural interactions among Europeans, Africans and American Indians” (p. 7)]. 3. Students will discuss the divergent points of view held by the Europeans, Africans and American Indians regarding land ownership, political organization and the need for survival during the establishment of the Jamestown colony (Virginia and US Government Standard of Learning GOVT.11d “The student will demonstrate knowledge of civil liberties and civil rights by exploring the balance between individual liberties and the public interest” (p. 12)]. 4. Students will engage in critical thinking to discuss and debate political and social issues that existed in 1607 and still exist today [Virginia and US History Standard of Learning VUS.1f “The student will demonstrate skills for historical and geographical analysis, including the ability to develop skills in discussion, debate and persuasive writing with respect to enduring issues and determine how divergent viewpoints have been addressed and reconciled” (p. 7)]. 5. Students will write a three-paragraph, one-page short essay on one political or social issue of personal interest, summarizing the intra-group debate that took place and defending a personal opinion on the issue [Virginia and US Government Standard for Learning GOVT.1g “The student will demonstrate mastery of the social studies skills which citizenship requires, including the ability to select and defend positions in writing, discussion and debate” (p. 11)]. Instructional Approaches In the introduction of the lesson, the teacher will use a conceptual approach. The general theme of the lesson is citizenship. Students will be asked to consider what physical and psychological characteristics determine good citizenship. As students complete the computer-based activity of the lesson, the teacher will use a skill-based instructional approach. Students will need to focus on reading and categorization skills to be successful.
  • 6. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 6 During the small-group discussion segment of the lesson, the teacher will use an inquiry and exploration instructional approach. In small groups, students will discuss and debate social and political issues, with each group choosing their topics of interest and following their distinct discussions. Finally, in the independent segment of the lessons, the teacher will use an interdisciplinary instructional approach. Students will need to synthesize their new knowledge with previously known information. They will combine information they read with information they discuss. They will synthesize their social and political views in a well-written short essay. They will organize facts and opinions to take a stand on an issue in a logical, defendable manner. Lesson Content Introduction of lesson (15 minutes) As a class, students will discuss the concept of good citizenship. Teacher should facilitate the discussion with the following questions: • What physical evidence exists when good citizenship is practiced? • What psychological/emotional evidence exists when good citizenship is practiced? • What responsibilities does a good citizen have? Are these specific to the US culture or are there universal responsibilities that are present despite the type of government in place? The teacher will introduce the lesson of the day, in which students will focus on the meaning of citizenship and good citizenship to the Europeans, Africans, and American Indians who were affected by the founding of the Jamestown colony in 1607. • The class will divide into groups of 4-5 students. Groups must have diversity in the student members (i.e., mixed genders and ethnicities). • Each group will receive a “Notable People in the founding of the Jamestown Colony” worksheet, found in Appendix A, to be completed using the Internet site Jamestown 1607-2007: Every American should stand here.
  • 7. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 7 • Each group will receive a “Where do you stand?” worksheet, found in Appendix B, containing discussion questions provided by the Internet site Jamestown 1607-2007: Every American should stand here. • Each student will receive a “Where I stand” worksheet, found in Appendix C, in which they will write summaries of the issues they discussed during the lesson which have personal meaning to them. Students do not have to complete the three activities of this lesson in the order they are described below. The reading activity may be completed at any time during the class period, depending on the number of Internet-ready computers available. The group discussion activity must be completed before the individual writing activity. Reading Activity (25 minutes) Students will use a computer to access the Internet site Jamestown 1607-2007: Every American should stand here, found at www.jamestown1607.org/ By reading the short biographies of the persons described on this site, students will complete the “Notable People in the founding of the Jamestown Colony” worksheet, found in Appendix A. Students will categorize the 12 of the 24 people of this site by gender and ethnicity, making sure that all categories on the worksheet contain at least one name. As a group, they will also decide which detail in each biography is the most “interesting tidbit” about each person. Each group will complete one worksheet. Each member of each group should take on one of the roles listed below. Each group should briefly discuss the strengths of each member, as different skills are required for each role, in order for the group to work most efficiently and effectively through this exercise. • The computer techie will use the mouse to open, close, and scroll through the biographies on the Web site. • The reader will read the text of the biographies aloud to the group in a way that facilitates the group’s understanding and the completion of the worksheet activity. • The recorder will write down the answers provided by the group on the worksheet in a neat, legible, and organized manner.
