Keynote Speech, Vijay Kumar: Learning OUTed -- Open Ubiquitous Transformational

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Keynote Speaker: Vijay Kumar

Dr. Vijay Kumar is Senior Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education and Director of the Office of Educational Innovation and Technology, DUE at MIT. In this capacity he provides leadership for sustainable technology-enabled educational innovation at MIT. In his prior roles at MIT as Assistant Provost and Director of Academic Computing, as well at other institutions, Vijay provided leadership for units engaged in delivering infrastructure and services for the effective integration of information technology and media services in education. Vijay was the Principal Investigator of O.K.I (Open Knowledge Initiative), a MIT-led collaborative project to develop an open architecture for enterprise educational applications.

Vijay is a member of the Advisory Committee of MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) and a member of the steering committee for I-Campus, the MIT-Microsoft Alliance initiative for educational technology. He is the Executive officer for MIT's Council on Educational Technology. Vijay also served on the Applications Strategy Council for Internet2, as a Trustee of the Corporation for Research and Education Networking (CREN), Chair of the Boards of the Seminars on Academic Computing (SAC) Snowmass, CO and NERCOMP.

Vijay is an active champion of open education efforts: As an honorary Advisor to India's National Knowledge Commission he has been engaged in advancing Open and technology enabled initiatives for educational access and quality in India; He is actively involved in efforts, such as those supported by the Hewlett Foundation, and Curriki to advance the use of Open Educational Resources for improving educational access and quality. He is also an advisor to the Open University of Catalonia.

Vijay has recently co-edited "Opening Up Education: The Collective Advancement of Education through Open Technology, Open Content and Open Knowledge " (MIT Press, August 2008), a book sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

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  • This slide builds to show the IP contributions of the partners and then the two years of the project towards the releases.
  • Many players higher education institutions many different types of content, one size does not fit all Across continents
  • European schoolnet – 19 countries Col – virutal university of the small states Wgbh – teachers domain Teacher ed in sub saharan africa – portal literacy, numeracy, life skills
  • Part of thDiscourse on Educational Change – Macro- MicroIn fact the ascendance of the movement and the risk of missing the moment is what motivated Toru andJSb and a wholw bunch of people many of who became c – to launch the OUE book project . Not going to go through a section.chapter accont -- sy a few words – use it as a gfraework for some of m comments
  • Co-editor –anthology is a product of contributions from an illustrious set of authors who have reflected their experience and obs – Authors from England, Canada, te IS I would like to start with some comments on the motivation for this effort and the process that led us to here. Motivation – So what did we – That there is a movement underway is no secret – gathering storm of open ed – multiple initiatives –Our belief that there is transformative potential –could be under-realized - and that even as we see the success and impact of these initiatives as a community we should think about the implication of these initiative so that they not live or die as disparate experiments, More importantly we have to examine as ed practioners, planners – how this movememnt can help develp a constructive, preferred educatinal future that can help address some persistent problems but also new opps.
  • Summary Comments “ Open technology” means that solutions work over time and that they can transfers as easily across departments institutions. “Open content” means we can adopt and adapt each others’ teaching innovations as easily as we can build on research findings. “Open knowledge” means we have the means to capture and disseminate our pedagogic ideas as easily as we can write and publish papers. Proces – Organizing Framework : sections – not mut exclo – interreated simlpifying/org fram As yo can see – illustrious authotrs iL AB – Open Source avantages; OKI – Design Considerations that limit access – Des - geberative Each section covers a range of topics – reflecting on the value proposition – Genesis of the projects – the ed drivers; some of the particu;ar Pointng to issues and chalemnges
  • becomes a basis for planning as we look at how best to leverage Open Ed. A quick shorthand description of the process – Snapshot – Therm is derived from the CF Keep Toolkit - a too to describe the value proposition of an educational innovation or project succintly but substantively - describe what it took and what it would do extend its impact and sustain We SUMMIT –– brog toghe te authors – set the framework and engagement process we discussed these questins, the napshots And also treated it as a Futurin process and set the framework for authors contributions:
