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Socialmedia Socialmedia Document Transcript

  • HRSA Web Content TransformationSocial Media PlanMarch 29, 2010
  • HRSA Web Content Transformation Social Media PlanPrepared by_ Aquilent, Inc. 1100 West Street, Laurel, MD 20707 aquilent.comPrepared for_ HRSA Office of Web CommunicationsSubmitted_ March 29, 2010
  • Table of Contents1 Overview ............................................................................................... 1 1.1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................ 1 1.2 Organization ..................................................................................................................................... 1 1.3 Defining Social Media ....................................................................................................................... 12 Defining Users ....................................................................................... 1 2.1 User Research ................................................................................................................................... 2 2.2 Potential Users ................................................................................................................................. 3 2.3 Audience Types................................................................................................................................. 43 Define Goals .......................................................................................... 5 3.1 Increase Awareness, Interest, & Participation ................................................................................. 5 3.2 Better Manage Reputation & Brand................................................................................................. 5 3.3 Enhance Customer Service ............................................................................................................... 6 3.4 Promote Existing Content................................................................................................................. 7 3.5 Develop New Content ...................................................................................................................... 74 Measuring Results ................................................................................. 7 4.1 Increase Awareness, Interest, & Participation ................................................................................. 8 4.2 Manage Reputation & Brand ............................................................................................................ 8 4.3 Enhance Customer Service ............................................................................................................... 8 4.4 Promote Existing Content................................................................................................................. 8 4.5 Develop New Content ...................................................................................................................... 85 Consistent Messages ............................................................................. 96 Selecting Social Media Technologies ...................................................... 9 6.1 Types of Engagement ....................................................................................................................... 9 6.2 Serving Audiences, Advancing Goals .............................................................................................. 12 6.3 Recommendations.......................................................................................................................... 167 Next Steps ........................................................................................... 173/29/10 i
  • Appendix A: User Research Results .......................................................... 183/29/10 ii
  • Table of Figures Figure 1: Social Media Tools Used .......................................................................................................... 2 Figure 2: Number of Social Media Tools Used ....................................................................................... 3 Figure 3: Number of Hits in Top 50 Google Results Attributable To User ............................................. 3 Table of Tables Table 1: Document Organization............................................................................................................ 1 Table 2: Audiences for HRSA Content .................................................................................................... 4 Table 3: Goal 1—Increase Awareness, Interest & Participation ............................................................ 5 Table 4: Goal 2—Manage Reputation & Brand ...................................................................................... 6 Table 5: Goal 3—Enhance Customer Service ......................................................................................... 6 Table 6: Goal 4—Promote Existing Content ........................................................................................... 7 Table 7: Goal 5—Develop New Content................................................................................................. 7 Table 8: Messages .................................................................................................................................. 9 Table 9: Tools and Types of Social Media Engagement ......................................................................... 9 Table 10: Mapping Tools to Levels of Effort, Audiences Served, and Goals Advanced ....................... 