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Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction
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Assessing for Improvement: learning outcomes assessment for library instruction

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Presentation on learning outcomes assessment for library instruction; Duke University Libraries, November 2009.

Presentation on learning outcomes assessment for library instruction; Duke University Libraries, November 2009.

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  • 1. Assessing for Improvement Diane Harvey I&O Brown Bag November 11, 2009
  • 2. Learning outcomes for today
    • At the end of this session, participants will
    • be able to:
    • 1. Describe the learning outcomes assessment process in libraries.
    • 2. Write learning outcomes for an information literacy instruction session.
    • 3. Choose appropriate assessment methods.
    • 4. Define ways to work with assessment results.
  • 3. Assessment climate in higher education
    • Spellings Commission http:// www.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/index.html
    • Voluntary System of Accountability (VSA) http:// www.voluntarysystem.org /
  • 4. Accrediting Agencies
    • http://www.sacs.org/
    • The institution identifies expected outcomes, assesses the extent to
    • which it achieves these outcomes, and provides evidence of improvement based on analysis of the results in each of the following areas:
    • 3.3.1.1 educational programs, to include student learning outcomes
  • 5. Assessment at Duke
    • SACS re-accreditation
    • Trinity Office of Assessment
    • Libraries Strategic Plan
    • “ Implement a student learning outcomes assessment program for the Libraries’instructional activities.” (4.2)
  • 6. Assessing for improvement We don’t assess to prove… … but to improve.
  • 7. Assessment in libraries
    • Focus on collections and services (e.g. ARL LibQUAL)
    • Focus on standards (e.g. ACRL Info Lit Competency Standards)
  • 8. What is LOA: learning outcomes assessment?
    • Systematic look at what students are learning
    • Moving from “What am I going to teach today?” to “What do I want students to learn today?”
  • 9. What LOA is NOT
    • NOT evaluation of teaching
    • NOT evaluation of program
  • 10. Why assess student learning in libraries?
    • Affirm commitment to student learning
    • Improve effectiveness of instructional programs
    • Align with campus, disciplinary, and higher ed efforts
    • Be recognized on campus for contributions to student learning
  • 11. Assessment loop 2.Set criteria 3.Devise assessment measures 1.Develop student learning outcomes 4.Do assessment 5. Work with results
  • 12. Levels of assessment
    • Institutional (University wide)
    • Program (e.g. Department)
    • Course
    • Session (e.g. IL instruction)
  • 13. LOA in libraries: constraints
    • Lack of consistent, reliable access to students
    • IL instruction: is it a “program”?
    • Program assessment vs. session assessment
    • Difficult to isolate effects of library instruction
  • 14. Mapping an IL program First Year Writing and Freshman Seminars Subject specific instruction Honors capstone seminars Research methods/R &W
  • 15. Where can student learning be assessed?
    • On the instruction session level?
    • Across a series of library instruction sessions?
    • Broadly across the student population?
  • 16. It’s important to remember that…
    • …library instruction doesn’t work the same way as instruction in an academic department.
    • …we need to be able to explain how and why we assess student learning.
  • 17. Some simple approaches
    • Develop learning outcomes across instruction program, and look at where they are taught – “snapshots”
    • Focus on large programmatic efforts e.g. first year writing
    • Highlight specific academic departments
    • Assess individual library instruction sessions – develop shared learning outcomes, compare/contrast
  • 18. What is a learning outcome?
    • A learning outcome is one sentence that indicates what students should represent, demonstrate or produce as a result of what they learn.
    • - source: Peggy Maki
  • 19. Good learning outcomes:
    • Focus on what students will learn/know/be able to do
    • Describe actions or behaviors
    • Are results oriented
    • Are observable and measurable
    • Include a time frame
  • 20. ACRL Standards
    • 3 levels: standards, performance indicators, outcomes
    • Can be used for LOA
    • Examples of ACRL outcomes: (1)Identifies keywords, synonyms and related terms for the information needed [Standard Two] (2) Selects an appropriate documentation style and uses it consistently to cite sources [Standard Five]
  • 21. Writing outcomes
    • Today, we’ll write learning outcomes for a library instruction session.
  • 22. Exercise: What do you cover?
    • Think of an information literacy instruction session that you have taught or are going to teach.
    • List what you would cover in that session.
  • 23. Bloom’s Taxonomy
    • Classification of educational objectives
    • Published in 1956, revised in 2001 (changes: noun to verb, synthesis/creating becomes highest level)
    • Taxonomy = classification
    • Cognitive levels (lower  higher)
    • Provides way to express outcomes
  • 24. Bloom’s levels (lowest  highest)
    • Knowledge/Remembering
    • Comprehension/Understanding
    • Application/Applying
    • Analysis/Analyzing
    • Evaluation/Evaluating
    • Synthesis/Creating
  • 25. Verbs for information literacy
    • Knowledge/Remembering : define, list, recognize
    • Comprehension/Understanding : characterize, describe, explain, identify, locate, recognize, sort
    • Application/Applying : choose, demonstrate, implement, perform
    • Analysis/Analyzing : analyze, categorize, compare, differentiate