  • Investigate the Transformative Potential and Ecological Transitions Shed new light on the persistent, hard problems of education with respect to access and quality, and perhaps offer new solutions. Provide a fresh new look at the practice of education, necessitated by that flatness and fortunes expected of the new global dynamics of mobility and emerging economies? Offer new pathways to improve education as a whole? ACCESS _ The India Case – Universal Primary Education Vs Secondary Ed Capacity – cannot ne met by traditional approaches - - Customizing learning experiences Meeting the diverse preparation of students -fast feedback lops learning gains The nature of the challenge is clear when you create a triangle of vectors. With traditional methods of face-to-face teaching this is an iron triangle. You want to stretch the triangle like this to give greater access, higher quality and lower costs. But you can’t!   Try extending access by packing more students into each classroom and you will be accused of damaging quality.   Try improving quality with better learning resources and the cost will go up.   Try cutting costs and you will endanger both access and quality. This iron triangle has hindered the expansion of education throughout history. It has created in the public mind – and probably in your own thinking – an insidious link between quality and exclusivity . This link still drives the admission policies of many universities, which define their quality by the people they exclude. promote the move from elite education to open learning (Gerry Stahl) support both formal and informal education we need to learn more design mode than belief mode (Marlene Scardamalia) improve both individual and collective learning ACCESS _ The India Case – Universal Primary Education Vs Secondary Ed Capacity – cannot ne met by traditional approaches - - Customizing learning experiences Meeting the diverse preparation of students -fast feedback lops learning gains Relvance – iLAb –Hands on ; Economics of lab experiences Redefinig Distance Education from a traditinal second class citizen promote the move from elite education to open learning (Gerry Stahl) support both formal and informal education we need to learn more design mode than belief mode (Marlene Scardamalia) improve both individual and collective learning
  • ‹ #› 12 CM portfolio of online courses Statistics course – random experiment last spring Students took online stats course available 24/7 outperform students who took the traditional lecture course and accelerated their learning – completed the course in 8 weeks vis-à-vis the traditional 15 week course. What does this tell us about how and when students learn best? Need to be repeated to be generalizable to students beyond Carnegie Mellon
  • Network-based delivery needs to become a central modality for delivering quality education.This was the foundational premise fotr the set of recommendations thatI was involve dindev -for OER in NKC and they are valid for secondary ed Key components of NeO-Ed. process Distributed Repositories, Domain-specific Grids and Portals, Interaction facilities, Robust connectivity
  • (National Knowledge Commission Recommendations) Increasing capabilities of Open Educational Resources, Networks and digital technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to Serve the knowledge needs of diverse communities Amplify interaction among students and teachers Introduce innovative and interactive educational experiences Capacity Building for Education Develop ecology for sustainable transformation of education in India.
  • The growing abundance of ed resources is an important step -- but I beleve that the real promise is Blended - for example - Contact Sport - extensive access coupled with contact opps - scaling excellence needs this; Whether faculty dev or non formal ed; Combine Real and Virtual -- augmented reality ==students with mobile devices superimposing virtual on real landscape - biology - tree describing its botanical chractrtstics== Beyond Typical Boundaries: geography and political -- disciplonary boundaries - Karen Wilcox ( Flash-bak-forward); Remix -BiResearch/Teaching; Research Commubnity (Summarizing) Wkis Blogs - - are already ointing to rhepossiblities/potential of social neworks - collaborative construction of knowledge - implications for knowledge economy= virtua;l collb workspaces = shared meanmg - Not only a contact sport but a widely distributed team sport. Diana Oblinger; Neeru; acaWIKI; New notion of boundarliessness - OCW ( Geo; Inst --) iLab ( Value of situated - inst boundaries Flashback - Learner - Teacher ( Social Net There is a relationship between physical structures and how people learn unless the learning spaces are very flexible “ Content” will be almost immediately available electronically - this changes the role of faculty All modern education will involve some intelligent mix of physical space and cyberspace There will be different mixes dependent on the desired learning outcomes and the maturity of the learners UG education is well-suited to physical proximity while executive education may be better suited to cyber-proximity Blended education Intelligent combinations of the physical and virtual Intelligent combinations of formal and non-formal Seamless integration of learning for UGs to Alums UGs in residence, Alums periodically sample & contribute via cyberspace with customizable learning modules
  • Students will perform a broad range of educationally meaningful experiments online in real time. Online laboratories will be embedded inside rich educational platforms that include visualization tools, simulations, data processing, collaboration, etc. Online laboratories and their educational content will be broadly shared across many institutions all over the world.
