3 pm3 t_1%20-%20activity%20sequencing

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3 pm3 t_1%20-%20activity%20sequencing

  1. 1. Activity Definition<br />Activity List<br />Resource Plan<br />Activity sequencing<br />Activity Resource<br />Estimating<br />Activity Duration <br />Estimating<br />Duration Estimate<br />Network Diagram<br />Schedule<br />Development<br />Integrated Schedule<br />
  2. 2. Activity Sequencing<br />Activities are “sequenced” by creating a network that defines the relationships between the various activities<br />Method:<br />Define relationships<br />Select network format<br />Map activity list into network <br />
  3. 3. Sequencing Relationships<br />Relationships between tasks are defined by either:<br />Resource constraints = sharing common resources – dealt with in “resource estimating” section later<br />Logical constraints = logical connection between the activities, eg. Can’t review the report until it is written, can’t approve it until it is reviewed, etc.<br />
  4. 4. Example Logical Relationships<br />We need complete the work, inspect and ship it. (Finish-to-start)<br />The shipping paperwork does not depend on the work being done, but we don’t want to delay shipment for it, so we want it done once the inspection is complete. (Finish-to-Finish)<br />We want to warn our customs broker once we have drawn the shipper number, which is the first thing in preparing the paperwork (Start-to-Start)<br />
  5. 5. Determining Dependencies<br />Within work packages:<br />Work package “associated” with one organizational function<br />the functional lead or team member will usually understand and specify relationships<br />Between work packages:<br />These connections often lost<br />This is where WBS Dictionary “discipline” is valuable – forces team members to think about the inputs to, and outputs from their Work Packages<br />
  6. 6. Creating Links<br />Use the “Link” tool<br />Usually creates “default” dependency (Finish-to-Start FS)<br />Enter into Activity List<br />Insert “Pedecessor” Column<br />Type in predecessor and type of dependency<br />Use “Task Info” box<br /><ul><li>Never create links between “Parent” or “Work Package” lines
  7. 7. Choose an activity – usually the first one</li></li></ul><li>Linking between Parents/Work Packages<br />Realistic schedules are 100’s to 1000’s of activities long<br />Rolling up before linking allows us to see the “big picture”, and establish connections between activities that are not near each other<br />Remember that dependencies only occur between activities<br />Eg. Here we are linking the “Optical Test Meter” and “Optical Test” parent activities<br />Note the connection is between activities 53 and 30, not 36 and 11<br />
  8. 8. Networking Techniques<br />Shipping Paperwork<br />Complete Work<br />Inspect Work<br />Ship<br />Call Customs<br />GANTT Chart with precedence arrows<br />Commonly used<br />Not a network diagram<br />Clear presentation of SS and FF relationships<br />Difficult to see relationships to tasks other than those nearby<br />Precedence Diagram Method (PDM) (Activity-on-Node, AON)<br />Convenient presentation of FS relationships for large networks<br />Easy to summarize activity details in “nodes”<br />FF/SS relationships difficult<br />Arrow Diagram Method (ADM) (Activity-on-Arrow, AOA)<br />Rarely used<br />Only FS relationships<br />May require “dummy tasks” to fully define<br />
  9. 9. Viewing the network<br />Most scheduling applications will have a “PERT” or “Network” view <br />Switch to this:<br />Move the “nodes” into an “aesthetically” pleasing network<br />“reality check” the completeness of you dependencies<br />

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