  • 8. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 8 • The time and task manager will supervise the time the group takes to work through the activity, making sure that the entire activity is completed in the maximum allotted time of 25 minutes. Group Discussion Activity (15 minutes) Each group of students will read the list of five discussion questions provided on the “Where do you stand?” worksheet, found in Appendix B and choose two to discuss among themselves. For each topic and during each intra-group discussion, each student should take his or her own notes to answer the following questions: 1. What is the topic? 2. Why was this “a hot topic” in 1607 in the Jamestown Colony? 3. What do my teammates have to say about the relevance of this topic today? Individual Writing Activity (30 minutes) After finishing the group discussion activity, each student will individually reflect upon what was said, choose the one topic/issue discussed that was more personally relevant, and complete the “Where I stand” worksheet, found in Appendix C. Adaptations for Special Needs This lesson can be adapted in several ways to ensure that students with special needs are able to participate and benefit from the lessons contained here. If more time is needed to complete the three activities, the reading activity can be completed in one class session and the discussion and writing can be completed in a separate class session. In the event that the lesson must be completed in one 90-minute session, the number of names that must be categorized on the reading worksheet can be diminished. Similarly, in the case of gifted students, the number of names may be increased up to the 24 names on the Web site. Another option is to leave the writing activity for homework, to be turned in the following class meeting. The expectations of the final section of the worksheet can be augmented for advanced students to include additional research and a more formal development of the personal stance.
  • 9. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 9 If a student cannot collaborate due to physical or mental conditions, the reading activity can be completed on an individual basis or in pairs instead of small groups. The discussion can be completed with an adult in whom the student has confidence or a special communicative relationship. Finally, if a student is not able to express himself in writing, due to a physical or a language barrier, his personal opinion of a particular issue can be expressed verbally or through a drawing depicting the student’s agreement or disagreement with the issue. See also pages 25, 28, and 40. Assessment Informal Assessment Each group of students will use the following checklist to make sure that the reading activity has been completed successfully. The teacher will write the following points on the board or project a transparency of the following points in place visible to all of the students until all groups have completed the reading activity.
  • 10. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 0 Reading Activity Checklist Before your group uses the computer, make sure: all of the members can see the computer screen you have a pencil or pen (not red) to write with you have an eraser or liquid corrector to make changes to your answers you note the start time and maximum finishing time in the upper right corner of the worksheet (each group has a maximum of 25 minutes on the computer) While your group is using the computer, make sure: each member of the group has been assigned one of the roles (computer techie, reader, recorder, time and task manager) for this activity each member of the group is paying attention and participating each member of the group is allowed to collaborate and help determine the right answers you are not looking at any Web page other than the one required to complete the assignment After your group finishes using the computer, make sure: the first and last names of all the members of the group are written at the top of the worksheet there are at least 12 names of people related to the founding of the Jamestown Colony written on the worksheet all of the categories of people contain at least one name all of the people you chose to add to your worksheet also have an interesting tidbit of information written alongside the corresponding name all of the names of the people are spelled correctly the person who was the Recorder for your group turns in your group’s worksheet before leaving the classroom Formal Assessment When grading the writing activity, the teacher will use a three-point scale to objectively assign grades to each student’s individual work. The suggested rubric for grading the students’ individual work is to score each element as “exceeds expectations”, “meets expectations” and “does not meet expectations”. The elements that should be considered in grading individual work are the following: I. Fluency (what the student has to say as it relates to the assignment objectives) 1. All three questions have an answer. 2. The responses answer the questions posed.