  • Introduction Visualizing Cultures is a gateway to seeing history through images that once had wide circulation among peoples of different times and places. We do historical research this way as scholars to better understand how people saw themselves, how they saw others including foreigners and enemies, and how in turn others saw them. Visualizing Cultures has been designed to offer viewers—especially scholars, teachers, and students—ready access to hitherto inaccessible materials, as well as guides to their careful analysis and use. To this end, each topical unit is (or eventually will be) accompanied by a substantial Database, Bibliography, and lengthy Lesson Plan. Videos, including interviews, complement some of the presentations and analysis. All images can be enlarged and scrutinized in detail, and also downloaded for use in educational projects. To date (2006), Visualizing Cultures uses Japan since the mid-19th century as a case study for gaining new perspectives on “cultures” in the broadest sense—the “cultures,” for example, of Westernization, modernization, changing modes of technology and mass communication, imperialism, nationalism, militarism, racism, commercialization and consumerism, etc. Projected future units will deal with photography in late 19th and early 20th-century Asia; modernism in Japan before World War Two; and the Asia-Pacific War of the 1930s and early 1940s (including in China) as seen from the perspectives—and through the propaganda—of all the various antagonists. The units on "Visualizing Japan" have been written by John W. Dower. Technology and pedagogy development for these units is under the supervision of Shigeru Miyagawa. Hive Explorer – Integrating with MIT Visualizing Cultures In addition to exposing the Hive repository, HarvestRoad has commenced work to add federated searching to its new tool, Hive Explorer . Hive Explorer is a Java-based application that provides enhanced functionality for browsing, searching and publishing content to Hive. It is also available as a plugin for RELOAD Editor , enabling drag and drop assembly of courses using resources and metadata stored in Hive. Content packages can be assembled using resources in Hive or other repositories. Release 2.0 will include support for the OKI Repository OSID to enable it to search and retrieve resources from many other repositories. The graphic above shows the Hive Explorer prototype that has searched and retrieved data from a repository called Visualizing Cultures.
  • Hive Explorer – Integrating with MIT Visualizing Cultures In addition to exposing the Hive repository, HarvestRoad has commenced work to add federated searching to its new tool, Hive Explorer . Hive Explorer is a Java-based application that provides enhanced functionality for browsing, searching and publishing content to Hive. It is also available as a plugin for RELOAD Editor , enabling drag and drop assembly of courses using resources and metadata stored in Hive. Content packages can be assembled using resources in Hive or other repositories. Release 2.0 will include support for the OKI Repository OSID to enable it to search and retrieve resources from many other repositories. The graphic above shows the Hive Explorer prototype that has searched and retrieved data from a repository called Visualizing Cultures.
  • Spoken Lecture Browser in support of introductory Physics The goal of this project is to enable educators and students to more effectively disseminate audio and video recordings of academic lecture material. To do this, we are developing technologies such as automatic speech recognition and language processing to help transcribe, annotate, structure , and even summarize audio-visual materials to help people search and explore these kind of data more easily. Our particular focus has been on recorded lectures that are being made available via initiatives such as MIT OpenCourseWare and MITWorld, in order to improve their accessibility to students or anyone interesting in learning from these educational materials. Allowing current instructor to leverage core content as presented by one of MIT’s most energetic and effective lecturers System allows students to search from among hours and hours of lecture to find the exact places in the video where key concepts are discussed or demonstrated This is based on direct transcription of the original video OEIT adding functionality to allow current instructor and TAs to massage metadata to further assure that first year students quickly and easily find pertinent content when they need it
  • First and second bullet address the issue of access – level the playing field Third and fourth address potential transformative impact on teaching and learning Third, personalization – addressing unique norms and cultures, creates efficiencies – don’t always need to start from scratch Fourth, allows for the wisdom on the masses, and rapid prototype development. Unique added value -- these two characteristics are fundamental to Open Education Resources. They need learning design support tools to engage
  • Exciting, yes, but also bewildering. The abundance of information and interaction can overwhelm What do we/our institutions need to consider to benefit from new opportunities or mitigate new risks. What must we fo to facilitate needed changes. The increasing availablity of openly available resources is a good thng. But it can be bewidering and overwhelmimg. The Rhyme of te Ancient Mariner – Water Water Everwhere – Nor any Drop to drink e.g. Content –Can we find what we need/want? Can we get it? Can we Use it productively for learning Is it in aform that can be assimilated, adapted A conyent Inventory – Self – learning value – But all content is not appropriate this In terms of Educational resources – use by otherfaculty n other cotexts requires some understandinf of the ped motivation , underpinigs -- Design for Agency: design’s inf;uential role in the degree of user interaction – consider broader socio/political context within which tec will be used/adopted e,g central control in cms Gates are locked to resources outside of a course; livcensing prohibits