12 Table 11: Recommended Social Media Efforts .................................................................................... 16 Table 12: User 1 .................................................................................................................................... 19 Table 13: User 2 .................................................................................................................................... 20 Table 14: User 3 .................................................................................................................................... 20 Table 15: User 4 .................................................................................................................................... 21 Table 16: User 5 .................................................................................................................................... 21 Table 17: User 6 .................................................................................................................................... 21 Table 18: User 7 .................................................................................................................................... 22 Table 19: User 8 .................................................................................................................................... 22 Table 20: User 9 .................................................................................................................................... 233/29/10 iii
  • Table 21: User 10 .................................................................................................................................. 23 Table 22: User 11 .................................................................................................................................. 243/29/10 iv
  • 1 OverviewAquilent was contracted by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to transform itsweb content strategies. As part of Option Year One of that contract, Aquilent is crafting a social mediaplan.This plan will guide strategy development for a HRSA social media presence that: Ensures citizen-focused delivery of information Enhances communication of HRSA mission and activities through use of multiple channels Better targets specific audiences and delivers timely messages and information to themAquilent recommends HRSA become more involved in social media, to help create, disseminate, andshape an ongoing dialog with citizens about HRSA as it provides national leadership, program resourcesand services needed to improve access to culturally competent, quality health care.1.1 ScopeThis document is intended to establish a framework to guide HRSA’s Office of Web Communication’sfurther adoption of social media as a communication tool to guide bureau- and program-specific socialmedia plans.1.2 OrganizationThis document is divided into 7 sections, as outlined in Table 1, below: Table 1: Document Organization Section Number Section Title 1 Introduction 2—5 Foundation for Social Media Planning 6—7 Selecting and Implementing Social Media Tools Appendix A User Research Results1.3 Defining Social MediaAny media that encourages interaction among users can be called social media. For the purposes of thisdocument, we will restrict our discussion to electronic social media, with the understanding that othermedia will support the same overall communication and brand goals.2 Defining UsersThe first step to developing a social media plan is to discover who your users are, and how they usesocial media. Questions HRSA must ask about its users include: Do they use social media tools? Which social media tools do they use? If they do use them, how do they use them? What users are not using social media tools, and why?3/29/10 1
  • 2.1 User ResearchAquilent undertook an online user research project to help answer these questions. Fullmethodology and results are reported in Appendix A. We identified 11 people who had either“friended” HRSA on a social media site, or posted content specifically mentioning HRSA. Oncethese research subjects were identified, we searched for signs of their participation in astandard set of social media tools.Figure 1 (below) shows how many of the test subjects use each of the studied tools. 3 1 7 Facebook MySpace LinkedIn 5 Twitter Link Sharing Other 5 5 Figure 1: Social Media Tools UsedFacebook is used by the majority of the research subjects. MySpace, LinkedIn, and Twitter each have thesame number of users in our subject group; slightly less than half of the subjects use one or more ofthose tools. Link sharing tools—such as StumbleUpon and Digg—were only used by one subject, whoused more than one link sharing tool. Three of the subjects were found to use other social media tools,such as blogs and professional online communities of interest.Subjects used the social media tools for a mix of professional and personal communication. Somefrequent uses include: Seeking employment or employment advice Sharing information about HRSA programs and procedures Debating health policy issues Identifying relationship with or interest in HRSAMost of the subjects used multiple social media tools, as shown in Figure 2, below. Several users postedsimilar or identical content to multiple sites—e.g. both Facebook and Twitter. This is not surprising, as itstands to reason that subjects’ social networks overlap from site to site, as do the networks’ interests.3/29/10 2