    • Evaluation/Evaluating : assess, critique, evaluate, rank, rate
    • Synthesis/Creating : construct, design, formulate, organize, synthesize
  • 26. Verbs to avoid
    • Understand
    • Appreciate
    • Know about
    • Become familiar with
    • Learn about
    • Become aware of
  • 27. Learning outcomes formula
    • 1. Time frame
    • 2. Student focus
    • 3. Action verb
    • 4. Product/process/outcome
  • 28. Using the formula
    • Time frame: “After attending this instruction session…”
    • Student focus: “…students will be able to…”
    • Action verb: “…identify…”
    • Product/process: “…a relevant database for their term paper research.”
  • 29. Another example:
    • Time frame: “After completing the online tutorial…”
    • Student focus: “…students will be able to…”
    • Action verb: “…differentiate between…”
    • Product/process: “…scholarly journals and popular magazines.”
  • 30. One more example:
    • Time frame: “By the time they complete their undergraduate program…”
    • Student focus: “…students will be able to…”
    • Action verb: “…construct…”
    • Product/process: “…a research question that can be investigated using primary archival resources.”
  • 31. Examples: bad and better
    • Bad: Students will understand how to use social science databases.
    • Better: Students will perform a search in Social Sciences Abstracts that retrieves relevant items.
    • Bad: Students will be able to search the catalog.
    • Better: Students will construct a catalog search to identify a relevant book on their topic.
    • Bad: Students will appreciate the importance of correct citation.
    • Better: Students will produce citations in correct APA format.
  • 32. Now, write your own!
    • Choose two items from the list of what you cover in an information literacy session.
    • Transform them into learning outcomes, using the formula.
    • Find a partner and critique your outcomes using the following checklist.
  • 33. Checklist for learning outcomes
    • Includes a time frame?
    • Focuses on students?
    • Uses action verbs?
    • Names a product or process?
    • Is measurable/observable?
    • Prompts a measure/method?
    • Will be useful for you to assess?
  • 34. Sample size
    • Use any convenient sample that will give you useable information.
    • Make sure that groups of interest are represented.
    • Sample size is important only if you plan to publish your results.
    • Do you want to generalize to the entire student population?
  • 35. Direct and Indirect Measures
    • Direct: Students demonstrate an expected learning outcome
    • Indirect: Students report their perception of how well a given learning outcome has been achieved
    • Direct is always preferable.
  • 36. Easy assessment methods
    • Knowledge test
    • One Minute paper & variations
    • Bibliography analysis
    • Concept Inventory
    • Standardized test
  • 37. Knowledge tests
    • Tests knowledge/skills before and/or after library instruction session.
    • Can be given at end of library session or later in semester.
    • Can use clickers to gather data during library session.
    • Sample questions :
    • 1. What is the difference between a library catalog and a database?
    • 2. The Boolean operator “or” narrows a search
    • statement (true/false).
  • 38. One minute paper & variations
    • Sample questions:
    • 1. What is the most important thing about library research you learned today?
    • 2. 3-2-1 (three things you learned, two things you’re still confused about, one thing you’d change about session)
    • 3. What is one question you still have?
    • 4. In your research, what will you do differently after today’s session?
  • 39. Using Blackboard
    • Tests: are graded, can look at individual results
    • Surveys: not graded, results are aggregated
    • Assignments: allow students to upload documents
  • 40. Using Viewsflash
    • Create a survey/questionnaire
    • Students can login with net id or the survey can be open
    • Results can be emailed to you, and/or collected and exported to Excel
  • 41. Bibliography analysis
    • Look for citations from scholarly/peer reviewed journals
    • Look for citations for books and journals owned by Duke libraries
    • Look for articles retrieved from Duke databases
  • 42. Concept inventory
    • Make a checklist of 3-12 important concepts students need to master.
    • Ask students to explain each concept in a sentence or two. If a concept is unfamiliar, they should leave blank.
    • Count good responses for each concept, then plan future instruction.
  • 43. Standardized tests
    • I-Skills
    • ILT (James Madison University)
    • SAILS
  • 44. Using assessment information
    • Rewrite learning outcomes
    • Change what you do/how you teach
    • Work collaboratively with colleagues (librarians and faculty)
    • Revise assessment measures
    • Share the news in the library and on campus
  • 45. Learning outcomes are:
    • Fundamental components of a learning assessment program
    • Focused on student learning
    • Indicate what students will know/be able to do
    • Measurable, observable, overt
  • 46. Learning Outcomes Assessment
    • A tool to help librarians
    • improve student learning
  • 47. LOA resources
    • Angelo, Thomas (1993). Classroom assessment techniques.
    • Maki, Peggy (2004). Assessing for learning : building a sustainable commitment across the institution.
    • Neely, Teresa Y(2006). Information literacy assessment : standards-based tools and assignments.
    • Radcliff, Carolyn et.al (2007). A practical guide to information literacy assessment for academic librarians.
    • Student Learning Outcomes Assessment (University of Virginia) http://www.web.virginia.edu/iaas/assessment/outcomes.htm

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