  • Tools to enanb;e better finding Source – is necessary for quality but not sufficient
  • Enable the movement and manipulation of educational materials - Simply, Meaningfully Portability; Interoperability; Reusability An ecology characterized by Open, Community or proprietary Source Commodities that provide : Value (heterogeneous); Choice (of Technology,Tools,Delivery ); Sustainability
  • Enable the movement and manipulation of educational materials - Simply, Meaningfully Portability; Interoperability; Reusability An ecology characterized by Open, Community or proprietary Source Commodities that provide : Value (heterogeneous); Choice (of Technology,Tools,Delivery ); Sustainability
  • The New opportunities can overwhelm and be underexploited by an educational system whose practices, are cast in a framework of scarce resources. Higher Education, with a culture that has comfortably settled on one dominant model of formal academic learning wedded to paper and print as well as, physical tools such as lab instruments, is highly situated (i.e. you learn where the tools are), reflecting this model of scarcity. Students pay tuition to have access to the scarce resources of faculty and learning tools located in one place. This scarcity is monetized through a seat-time measure. The manifesting nature of learning via the Internet, open education, instead works within an emerging economic model of abundance. Philip Slater, an anthropologist, author of In Pursuit of Loneliness , saw the post-war abundance in America as a root cause for the “revolution” of the 1960s when baby-boomers, enjoying the wealth of their parents, could not understand the As students comment on each other’s work in process, guided and influenced by teacher comments, they and the teacher are bringing to life a vital new kind of social learning: conversation (part oral and part in sharing of work done on computers) with each other which in itself is the work of the course. The conversation can and does continue between classes. Exciting, yes, but also bewildering. The abundance of information and interaction This new kind of interaction engages the “network self” in students, and in faculty, which has a new set of skills. The network self is comfortable with digital abundance and finds ways to use it. Chatting on your smart phone in class doesn’t necessarily mean you, as a young student, are ready to be immersed in energy-demanding, non-directed collaborative work. Facility with technology and focused intellectual work are still very different cognitively. And, perhaps the students’ high schools have been held to national standards that run counter to the new culture of abundance. Students may “have the hippie in them,” but they don’t really expect it to be in their teachers. Have we created a mental mold called “the classroom” that has us in thrall? Collectivity Culture Design Organizational Legal: Open & Community Source Licenses (CC) Consortia: Sakai; OCW; iLabs… Is Real transformation underway Can w trace some of the principal vectors of change How might our institutions be affected? The University and the Rise of Social Production Networks make the spatial remove less significant – as a cause of and less usable as a mechanism for maintaining system coherence What do our institutions need to consider to benefit from new opportunities or mitigate new risks. What must we fo to facilitate needed changes. Exciting, yes, but also bewildering. The abundance of information and interaction opportunities can overwhelm and be underexploited by an educational system whose practices, are cast in a framework of scarce resources. Higher Education, with a culture that has comfortably settled on one dominant model of formal academic learning wedded to paper and print as well as, physical tools such as lab instruments, is highly situated (i.e. you learn where the tools are), reflecting this model of scarcity. Students pay tuition to have access to the scarce resources of faculty and learning tools located in one place. This scarcity is monetized through a seat-time measure. The manifesting nature of learning via the Internet, open education, instead works within an emerging economic model of abundance. Philip Slater, an anthropologist, author of In Pursuit of Loneliness , saw the post-war abundance in America as a root cause for the “revolution” of the 1960s when baby-boomers, enjoying the wealth of their parents, could not understand the As students comment on each other’s work in process, guided and influenced by teacher comments, they and the teacher are bringing to life a vital new kind of social learning: conversation (part oral and part in sharing of work done on computers) with each other which in itself is the work of the course. The conversation can and does continue between classes. This new kind of interaction engages the “network self” in students, and in faculty, which has a new set of skills. The network self is comfortable with digital abundance and finds ways to use it. Chatting on your smart phone in class doesn’t necessarily mean you, as a young student, are ready to be immersed in energy-demanding, non-directed collaborative work. Facility with technology and focused intellectual work are still very different cognitively. And, perhaps the students’ high schools have been held to national standards that run counter to the new culture of abundance. Students may “have the hippie in them,” but they don’t really expect it to be in their teachers. Have we created a mental mold called “the classroom” that has us in thrall?