  • 6 5 5 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 0 User 1 User 2 User 3 User 4 User 5 User 6 User 7 User 8 User 9 User User 10 11 Figure 2: Number of Social Media Tools UsedTo ensure we captured a full picture of the subjects’ social media usage, we searched Google for them,using only publically-available identifiable information, and evaluated how many of the top 50 Googlesearch results were reasonably attributable to each subject. More than half of the subjects accountedfor 8% of the results for their searches; three subjects had over 75% attributable search, as seen inFigure 3 below. 50 45 43 39 38 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 2 0 0 User 1 User 2 User 3 User 4 User 5 User 6 User 7 User 8 User 9 User User 10 11 Figure 3: Number of Hits in Top 50 Google Results Attributable To User2.2 Potential UsersBy design, this research only captures information about people who are already using social media tointeract in some way with HRSA. Citizens who either do not use social media or have not mentioned3/29/10 3
  • HRSA in some way are not accounted for. Missing from the sample group are: People without college education Patients at health centers People over 60 years old MinorsThis does not mean that these people are not using social media, or are not interested in HRSA.American citizens are online, in ever-increasing numbers, across all user demographics. As they use theinternet more, they are engaging in social media more, and using these tools to evaluate and changetheir communities.Eighty percent of American adults use the internet, according to the 2009 Digital Future Report.1 Eightypercent of those users have broadband access, double the level in 2004.One of the fastest-growing segments of internet users is people over the age of 66. This demographichas increased 33 percent since 2000. Fully 40% of these Americans are using the internet.Users report increasing time as members of online communities – online communities have become“stickier,” encouraging people to stay and participate longer than they had previously. According to arecent Pew Internet and American Life Project study, 19% of adult internet users –nearly one-fifth of theusers—are now using Twitter (up from 11% in April). Indeed, TNS and the Conference Board’s ConsumerInternet Barometer shows more than one third of male internet users and nearly one half of femaleinternet users report visiting social networks in the second quarter of 2009. In each age range reported,there was 10-20% growth in social network usage.Any future user research should include questions about social media usage, especially for thosesegments of the population not represented in the recent research sample.2.3 Audience TypesSynthesizing user research results with general internet usage statistics and stakeholder interviews,Aquilent has defined six audience types, as shown in Table 2, below. Table 2: Audiences for HRSA Content Audience Types  Healthcare professionals  Healthcare administrators  Healthcare students  Policy advocates & government officials  Media  General public, including underserved populationsThese types are mapped to social media tools and goals in Table 10, below.1 2009 Digital Future Report, Center for the Digital Future at USC’s Annenberg School for Communication.3/29/10 4
  • 3 Define GoalsAquilent recommends a user-centered approach to defining social media goals. While HRSA is in theprocess of articulating organization-wide communication goals as part of an on-going branding effort,we can still advance the social media plan, and assume that social media efforts will support theeventual overall communication goals. Suggested goals for HRSA’s social media plan include: Increase citizen awareness of, interest in, and participation with HRSA Better manage HRSA’s reputation and brand Enhanced customer service, with faster, more personalized response to user concerns Drive users to existing content Develop new content to meet user interests3.1 Increase Awareness, Interest, & ParticipationUser research with health center patients showed awareness of and interest in HRSA programs andactivities. However, users had no awareness of what HRSA itself was. HRSA grantees, who are bydefinition invested in HRSA programs and activities, often identify more strongly with grant-sponsoringbureaus than with HRSA itself.Building up HRSA’s social media presence can mitigate this. Highlighting programs and activities inmultiple different social media will increase the likelihood that potential users will discover the contentand act upon it. HRSA can leverage its association with HHS and other government entities, reposting orcommenting upon their content, and seeking opportunities for building content together. Table 3: Goal 1—Increase Awareness, Interest & Participation Goal 1: Increase Awareness, Interest, & Participation  Generate awareness of the organization; and provide complete, accurate, and timely information, so users have tools for making informed decisions.  Reinforce the relationship between HRSA and its bureaus.  Promote social media efforts in other social media spaces.  Subscribe to, friend, or follow related government agencies and programs.3.2 Better Manage Reputation & BrandOnline research shows that many users think of HRSA as somewhat suspect. The following “tweets”were in the top results when searching Twitter for “HRSA” in early November 2009: @Ryanwhiteponce HHS Awards $5 Million to Spur Innovation in HIV/AIDS Care to Women of Color http://newsroom.hrsa.gov/releases/2009/womenofcolor.htm @HBDirk #HumanRights Movement for children Vaccine Victims #Autism like Injury #NoVoice and #NoChoice #36shots #1Flushot #desiree #hannah #HRSA.gov @Autismdiaries Wow. what is that all about? Poisoning our kids??? National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program http://www.hrsa.gov/vaccine @Autismdiaries You MUST Check this out! National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program http://www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation/table.htm3/29/10 5