  • 11. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 1 3. The responses contain the information specifically required by the instructions following the question. II. Fluidity (how the student expresses himself/herself in writing) 4. The responses contain complete sentences. There is no use of sentence fragments or sentence run-ons. 5. The student acknowledges third persons when including ideas of others in the responses. 6. The student acknowledges his or her unique ideas and supports them with solid details or information, proving to be well informed and confident. III. Form (the quality of the mechanics and aesthetics of the written work) 7. Punctuation is used correctly. 8. Spelling is accurate. 9. Word choice is appropriate. 10. Handwriting is legible. 11. The overall appearance of the worksheet is neat and clean. References Virginia Department of Education. (2006). History/Social science standards for learning: Secondary. Retrieved May 17, 2007, from http://www.pen.k12.va.us/VDOE/ Superintendent/Sols/historysecondary.pdf Virginia Department of Education. (2006). English standards for learning: Secondary. Retrieved May 17, 2007, from http://www.pen.k12.va.us/VDOE/ Superintendent/Sols/2002/EnglishSecondary.pdf Virginia Tourism Corporation. (2007). Jamestown 1607-2007: Every American should stand here once. Retrieved May 9, 2007, from http://www.jamestown1607.org/
  • 12. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 2 Appendix A - Notable People in the founding of Jamestown Colony European Men European Women (Example) John Smith was imprisoned by both the European settlers and by the American Indians. African Men African Women American Indian Men American Indian Women
  • 13. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 3 Appendix B - Where do you stand? Instructions: As a group, read each of the questions below. Via group consensus, choose TWO of the questions to discuss and debate. All members of the group must participate in the discussion and all opinions and ideas must be heard and respected. It is not necessary that the group reach a consensual opinion on the topic. Each member of the team needs to take notes on what is said during the discussion. Notes can be jotted down in your notebooks or on loose-leaf paper. They will not be handed in for a grade but they are necessary to complete the writing activity that follows. NOTE: You will not be allowed to consult with your teammates when you are completing the writing activity, so do not make the mistake of skipping this instruction! • What is the topic? • Why was this “a hot topic” in 1607 in the Jamestown Colony? (HINT: Use your background knowledge of general Colonial America to discuss this). • What do my teammates have to say about the relevance of this topic in today’s world? Discussion Questions: 1. (from Angelo’s biography) In the earliest days of racial co-existence, how would you have endured? 2. (from John Martin’s biography) How would you handle a man [or woman] you thought contributed to the death of one of your own [someone very close to you]? 3. (from Mistress Forrest’s biography) What contemporary women are pioneers in leading social and democratic change? Is there a strong woman leader in your life? 4. (from Christopher Newport’s biography) What makes someone a leader? Do you have it? Can it be taught? 5. (From Powhatan’s biography) How would you handle a newcomer trying to take over your territory?
  • 14. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 4 Appendix C - Where I Stand ______________________________________________ (Write your topic on the title line above.) What was the relevance of this topic 400 years ago? What is the relevance of this topic today? Use specific examples offered during your group discussion. What stand do you take on this topic? Give three logical reasons that defend your position. These reasons must be in the form of factual evidence or concrete examples.
  • 15. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 5 Lesson: A Jamestown Settler’s Diary Content Area(s) English Language Arts Virginia and World History Computer/Technology Creator Carmen Chase Grade Level High School 11/12 Grade Time Frame Four Instructional Periods Objectives Students will research the lives of the Jamestown settlers, their voyage to America, their lives in the colony, and the role of economics and politics within the settlers’ lives. Students will use informal writing to develop a diary for an early settler of Jamestown, Virginia based on research. Standards ELA 12.4. The student will read and analyze a variety of informational materials, including electronic resources. ELA 12.7 The student will develop expository and informational writings. a) Generate, gather, and organize ideas for writing. b) Consider audience and purpose when planning for writing. c) Write analytically about literary, informational, and visual materials. d) Elaborate ideas clearly and accurately. e) Revise writing for depth of information and technique of presentation. f) Apply grammatical conventions to edit writing for correct use of language, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. g) Proofread final copy and prepare document for publication or submission. ELA 12.8 E. Cite sources of information, using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  • 16. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 6 VUS 1. The student will demonstrate skills for historical and geographical analysis, including the ability to a) identify, analyze, and interpret primary and secondary source documents, records, and data, including artifacts, diaries, letters, photographs, journals, newspapers, historical accounts, and art to increase understanding of events and life in the United States; b) evaluate the authenticity, authority, and credibility of sources; c) formulate historical questions and defend findings based on inquiry and interpretation; d) develop perspectives of time and place, including the construction of maps and various time lines of events, periods, and personalities in American history; e) communicate findings orally and in analytical essays and/or comprehensive papers; h) Interpret the significance of excerpts from famous speeches and other documents. Instructional Approach In this lesson, the students will be introduced to the early settlers of Jamestown with a PowerPoint presentation and a discussion on each person. The students will then work independently to research the period and the people of the settlement of Jamestown via internet. After researching Jamestown settlement history, students will draft three diary entries of a figure from this era. Peer review will be used for the revision process. Finally, students will use Microsoft Word to draft final copies of the project with a works cited page. Procedure Learning Activities Day 1: The teacher will introduce various settlers and founders of Jamestown via LCD display of the website http://www.jamestown1607.org/, connecting this portion of
  • 17. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 7 ELA to grade-12 history unit on the early settlement of Jamestown. Both classes will be working in concert to aid informational retention of the early Jamestown settlement (This segment will occupy the first 40 minutes of class). Students will begin to research various settlers/founders of Jamestown independently via the following internet sites. o http://www.jamestown1607.org/ o http://www.virtualjamestown.org/newspapers.html o http://www.historyisfun.org/chronicles/ o http://www.historyisfun.org/Curriculum-Materials.htm By the end of class, students will have either chosen a historical figure for which to write three diary entries of an important event within the figure’s life, or an important historical event from the history of the early settlement of Jamestown to write a diary excerpt from the vantage point of a fictional settler. Day 2: Students will research (using internet resources) the event during the early settlement of Jamestown that he or she has chosen to depict. Students will gather information and record sources by beginning a works cited page. Students may use the website www.citationmachine.net to develop the works cited page. Note: students should not print this page but save the page instead for attachment to the final project. Students will begin drafting the three diary entries and complete the drafts for homework. Day 3: Peer Review: Students partners will review each other’s drafts aiding with grammatical errors, punctuation, stylistic effects, and historical accuracy. Peer review sheets will be used to record revision suggestions and student work (beginning 40 minutes of class). Students will revise drafts (last 40 minutes of class). Day 4: Students will type their final copies and attach the works cited page.
  • 18. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 8 Diary entries and works cited pages are due at the end of class.
  • 19. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 1 9 Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to form research notes, accurately record sources, review peer work with accuracy, and develop a final draft with historically accurate content, correct grammar and punctuation, development and style of content, and use of research skills. The following assessment rubric will be used. Research Notes 5 4 3 2 1 0 Research Research notes Research notes Research notes Research notes Research Research Notes are concise, fully are well contain most contain some notes are not notes were developed, and developed and content content developed or not made. accurate with accurate with necessary for necessary for do not resource citation. resource citation. development of development of contain project with project with most resource resource citation. resource citation citation. but less accuracy.
  • 20. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 0 Peer Review 5 4 3 2 1 0 Peer Reviews were Reviews were Reviews were Reviews were Reviews No review review complete and mostly complete fairly complete missing many missed was accurate. and/or accurate. and/or accurate. trouble areas and nearly all performed. Many /or were not trouble areas Many Many recommendations accurate. Some and/or gave recommendations recommendations present. recommendations no present present present. suggestions. Final Document 5 4 3 2 1 0 Content Content is Content is Content is Content is Content is not Content is not historically historically historically mostly historically historically accurate and accurate and accurate and historically accurate and accurate. contains many contains some contains few accurate and contains few references to references to references to contains vague (vague if actual events actual events actual events references to present) to no from history. from history. from history. actual events references from history. history.
  • 21. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 1 Grammar and No Errors 2-3 errors 4-6 errors 6-9 errors 10 -12 errors 13 or more errors Punctuation Development Ideas are Ideas are Ideas are Ideas are Ideas are No and Style clearly developed, developed barely not development developed, mostly but not developed developed of ideas specific, specific and specific and Partially Does not Does not and detailed. detailed. adheres to adhere to adhere to detailed. Adheres to Adheres to diary format diary format diary format Adheres to diary format diary format diary format mostly Internal Inter. Doc. Inter. Doc. Inter. Doc. Missing No Inter. Doc. Research Works Cited Works Cited Works Cited either Inter. Or Works Cited Skills Documentation Few errors Many errors Too many Doc. Or No evidence of Works Cited errors to Works Cited research Page determine Done Free of errors incorrectly
  • 22. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 2 Adaptations for Special Needs See pages 8 and 40.