  • How might our institutions be affected? The University and the Rise of Social Production Networks make the spatial remove less significant – as a cause of and less usable as a mecchnism for maintaining system coherence What do our institutions need to consider to benefit from new opportunities or mitigate new risks. Ability of learning technologies to be integrated together into an educational infrastructure. Easier sharing of applications and content among institutions that can be a catalyst for cooperative and commercial development. Lower long term cost of software ownership, as well as increased stability and reliability for example through replacement/upgrading of single components, rather than entire systems,. Making tacit and local knowledge of effective teaching and learning visible and useful to others (both globally and locally) . The commons must serve both as a repository and a seedbed. Open knowledge is not simply about making new pedagogical work available. It is about creating the conditions in which ever better ideas and models can come forward. What must we fo to facilitate neded changes. Networks make the patial remove less significant – as a cause of and less usable as a mecchnism for maintaining system coherence Exciting, yes, but also bewildering. The abundance of information and interaction opportunities can overwhelm and be underexploited by an educational system whose practices, are cast in a framework of scarce resources. Higher Education, with a culture that has comfortably settled on one dominant model of formal academic learning wedded to paper and print as well as, physical tools such as lab instruments, is highly situated (i.e. you learn where the tools are), reflecting this model of scarcity. Students pay tuition to have access to the scarce resources of faculty and learning tools located in one place. This scarcity is monetized through a seat-time measure. The manifesting nature of learning via the Internet, open education, instead works within an emerging economic model of abundance. Philip Slater, an anthropologist, author of In Pursuit of Loneliness , saw the post-war abundance in America as a root cause for the “revolution” of the 1960s when baby-boomers, enjoying the wealth of their parents, could not understand the As students comment on each other’s work in process, guided and influenced by teacher comments, they and the teacher are bringing to life a vital new kind of social learning: conversation (part oral and part in sharing of work done on computers) with each other which in itself is the work of the course. The conversation can and does continue between classes. This new kind of interaction engages the “network self” in students, and in faculty, which has a new set of skills. The network self is comfortable with digital abundance and finds ways to use it. Chatting on your smart phone in class doesn’t necessarily mean you, as a young student, are ready to be immersed in energy-demanding, non-directed collaborative work. Facility with technology and focused intellectual work are still very different cognitively. And, perhaps the students’ high schools have been held to national standards that run counter to the new culture of abundance. Students may “have the hippie in them,” but they don’t really expect it to be in their teachers. Have we created a mental mold called “the classroom” that has us in thrall? econd, true success in open education requires a major shift in education culture and policy.  The academic community values activities like writing textbooks and inventing new research methods, and it generally acknowledges success through reward systems such as tenure and promotion.  But given higher education’s penchant for esteeming originality above all else, adapting or improving another’s educational materials is rarely understood to be a creative, valuable contribution. Many instructors view their practice, like their pedagogies, as a personal asset in need of protection. This territorial aspect of education culture, coupled with a faculty reward system that ignores innovation when it is grounded in the work of others, robs the education community as a whole.  If there are no incentives for faculty to mindfully use and enrich open educational goods to transform their teaching and student learning, valuable pedagogical knowledge will be lost. Finally, we must look beyond institutional boundaries and connect efforts among many settings and open source entrepreneurs. Administrators and faculty leaders should help institutions strategize how to support and sustain open education on a long-term basis. The organizational commitment to support this work promotes cooperation and knowledge sharing which is necessary to catapult open education into a highly sustainable and accessible format.assert that education can be improved and expanded by sharing the “secrets” of pedagogical inquiry and harnessing the collective wisdom of a community of practice and reflection. Furthermore, it is also vital for us to continue to explore sustainability strategies for all these efforts and “cultures of openness” across the areas of open technology, open content, and open educational practice. Moving from novice to expert is what education is about May see a tendency/desire for more customization to individual learning styles (seeing it in K-12 & computers) We know more about learning styles Technology may make individualized focus more possible At its best MIT will help every student find a niche May become more personalized and individualized This is a move to demand-pull education