  •  @HBDirk #UWAC #Autism Civil Rights Movement 1-91children 1-58boys CDC HRSA HHS Vaccine Injury Human Rights Movement 1929 1986 1989 2002 2006 2009 @clt2atl @SchwinnSwan Since you still seem to be unlcear on the 1986 law PROTECTING vacc mfgrs: http://www.hrsa.gov/Vaccinecompensation/ @lucidicus HRSA is giving grants to train new doctors, but only to "minority" or "disadvantaged" students. http://tinyurl.com/ylarl5fWithout an active HRSA presence on Twitter, these comments go unanswered for the most part. Activeparticipation in Twitter, in this case, could ensure that factual information is as accessible to Twitterusers as is less accurate information. HRSA’s absence in the space allows detractors to frame thediscussion on their own.HRSA should construct and project a consistent organizational identity that carries over through allsocial media and other online spaces. Some elements of identity construction to consider include: Vocabulary. Writing style. Interaction style. Opinions.In short, every piece of information HRSA puts out into the social space shapes HRSA’s identity, and tellsthe HRSA story. Others can evaluate future information against that identity to decide whether to trustthe information, and how to react to it. HRSA will benefit from a consistent, truthful presentation ofcorporate personality because that consistency helps a user feel like the organization has a unified senseof self. Table 4: Goal 2—Manage Reputation & Brand Goal 2: Manage Reputation & Brand  Discover and counter misinformation about HRSA programs and activities.  Regularly audit HRSA-generated social media content for brand-adherence.3.3 Enhance Customer ServiceSocial media has been described as, essentially, a conversation. If HRSA is to shape conversations aboutits programs and activities, it must participate, and must do so strategically, engaging the users, wherethe users are, on topics the users want to explore. Users who are already interacting with HRSA in socialmedia where HRSA has an active presence can reasonably expect responses to questions andcomments. It is important that these responses come in a timely manner, preferably within one day ofthe original comment. Social media information grows stale quickly.Many social media users will be questioning and commenting on HRSA programs and activities withoutdirectly interacting with HRSA itself. Discovering these comments will help grow HRSA’s social mediapresence in a natural, organic way. Monitoring mentions of HRSA and major HRSA programs in majorsocial media spaces will afford opportunities to serve these customers, who might otherwise go withoutany authoritative information.HRSA has a well-established online customer service tool, http://answers.hrsa.gov. Cross-promotion willlet users know they have several options for interacting with HRSA, and drive them to the most up-to-date answers to common questions. Table 5: Goal 3—Enhance Customer Service3/29/10 6
  • Goal 3: Enhance Customer Service  Monitor user comments in HRSA’s social media, and respond to questions within one business day.  Regularly monitor user comments and references to HRSA in major social media, and respond to discovered questions in a timely manner.  Promote social media efforts on http://answers.hrsa.gov.3.4 Promote Existing ContentHRSA has a wealth of information online, on its website and with its social media efforts. HRSATube hasnearly 60 videos, and 143 subscribers. The channel has been viewed over 5,000 times, with nearly 8,000upload views. If subscribers were responsible for all the upload views, each subscriber would havewatched each video an average of 133 times; odds are slim that subscriptions are responsible for theimpressive viewing numbers. Instead, HRSA’s rigorous cross promotion of HRSATube content across itssocial media and other communication efforts is driving the HRSATube success. Applying this level ofrigor to promoting other new and existing content should provide similar success in attracting userattention. Focusing on new content and time-sensitive information—e.g. application deadlines orevents—leverages the ephemeral nature of social media content. Table 6: Goal 4—Promote Existing Content Goal 2: Promote Existing Content  Provide summaries of and links to new and existing content.  Highlight HRSA-sponsored or -attended meetings and events.  Inform users of application opening and closing dates for all time-sensitive applications.3.5 Develop New ContentDeploying tools that allow users to rate, comment , or otherwise evaluate content gives users the sensethat they are contributing to HRSA’s message. Taking those ratings, comments, and evaluations andacting upon them to alter or develop widgets, articles, applications, and other content, as well asinformation architecture and other user interfaces builds on the promise of user-centeredcommunication and social media. Table 7: Goal 5—Develop New Content Goal 5: Develop New Content  Provide method for user feedback on http://www.hrsa.gov.  Monitor user feedback, and alter or create content—e.g. widgets, articles, applications—in response to user needs.4 Measuring ResultsDefining goals can direct HRSA’s social media efforts, and measuring goals will keep those efforts ontrack. Though each social media tool will have its own hallmarks of success, some general metrics areprovided below. There is some overlap between metrics for the goals, as the goals are often served bythe same technologies and methods. To keep track of performance metrics, HRSA can use a simplespreadsheet, which will enable some basic statistical analysis without prohibitive expense.3/29/10 7