  • 23. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 3 Lesson: Jamestown Settlement in Art Content Area(s) Art Creator Ava Dowdy Grade Level High School 11/12 Grade Goals and Objective The Virginia Standards of Learning in Art: Visual Communication and Production AIV.5 The student will demonstrate confidence, sensitivity, and advanced skill in applying media, techniques, processes, and craftsmanship to achieve desired intentions in works of art. Goal and objectives related to the standard: The student will draw a portrait of a Native American or an English settler, or an African servant from the time of the Jamestown settlement. The drawing will accurately reflect the appearance of the person based on descriptions of the dress and appearance of the people of that era. All drawings will have an original background (example: use color or shading for texture, a symbol of the era, an object that represents the subject, etc.) a) Choose a person: African servant, English settler, or Native American b) Choose a medium: charcoal or watercolor Aesthetics AIV.26 The student will explain how experiences and values affect aesthetic responses to works of art. Goal and objectives related to the standard: The student will evaluate his or her own and the drawings of others for authenticity. a. Discuss how the African servants viewed the English and Native Americans b. Discuss how the English settlers viewed the Africans and Native Americans c. Discuss how the Native Americans viewed the Africans and English
  • 24. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 4 d. Discuss how people judge others who look different from themselves. Instructional Approach 1. Students will already have viewed and discussed the appearance of the African servants, English settlers, and Native Americans in previous classes. 2. The students will have read first hand descriptions that era. 3. They know that in the choral and band classes, the students will be performing music of that era, and the drawings and music will be incorporated into a PowerPoint to be shown to both the music and art classes. 4. Students will create their portraits. They will be able to refer to pictures of Africans, English settlers, and Native Americans that are posted around the art room. 5. The students will take digital pictures of their drawings and insert them into PowerPoint slides. Each student will have a slide, and the class will decide on the background design to be used for the slides. This involves both individual work and cooperative work. 6. They will have two class periods to work on the assignment. Content The content includes historical information, art techniques, technology, and a project- based outcome. Visual learning occurs through seeing portraits and drawing a portrait. Kinesthetic learning occurs through the act of drawing and creating, and students can stand or sit and move as needed to complete the drawing. The students will analyze how one’s appearance affects the way one is viewed by others and how this can affect relationships between people from different cultures.
  • 25. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 5 Adaptations for Special Needs This art lesson already incorporates various learning styles. For a student who has difficulty processing written information, a recording will be provided of the first hand accounts that time. See also pages 8, 28, and 40. Assessment 1. The art teacher will move among the students as they draw and give feedback on the accuracy of the drawings and artistic expression, along with suggestions for improvement. 2. Students will grade themselves and their peers on the quality of the drawings and the PowerPoint slides using the attached rubric. Follow-up Lesson and Assessment The portraits will be exhibited for the entire school to view. A survey will be made available to the school to vote on the drawing that most embodies the people of the Jamestown era based on historical records that the students have been studying. The survey will ask students to choose one drawing of an African, one of a Native American and one of an English settler. The results will be tabulated in a math class, separating the votes of the art students from the rest of the school. A chart will be created in Excel showing the three pictures in each category that received the most votes and how many – one for the art students and one for the rest of the school. The students in the art class will discuss the results, and answer the question: Do artists look at visual representations differently from others, why or why not?
  • 26. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 6 Lesson: Jamestown Settlement in Music Content Area(s) Music Creator Ava Dowdy Grade Level High School 11/12 Grade Goals and Objectives The Virginia Standards of Learning in Music: Performance and Production CAD.4 The student will sing in a manner reflecting the expressive qualities of music in rehearsal and performance. 1. Interpret mood, tempo, dynamics, and tone color in performance. IAD.9 The student will use dynamic contrast and technical skills as a means of expression. 1. Use multiple percussion techniques when performing on auxiliary percussion instruments. Goals and objectives related to the standards The students will perform a short piece from the era of the Jamestown settlement. a. The choral students will sight read a vocal piece by John Dowland b. The choral students will practice and refine their performance c. The choral students will record their performance into the PowerPoint. d. The percussion students will create a percussion piece using drums and rattles in the style of the Native Americans and using djembes in an African style e. The percussion students will practice and refine their pieces f. The percussion students will record their performances into the PowerPoint Aesthetics CAD.15 The student will discuss the relationship between music and the other fine arts and between music and disciplines outside the arts.