  • Enable the movement and manipulation of educational materials - Simply, Meaningfully Portability; Interoperability; Reusability An ecology characterized by Open, Community or proprietary Source Commodities that provide : Value (heterogeneous); Choice (of Technology,Tools,Delivery ); Sustainability
  • Keynote Speech, Vijay Kumar: Learning OUTed -- Open Ubiquitous Transformational

    1. 1. Vijay Kumar Sakai 2009 Cambridge, MA, July 8, 2009 Learning OUTed O pen U biquitous T ransformational
    2. 2. Michigan • CHEF Framework • CourseTools • WorkTools Indiana • Navigo Assessment • Eden Workflow • OneStart • Oncourse MIT • Stellar Stanford • CourseWork • Assessment OKI • OSIDs uPortal SAKAI 2.0 Release • Tool Portability Profile • Framework • Services-based Portal SAKAI Tools • Complete CMS • Assessment • Workflow • Research Tools • Authoring Tools Primary SAKAI Activity Refining SAKAI Framework, Tuning and conforming additional tools Intensive community building/training Activity : Ongoing implementation work at local institution… Activity : Maintenance & Transition from a project to a community SAKAI 1.0 Release • Tool Portability Profile • Framework • Services-based Portal • Refined OSIDs & implementations SAKAI Tools • Complete CMS • Assessment Primary SAKAI Activity Architecting for JSR-168 Portlets, Refactoring “best of” features for tools Conforming tools to Tool Portability Profile "Best of" Sakai Core Project Open Systems Refactoring Jan 04 July 04 May 05 Dec 05
    3. 3. Accelerating Global Movement Higher Education
    4. 4. K-12
    5. 5. Journals, Books, Videos, Data, Games …
    6. 6. OER as Key Strategy for Educational Advancement <ul><li>Commonwealth of Learning </li></ul><ul><li>International Council for Distance Education (ICDE) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>EADTU </li></ul></ul><ul><li>UNESCO </li></ul><ul><ul><li>WCHE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Open Suite </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Open Textbook Initiatives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>+ India </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Part of the Discourse on Educational Change </li></ul>
    7. 7. A Collaborative Publication Project <ul><li>“ How can we advance teaching and learning by taking full advantage of open education?” </li></ul><ul><li>A hardcover book + free online distribution with Creative Commons </li></ul><ul><li>30 chapters by 38 prominent leaders and visionaries (Foreword by John Seely Brown) </li></ul><ul><li>Lessons learned and visions of the future from: OKI, IMS, CNI, Sakai, Moodle, ETUDES, iCampus, VUE, Mellon Foundation, OCW, Connexions, OLI, MERLOT, OpenLearn, SOFIA, Creative Commons, LAMS, Hewlett Foundation, CASTL, VKP, ISSOTL, Open University, Carnegie Foundation, and more </li></ul>The Carnegie Foundation’s Book on Open Education (Winter 2008, MIT Press)
    8. 8. Opening Up Education: A Framework Section Editor: Owen McGrath Trent Batson Steve Ehrmann David Kahle M. S. Vijay Kumar Stuart Lee Phil Long Clifford Lynch Christopher Mackie Neeru Paharia Edward Walker Section Editor: Flora McMartin Richard Baraniuk Tom Carey Catherine Casserly Gerard Hanley Diane Harley Andy Lane Steve Lerman Anne Margulies Shigeru Miyagawa Marshall Smith Candace Thille David Wiley Section Editor: Cheryl Richardson Randy Bass Dan Bernstein Barbara Cambridge James Dalziel Bernadine Chuck Fong Richard Gale Mary Huber Pat Hutchings Toru Iiyoshi Diana Laurillard Marilyn Lombardi Diana Oblinger Open Technology Open Content Open Knowledge
    9. 9. Opening Up Education: Key Dimensions <ul><li>What does open education mean as an agency for change both in formal and informal education? </li></ul><ul><li>The educational value proposition and implications of open education initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>The factors that would propel these initiatives towards having a larger impact on education. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Value Proposition and Readiness <ul><ul><li>Value Proposition ( Transformative Potential) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Shed new light on the Persistent, hard problems of education? - Iron Triangle of Access, Quality and Cost (Sir John Daniel) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Does it allow New Aspirations? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>New solutions </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>New look look at the practice of education </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fresh perspective on resources and relationships? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Readiness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What factors would help Open initiatives  have a larger impact on education? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How can we tightly integrate open education efforts with educational program priorities </li></ul></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Making a Difference – Educator Use Professor Richard Hall LaTrobe University in Melbourne, Australia, now teaching information systems, beginning microprocessors, and advanced computer-aided software engineering. OCW saved him “an enormous amount of time and stress.” “ I was delighted by the way the material is so coherently presented. It is truly inspiring to see this level of excellence .”
