Management and org

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Management and org

  1. 1. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-1 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Chapter 1 Management and Organizations
  2. 2. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-2 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Who Are Managers? • Manager – Someone who works with and through other people by coordinating their work activities in order to accomplish organizational goals
  3. 3. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-3 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Types of Managers • First-line Managers – Are at the lowest level of management and manage the work of nonmanagerial employees • Middle Managers – Manage the work of first-line managers • Top Managers – Are responsible for making organization-wide decisions and establishing plans and goals that affect the entire organization
  4. 4. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-4 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Managerial Levels Top Managers Middle Managers First-Line Managers Nonmanagerial Employees
  5. 5. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-5 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada What Is Management? • Managerial Concerns – Efficiency • “Doing things right” – Getting the most output for the least input – Effectiveness • “Doing the right things” – Attaining organizational goals
  6. 6. What Do Managers Do? • Functional Approach – Planning • Defining goals, establishing strategies to achieve goals, developing plans to integrate and coordinate activities – Organizing • Arranging work to accomplish organizational goals – Leading • Working with and through people to accomplish goals – Controlling • Monitoring, comparing, and correcting the work
  7. 7. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-7 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada What Do Managers Do? (cont’d • Mintzberg’s Management Roles Approach – Interpersonal roles • Leader, association – Informational roles • Monitor, spokesperson – Decisional roles • Entrepreneur, disturbance handler, resource allocator, negotiator
  8. 8. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-8 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada What Do Managers Do? (cont’d) • Skills Approach – Technical skills • Knowledge and proficiency in a specific field – Human skills • The ability to work well with other people – Conceptual skills • The ability to think and conceptualize about conceptual and complex situations concerning the organization
  9. 9. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-9 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Skills Needed at Different Management Levels Top Managers Middle Managers Lower-level Managers Importance Conceptual Skills Human Skills Technical Skills
  10. 10. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-10 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada What Is An Organization? • An Organization Defined – A deliberate arrangement of people to accomplish some specific purpose • Common Characteristics of Organizations – Have a distinct purpose (goal) – Are composed of people – Have a deliberate structure
  11. 11. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-11 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Characteristics of Organizations Deliberate Structure Distinct Purpose People
  12. 12. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-12 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada The Changing Organization Traditional • Stable • Inflexible • Job-focused • Work is defined by job positions • Individual-oriented • Permanent jobs • Command-oriented • Managers always make decisions • Rule-oriented • Relatively homogeneous workforce • Workdays defined as 9 to 5 • Hierarchical relationships • Work at organizational facility during specific hours New Organization • Dynamic • Flexible • Skills-focused • Work is defined in terms of tasks to be done • Team-oriented • Temporary jobs • Involvement-oriented • Employees participate in decision making • Customer-oriented • Diverse workforce • Workdays have no time boundaries • Networked relationships • Work anywhere, anytime
  13. 13. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-13 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Sizes and Types of Organizations • Managers and employees work in a variety of sizes of organizations • Managers and employees work in a variety of organizations, and the type of organization has an impact on what managers can do – Publicly held organizations – Privately held organizations – Public sector organizations – Subsidiaries of foreign organizations (e.g., Sears, Safeway, General Motors, and Ford Motor Company)
  14. 14. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-14 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Challenges Managers Face • Ethics – Increased emphasis on ethics education in university and college curriculums – Increased creation and use of codes of ethics by businesses • Corporate Social Responsibility – Pursuing long-term goals that are good for society
  15. 15. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-15 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Corporate Social Responsibility • The Classical View – Maximize profits for the benefit of the stockholders – Doing “social good” unjustifiably increases costs
  16. 16. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-16 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada What Is Social Responsibility? (cont’d) • The Socio-economic View – Management should also protect and improve society’s welfare – Corporations are responsible not only to stockholders – Firms have a moral responsibility to larger society “to do the right thing”
  17. 17. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-17 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Workforce Diversity • Workforce diversity – Refers to employees in organizations who are diverse in terms of gender, race, ethnicity, or other characteristics • A global issue • A socially responsible organization recognizes and celebrates differences • Managers must make organizations more accommodating
  18. 18. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-18 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Why Study Management? • The Value of Studying Management – The universality of management • Good management is needed in all organizations – The reality of work • Employees either manage or are managed – Self-employment • Management is also important in running your own business
  19. 19. Chapter 1, Stephen P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, and Nancy Langton, Fundamentals of Management, Fifth Canadian Edition 1-19 Copyright © 2008 Pearson Education Canada Universal Need for Management All Sizes of Organizations Small Large All Types of Organizations Profit Not-for-Profit All Organization Levels Bottom Top Management Is Needed in... All Organizational Areas Manufacturing —Marketing Human Resources —Accounting Information Systems —etc.

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