  • 27. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 7 Goals and objectives related to the standard: The students will analyze how the music and portraits work together by answering the following questions: a. Does the percussion improvisation add to or diminish the aesthetic experience of viewing the slides of the portraits of the Africans? b. Does the song add to or diminish the aesthetic experience of viewing the slides of the portraits of the English settlers? c. Does the percussion improvisation add to or diminish the aesthetic experience of viewing the slides of the portraits of the Native Americans? d. How did the English settlers view the music of the Africans and Native Americans? e. How do you react to unfamiliar music? Instructional Approach 1. Students will already have listened to and discussed the music of the Native Americans and the English settlers in previous classes. 2. They know that in the art class, the students will be drawing pictures of English settlers and Native Americans, and both the pictures and the music will be incorporated into a PowerPoint to be shown to both the music and art classes. 3. The choral class will learn a song by John Dowland. 4. The percussion section of the band will create a short piece using hand drums and rattles and another piece using djembes and tongue drums. 5. Each group will record their performance into the PowerPoint. 6. They will have two class periods to work on the assignment.
  • 28. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 8 Content The content includes music history, auditory input of different music styles, reading music scores, technology, and a project-based outcome. The song and instruments are appropriate for the period of history that is being studied. The performances for both choral and percussion students include kinesthetic and cooperative learning. The students will analyze the impact of their medium upon another medium (music and art) and how the music is a reflection of the culture from which it originated. Adaptations for Special Needs For a percussion student with some physical limitations, adapted straps can be used to assist in grasping the rattles so that the student can concentrate on manipulating and playing the gourd rattles and not on grasping. For a student in the chorus who has a visual impairment, the score for the song will be reproduced using a larger font for easier reading. Assessment 1. The choral and band directors will provide feedback while the students are practicing their respective pieces of music. 2. Students will grade themselves and their peers on the quality of the performance and the timing of their music in the PowerPoint slides using the attached rubric.
  • 29. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 2 9 Grading Rubric for Portrait and PowerPoint Name: Drawing Outstanding Acceptable Needs Improvement -authentic representation of subject - chosen medium used to develop the character of the subject - creative, original backdrop PowerPoint Outstanding Acceptable Needs Improvement -digital picture clear with no distortions -creative use of fonts, etc. for signature -cooperative with peers in choosing PPT background design
  • 30. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 0 Grading Rubric for Choral Music and PowerPoint Name: Performance Outstanding Acceptable Needs Improvement -proper vocal techniques -phrasing and interpretation of song -demonstrated ensemble skills PowerPoint Outstanding Acceptable Needs Improvement -phrasing of song coordinated with advancement of pictures -cooperative with peers in recording the song
  • 31. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 1 Grading Rubric for Percussion and PowerPoint Name: Performance Outstanding Acceptable Needs Improvement -appropriate percussion techniques -interpretation of African drumming - interpretation of Native American music -demonstrated ensemble skills PowerPoint Outstanding Acceptable Needs Improvement - performance coordinated with advancement of pictures -cooperative with peers in recording the song
  • 32. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 2 References Captain John Smith and Pocahontas. Retrieved May 5, 2007, from http://www.jamestown.abc- clio.com/ReferenceDisplay.aspx?entryid=849010 Commonwealth of Virginia, Department of Education. (2006). Music standards of learning for Virginia public schools. Richmond, VA: Author. Retrieved May 5, 2007, from http://www.pen.k12.va.us/VDOE/Superintendent/Sols/musicartsk-12.pdf Commonwealth of Virginia, Department of Education. (2006). Visual arts standards of learning for Virginia public schools. Richmond, VA: Author. Retrieved May 5, 2007, from http://www.pen.k12.va.us/VDOE/Superintendent/Sols/visualartsK-12.pdf The Complete Works of Captain John Smith, Volume2. Retrieved May 5, 2007, from http://etext.virginia.edu/etcbin/ot2www- smith?specfile=/web/data/collections/projects/jamestown/public/texts/www/ smith.o2w&act=surround&offset=2247401&tag=Smith,+John,+1580- 1631:+The+complete+works+of+Captain+John+Smith+[vol.+2]&query=mu sic First hand accounts of Virginia, 1575-1705. Retrieved May 5, 2007, from http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/ot2www- jamestown?specfile=/web/data/subjects/jamestown/persnarr.o2w&act=surr ound&offset=28967&tag=Beverley's+History+of+Virginia&query=music First slaves sand at Jamestown. Retrieved May 19, 2007, from http://www.jamestown.abc- clio.com/ReferenceDisplay.aspx?entryid=1006280 Letter of John Pory, 1619. Retrieved May 19, 2007, from http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/ot2www- jamestown?specfile=/web/data/subjects/jamestown/persnarr.o2w&act=surr ound&offset=2339336&tag=Letter+of+John+Pory,+1619&query=Africans
