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Heating gases practical
Heating gases practical
Heating gases practical
Heating gases practical
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Heating gases practical

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  • 1. Identifying the Cations and Anions in an Ionic salt Cations (p 153; 27) Use aq NaOH and aq. NH3 observe the colour differences of the precipitates obtained Anions (p. 156; 29-31) Use dil HCl, aq AgNO3, aq BaCl or other types of solutions to identify the anions by observing the - colour of precipitate - gases produced
  • 2. Other ways to identify the salt Appearance & Colour of salt (p 17-19) Different ionic salt appear differently For e.g, Group 1 salts usually appear colourless While a fine green powder usually means it is copper(II) carbonate It’s solubility also indicates possible identity
  • 3. NOW… Using heat to identify …. Observe  Test the gas produced  The colour of the salt before it is heated  the colour of the residue after heating
  • 4. Identify this salt Dark green powder does not dissolve in water gives a light blue ppt in XS aq NaOH when heated, gas turns limewater chalky and colour of residue is black What is it?

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