    12. 12. Making a Difference – Student Use Kunle Adejumo, Engineering student at Ahmadu Bello University in Zaria, Nigeria “ Last semester, I had a course in metallurgical engineering. I didn’t have notes, so I went to OCW. I downloaded a course outline on this, and also some review questions, and these helped me gain a deeper understanding of the material.”
    13. 13. Accelerated Learning – OLI Challenges Conventional Wisdom
    14. 14. India National Knowledge Commission Advancing Access and Quality <ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing capabilities of Open Educational Resources, Networks and Digital Technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Serve the knowledge needs of diverse communities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Amplify interaction among students and teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduce innovative and interactive educational experiences </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Capacity Building for Education </li></ul><ul><li>Develop ecology for sustainable transformation of education in India. </li></ul>
    15. 15. NKC Recommendations for OER <ul><li>Launch a national e-conten t and curriculum initiative </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Leverage global open educational resources movement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support the production of quality content by a select set of Indian institutions. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Initiate development of online programmes for science and engineering laboratories – simulation s </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Establish 50-100 laboratories (iLAB) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Undertake a large scale e-Curriculum development effort directed toward adaptation and adoption support . </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Open Education Vision Elements <ul><li>Blended Learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Intelligently combine the physical and the virtual </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrate conventional pedagogy with net-learning to deliver quality (relevant) educational opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intelligent combinations of formal and non-formal </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Boundary-less Education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Beyond Geo-political : </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Research-Teaching </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Disciplines -- Thematic and World Problem based </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Energy; STEM </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher-Learner; Expert-Novice </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Off-Campus-On Campus </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Living-Learning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Seamless Life Long Learning </li></ul></ul></ul>
    17. 17. iLabs at MIT Microelectronics device characterization (EECS, deployed 1998) Shake table (Civil Eng., deployed 2004) Dynamic signal analyzer (EECS, deployed 2004) Polymer crystallization (Chem. E., deployed 2003) Heat exchanger (Chem. E., deployed 2001)
    18. 18. The iLab Vision Service Broker Lab Server Client Campus network Internet University Databases <ul><li>Order of magnitude more lab experiences </li></ul><ul><li>More lab time to users/researchers </li></ul><ul><li>More sophisticated labs available </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of scholars created around iLabs sharing educational & research content </li></ul>
    19. 19. iLabs Elsewhere <ul><li>University of Queensland </li></ul><ul><li>DUT (China) iLabs- Several in EE </li></ul><ul><li>Others </li></ul><ul><li>iLabs Consortium </li></ul>electromotor system elevator system triple-tank system
    20. 20. MIT Visualizing Cultures
    21. 21. MIT Visualizing Cultures Leveraging Image Content
    22. 22. Outcomes — MIT faculty case study <ul><li>Professor Karen Willcox, MIT Dept. of Aeronautics & Astronautics </li></ul><ul><li>Teaches required aero/astro course to MIT juniors </li></ul><ul><li>Surprised to find many MIT students were less proficient in relevant math than she expected </li></ul><ul><li>“ For example, even though I relied heavily on material from [Differential Equations], I had no idea how it was being taught -- or what was being taught.” </li></ul><ul><li>Now refers students to relevant OCW course sites, with problem sets, as a “ flashback ” to what math they need to understand for her course </li></ul><ul><li>“ Down the line, I’d like to bring more of the technology into the classroom, so that while I was giving a lecture, I could give them a flashback to something they had seen in a previous course… This will create better linkages, and to fully integrate the learning experience.” </li></ul>
    23. 23. Spoken Lecture Browser Deeper learning and Leveraged Resources
    24. 24. OE Value Proposition Micro and Macro Transformative Influence <ul><li>Open high quality digitized educational content, tools and communities </li></ul><ul><li>Available anytime, anywhere (for free/at cost?) </li></ul><ul><li>Localizable and re-mixable </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for collective improvement and feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Alternate way to learn: Accelerate/deepen learning </li></ul><ul><li>Supports Innovative Practice ( Teaching as Research) </li></ul><ul><li>Alters the economics of educational delivery </li></ul><ul><li>Scaling excellence </li></ul>
