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Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
Polf19
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Polf19

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Published in: Entertainment & Humor, Sports
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  • Sources:http://paidcontent.org/article/419-analyst-whacks-entertainment-industry-digital-too-disuprtive/ http://robertoigarza.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/rep-entertainment-industry-market-statistics-mp-2007.pdf *Please see excel file “Sales” for the data and graph of DVD vs. VHS Units sold (other graph was copied and pasted from online http://paidcontent.org/article/419-analyst-whacks-entertainment-industry-digital-too-disuprtive/)
  • See excel sheet “DVD Vs. VHS” Source: http://www.cfs.purdue.edu/richardfeinberg/csr%20406%20e%20retailing%202009/factbook_2007.pdf (page 67)
  • Transcript

    • 1. December 1, 2011
    • 2. Film Industry Data Projects <ul><li>Spring 2011 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Elliott Gensler </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lexi Lessaris </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parker Mantell </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Raymond Raff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jake Stineker </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fall 2011 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Allison Fox </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>James Lynch </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Andrew Weiss </li></ul></ul>
    • 3. Data from Gene Brown’s Movie Time
    • 4. Data from MPAA.com
    • 5. Box office revenue U.S./Canada Box Office <ul><li>Source: Rentrak Corporation – Box Office Essentials. Includes box office generated during the calendar year from January 1-December 31, 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>MPAA calculates international box office country-by-country based on a variety of data sources, including Rentrak Corporation, local sources, Screen Digest, and others. 2009 international box office was revised due to a change by source. </li></ul>2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 % Change 10 vs. 09 % Change 10 vs. 06 U.S./Canada $9.2 $9.6 $9.6 $10.6 $10.6 -- 15% International $16.3 $16.6 $18.1 $18.8 $21.2 13% 30% Total $25.5 $26.3 $27.8 $29.4 $31.8 8% 25%
    • 6. Revenue analysis <ul><li>ticket prices are increasing much faster than inflation </li></ul>
    • 7. Average ticket price for a family of four (US$)
    • 8. Rapidly Growing Importance of 3D Box Office Revenues (US/Canada), Billions of Dollars, 2006-2010
    • 9.  
    • 10.  
    • 11. Data from Gene Brown’s Movie Time and MPAA.com
    • 12. Data from Gene Brown’s Movie Time and www.census.gov
    • 13. Effect of TV Ownership on Movie Theatre Attendance Data from Gene Brown’s Movie Time
    • 14. U.S./Canada ethnicity proportion of total population, moviegoers and tickets sold
    • 15. U.S./Canada annual per capita attendance averages by age
    • 16.  
    • 17.  
    • 18. Top 5 Grossing Distributors (1995-2011) <ul><li>An interesting aspect to note is the movie count versus to average gross count. Although Sony distributed more movies than did Warner Brothers, their average gross was significantly lower </li></ul><ul><li>With only 77 movies distributed, Dreamworks SKG was able to edge Miramax's 377 films and MGM’s 229 </li></ul>4 Studio Name Movie Count Total Gross Average Gross Marker Share Warner Bros. 489 $25,862,943,704 $52,889,455 14.34% Walt Disney 432 $25,819,313,401 $59,766,929 14.32% Sony Pictures 508 $23,576,817,238 $46,411,058 13.07% Paramount 329 $21,149,601,523 $64,284,503 11.73% 20 th Century Fox 342 $20,117,861,634 $58,824,157 11.16%
    • 19. Top 5 All Time Grossing Films 7 Film Total Gross (in millions) Avatar $759,563 Titanic $600,788 The Dark Knight $533,184 Star Wars $460,998 Shrek 2 $437,212
    • 20. Hollywood’s Top Earners (2009) 9 <ul><li>All gained 2009 revenue as directors from feature films except Steven Spielberg </li></ul><ul><li>Spielberg gained his tremendous 2009 income from Universal theme-park royalties and consulting </li></ul><ul><li>For his work in Harry Potter, , Daniel Radcliffe was the top earner among actors with $41 million </li></ul>Name Total Earned (in millions) Michael Bay $125 Steven Spielberg $85 Roland Emmerich $70 James Cameron $50 Todd Phillips $44
    • 21. VHS, DVD, VOD, BluRay Revenues, 1981-2010
    • 22. Home Video Market (2009) <ul><li>Although DVD sales have not been thriving, they still continue to dominate the home video market, as it accounts for 63% of it </li></ul>11
    • 23. DVD vs. VHS Sales Trends <ul><li>Circa 2002 percent of home videos being VHS vs. DVDs were equal </li></ul><ul><li>DVDs now currently account for almost 100% of home video sales, </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(opposite in 1997) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DVDs (in units sold) have begun to decrease slowly in 2006, perhaps due to other ways of watching film at home </li></ul><ul><li>VHS Sales have fallen dramatically since 2003. In 2007 sales were at 300,000 units </li></ul>
    • 24. DVD vs. VHS Sales Trends Continued
    • 25. Movie Rental Business Trends <ul><li>Blockbuster went bankrupt in 2010 because of poor business decisions </li></ul><ul><li>More consumers enjoy the convenience of Netflix and online downloads. </li></ul>
    • 26. How Netflix Won the Market <ul><li>The Pareto rule says that 80% of your revenue will come from 20% of your products. </li></ul><ul><li>Blockbuster would only stock the most popular 20% of movies because of limited shelf space. </li></ul>
    • 27. How Netflix Won the Market <ul><li>Netflix did not have shelf space issues and could stock 100% of the movies capitalizing on the 20% that Blockbuster could not. </li></ul><ul><li>Offered convenience of downloadable movies. </li></ul><ul><li>Netflix attracted customers with their unlimited monthly rental program. </li></ul>
    • 28. The chart shows that the United States has the most illegal downloads of movies topping out at a value $1.3 billion dollars.

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