  • 33. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 3 Native Americans Dance. Retrieved May 5, 2007, from http://www.jamestown.abc- clio.com/ReferenceDisplay.aspx?entryid=999376 Powhatan. Retrieved May 5, 2007 from http://www.jamestown.abc- clio.com/ReferenceDisplay.aspx?entryid=849018 Settlers Make Camp at Jamestown, Virginia. Retrieved May 5, 2007, from http://www.jamestown.abc- clio.com/ReferenceDisplay.aspx?entryid=849023 Social dances of the Lenape and other north-eastern Indian tribes (n.d.) Retrieved May 17, 2007, from http://www.delawaretribeofindians.nsn.us/social_dance.html
  • 34. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 4 Lesson: Jamestown as an Economic Model; the Virginia Company of London Subject Area Virginia and World History, Economics, Art, Computer / Technology Grade 11/12 State Standards Virginia Duration of Lesson Three instructional periods Creator Steven Ortiz Goals/Objectives By the end of this lesson the student have an understanding of the role of economics in the Jamestown Settlement and its impact on success and failure as a chartered company. VS.3 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the first permanent English settlement in America by identifying the importance of the charters of the Virginia Company of London in establishing the Jamestown settlement. VS.4 The student will demonstrate knowledge of life in the Virginia colony by describing how money, barter, and credit were used. CE.9 The student will demonstrate knowledge of how economic decisions are made in the marketplace by (a) applying the concepts of scarcity, resources, choice, opportunity cost, price, incentives, supply and demand, production, and consumption; (b) comparing the differences among free market, command, and mixed economies; describing the characteristics of the United States economy, including free markets, private property, profit, and competition WHII.2 The student will demonstrate an understanding of the political, cultural, and economic conditions in the world about 1500 A.D. by analyzing major trade patterns.
  • 35. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 5 How conditions in the world in 1500 A.D led to the charter of the Virginia Company of London. AI.5 The student will demonstrate the use of technology and electronic media as artistic tools. C/T12.1 The Student will demonstrate a basic understanding of fundamental computer operations and concepts. C/T12.2 The student will use application software to accomplish a variety of learning tasks. C/T12.3 The student will develop skills in the use of telecommunications networks. C/T12.5 The student will demonstrate knowledge of technologies that support collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity. C/T12.6 The student will use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources. C/T12.9 The student will use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences. Instructional Approach Students have been studying various aspects of the history of Jamestown in honor of its 400th anniversary. In this lesson students will work in small groups to research, discuss, and present findings on trade in the 17th century, settlement of Jamestown, and the economic success of the settlement. Introduce the story of Jamestown as a business operation and a less-than-successful example of America's capitalist beginnings. Distribute copies of the lesson rubric. Discuss the activity and expectations. Have the students make recommendations for changes to the expectations in the rubric to cover concerns about working in teams.
  • 36. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 6 Procedure Learning Activities Students will review websites and research primary source documents. Student groups will draw on source documents and assume the roles of colonists and shareholders to argue the future of the Virginia Company's settlement at Jamestown. Each group will make a PowerPoint presentation that considers the follow from the perspective of their roles (either the colonists or shareholders needs). The Virginia Company as a profit-seeking endeavor o The British method of capital investment o Charters – joint stock corporations o Costs o The content of the various charters o Successes and failures after 18 years o How could the Virginia Company have succeeded? What was needed? What was provided? Questions to consider What did the charters offer? Who are the investors? What were the investors seeking? What were the instructions for the company? What is the colony like? What was “the naturals’” role? Were the colonists skilled? Who and how did the leaders affect the success of failures? After group presentations, the class will discuss a plan for the future of the Virginia Company. What would the colonists need to grow?