    25. 25. Readiness for Opening Up Education- I? <ul><li>Content: Finding; Getting; Using </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ Water Water Everywhere, Nor Any Drop to Drink” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>- Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner(Coleridge </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Content is King but Context Rules </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disaggregation; Differentiation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ordering the digital disorder ( (Baring .NE. Sharing ) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tacit Knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>KEEP/Knowledge Commons </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Technology and Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Impact Choice and Participation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unintended innovation at the edge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li> Design for Agency (Kahle); The Gates are Shut ( Stuart Lee) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OKI ambition </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. In Search of Useful Open Resources <ul><li>OCW Finder :: ocwfinder.org </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Search and browse across OCWs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OCW Consortium also has a search at www.ocwconsortium.org/use/use-dynamic.html </li></ul></ul><ul><li>OER Recommender :: oerrecommender.org </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Related” resources from selected collections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plug-in for Firefox </li></ul></ul>07/22/09
    27. 27. http://commons.carnegiefoundation.org All of these are freely available to the public! Web 2.0 Niche CoP, Social learning about T&L
    28. 28. Architecture for Choice , Portability and Sustainability Enterprise Applications - Monolithic
    29. 29. Enterprise Applications - Factored
    30. 30. Ease of Application Portability and Infrastructure Transition
    31. 31. Many Apps Many Repositories
    32. 32. Readiness for Opening Up Education – II Organizational Cultural factors <ul><li>Institutional Inertial Frames and Invariants </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scarcity vs. Abundance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reliance on Situated Learning; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Push Teaching Vs Demand Pull Learning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sense Making </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ordering the digital disorder </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pedagogical Shifts </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Individual learning -> collaborative, social learning </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Co-development of knowledge with learners </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accountability and Accreditation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Massification implications for Quality and Preparation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Distributed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Open Knowledge and Learning </li></ul></ul></ul>
    33. 33. <ul><li>Investigate the Transformative Potential and ecological transitions </li></ul><ul><li>Systemic Consideration of Programs. Practices and Priorities </li></ul><ul><li>Re-contextualize Invariants </li></ul><ul><li>Build receptivity and support for the use of open educational resources at many levels. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Resources towards building support and capacity for faculty and students; Effective Professional and leadership development </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Make Practice and Knowledge Visible and Shareable. </li></ul><ul><li>Make Open Education Solutions Sustainable. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Programmatic and technical integration </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Synthesis and synergy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Governance to take advantage of both widely distributed nature and collectivity in leading their efforts? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>Recommendations
    34. 34. “ What is the problem to which headlamp washer-wipers are the solution?” Neil Postman. Educom Conference 1992 <ul><li>Quality Learning Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Transformations in Form </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Traditional  Blended </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Transformations in Function </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowing  Affecting and Changing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A Pedagogy of Abundance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connected; Continuous; Collective </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sustainable Ecology: A Circle of Knowledge Building and Sharing </li></ul>
    35. 35. <ul><li>Open Architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Open Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Open Systems </li></ul><ul><li>(+ Open Mind) </li></ul><ul><li> Open Education </li></ul>Elements of the Ecology Open Content Open Tools
    36. 36.
    37. 37. If We Don’t See You in the Future… ….. <ul><li>… .. We Will See You in the Pasture </li></ul>

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