  • 37. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 7 What would the colonist need to survive? What did occur? Internet Resources The students will research the follow sources The Virtual Jamestown Archive: http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/vcdh/jamestown/ Read court records, labor contracts, personal letters, and newspapers. The site also contains ideas for using the primary source materials in American history classrooms. The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities: http://www.apva.org/jr.html See the reasons for the settlement's location and obstacles faced by the settlers. The American Colonist's Library: Primary Source Documents Pertaining to Early American History http://personal.pitnet.net/primarysources See the primary source documents from Jamestown. Other resources Sources for more information: www.historyisfun.org www.fsmitha.com/h3/h27-am.html www.thinkquest.org/tqjr/ http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/jamestown-browse?id=J1002T http://azimuth.harcourtcollege.com/history/ayers/chapter2/2.2.JohnSmith.html www.wm.edu/wmnews/042398/drought.html www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/PrimarySources.html
  • 38. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 8 Recommendations to Student Groups Discuss the need to collaborate and provide mind mapping or outlining charts. Discuss time constraints, and discuss how the group might divide tasks. Assessment During student activities, the teacher shall walk among the student groups and assess learning, progress, and participation. The teacher shall copy and distribute the following rubric during the lesson introduction. During the presentations, both the teacher and the student peer shall evaluate the presentations by the student groups.
  • 39. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 3 9 Score Content Conventions Organization Presentation Is well thought out No spelling, Information is Multimedia is used and supports the grammatical, or focused in an to clarify and solution to the issue punctuation organized and illustrate the main Reflects application errors thoughtful manner. points. of critical thinking High-level use of Information is Format enhances 4 Has clear goal that vocabulary and constructed in a the content. is related to the word choice logical pattern to Presentation topic support the captures audience Is pulled from a solution. attention. variety of sources Presentation is Is accurate organized and well laid out. Is well thought out Few (1 to 3) Information Multimedia is used and supports the spelling, supports the to illustrate the solution grammatical, or solution to the main points. Has application of punctuation challenge or Format is critical thinking that errors question. appropriate for the is apparent Good use of content. 3 vocabulary and Has clear goal that Presentation is related to the word choice captures audience topic attention. Is pulled from Presentation is well several sources organized. Is accurate Supports the Minimal (3 to 5) Project has a focus Multimedia loosely solution spelling, but might stray illustrates the main grammatical, or from it at times. points. Has application of punctuation critical thinking that Information Format does not errors is apparent appears to have a suit the content. Low-level use of pattern, but the 2 Has no clear goal Presentation does vocabulary and pattern is not not capture Is pulled from a word choice consistently carried audience attention. limited number of out in the project. sources Presentation is Information loosely loosely organized. Has some factual supports the errors or solution. inconsistencies Provides More than 5 Content is Presentation inconsistent spelling, unfocused and appears sloppy 1 information for grammatical, or haphazard. and/or unfinished. solution punctuation Information does Multimedia is Has no apparent errors not support the overused or application of critical Poor use of solution to the underused.
  • 40. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 4 0 Score Content Conventions Organization Presentation thinking vocabulary and challenge or Format does not Has no clear goal word choice question. enhance content. I pulled from few Information has no Presentation has sources apparent pattern. no clear Has significant organization. factual errors, misconceptions, or misinterpretations Adaptations for Diverse Learners This section modifies the lesson for students with learning or physical disabilities. Similarly, adaptations can accommodate English Language Learners (ELLs). Establish that you are not reinforcing any ethnic stereotypes when implementing the following modifications, but rather attempting to facilitate the achievement of the learning objectives. For students with learning disabilities: Allow extra time for the completion of the individual components in a task. Students can work with paraprofessionals to improve their reading and comprehension of the source material. Share the lesson material and plan tasks with the paraprofessional to allow them to plan for students’ success. Where attention issues are present, students can work separate from groups if necessary to increase the student’s ability to focus. Encourage the student’s team members to assist where applicable. For student with physical disabilities: Arrange computer tables and chairs to accommodate access to the computer. Students with wheelchairs or walkers need space to gain access to the lesson material.
  • 41. I N T E R D I C I P L I N A R Y U N I T 4 1 Place students with difficulty hearing or seeing closer to you and to the computer to ensure they can see and hear successfully. Employ the accessibility features of the computer – the narrator, magnifier, or the on-screen keyboard – appropriate to the hearing, seeing, or mobility-impaired student Use as recommended ancillary devices, such as headphones, appropriate to the impairment of the student. Encourage the student’s team members to assist where applicable. See also pages 8, 25, and 28.