  • 4.1 Increase Awareness, Interest, & Participation Number of followers Number followed by HRSA Number of posts made by HRSA Number of comments received Number of responses posted by HRSA Number of follow-up comments received Comment topics, by subject/bureau4.2 Manage Reputation & Brand Number of comments received Time until response Number of responses posted by HRSA Number of follow-up comments received4.3 Enhance Customer Service Number of sites monitored Number of comments received Number of responses posted by HRSA Number of follow-up comments received Track click-throughs to source URLs, by campaign or effort4.4 Promote Existing Content Number of summaries or links posted Number of time-sensitive postings (meetings, events, application deadlines) Track click-throughs to source URLS, by post4.5 Develop New Content Number of positive ratings received Number of negative ratings received Number of comments received on website content Number of responses made to comments on website content New widgets deployed Usage statistics for widgets Track locations widgets reused3/29/10 8
  • 5 Consistent MessagesHRSA’s social media plan should have strong themes as its foundation. The plan should support,reinforce and reflect the communication and social media goals established by the organization, andshould support the overall mission. This can be done through using consistent messages, across allplatforms and channels. Table 8: Messages Messages  HRSA responds to the need for underserved Americans’ health, through its bureaus and programs.  HRSA provides training for compassionate health professionals, through its bureaus and programs.  HRSA operates transparently, and welcomes dialogue with the public.  HRSA is responsive to citizen and stakeholder concerns.6 Selecting Social Media TechnologiesHRSA has already begun utilizing several social media technologies: Facebook: HRSA has over 1,200 fans, averages approximately 600 page views per week, and regularly posts links to website content and videos. YouTube: HRSAtube, HRSA’s YouTube channel, has received over 5,300 channel views, and over 10,100 upload views. 155 users subscribe to HRSAtube videos. MySpace: HRSA’s MySpace presence is relatively new, and has yet to find its footing and voice; that being said, HRSA has 7 friends.Each of the technologies advances different goals and serves different—though sometimesoverlapping—audiences. Once the organization has defined its social media goals, and discovered whatsocial media its users actually use, it can then make good decisions about choosing social media tools.6.1 Types of EngagementJust as there are different types of social media tools, there are different levels of engagement. Table 9: Tools and Types of Social Media Engagement Tool Type Representative Technology Types of Engagement  Organization crafts content  WordPress  Users read content, and comment publiclyBlog  Percussion social media add-on  Organization responds to comments publicly  User tags content they are interested in  delicious  Other bookmark users discover contentBookmarks  Stumbleupon  Organization may assist bookmarking by  Digg placing bookmark tools on content pages3/29/10 9
  • Tool Type Representative Technology Types of Engagement News clipping  Organization engages in ongoing researchBrand  to discover what is being said about themonitoring  Custom RSS aggregator organization, and where  Users and organization create contentDiscussion  BBSboards  Users and organization respond to content,  Usenet and to others’ responses publicly  Organization posts relevant images to a  Flickr public siteImage sharing  Picasa  Users can comment on images, post to other social media sites, add tags, etc.  Organization creates short blips of content  Users respond to content, publicly orMicroblog  Twitter privately  Organization responds, publicly or privately  Organizations produce contentPodcasts  iTunes  Users download content and listen to or watch on their computers, mobile devices, etc.  Organization’s content is automatically repurposed for syndication feedsRSS  Percussion CMS add-on  Users, including other organizations, follow and repurpose syndicated content  Facebook  Users and organization create contentSocial  MySpace  Users and organization respond to content,networks  LinkedIn and to others’ responses publicly  Users respond to contentUser ratings  Percussion CMS add-on  Organization analyzes ratings, and adapts content to enhance future ratings  Organization posts relevant videos to a public siteVideo sharing  YouTube  Users can comment on videos, post to other social media sites, add tags, etc.  Organization creates virtual space and avatars to interact with usersVirtual worlds  Second Life  Users, immersed in the virtual world, interact with organization representatives, educational content, etc.Widgets  Custom  Organization creates and shares code to distribute windows into organization3/29/10 10
  • Tool Type Representative Technology Types of Engagement resources  Users post widgets to their social media spaces, giving their own users access to organization resources  Organization and users collaborativelyWikis  NotePub create and edit content3/29/10 11
  • 6.2 Serving Audiences, Advancing Goals Table 10: Mapping Tools to Levels of Effort, Audiences Served, and Goals Advanced Primary Audiences Tool Type Level of Effort Goals Advanced Comments Served  Blogs are most valuable when  Set Up: Low they encourage user comments  Policy & government  Increase awarenessBlog  Ongoing: and discussion.  Media  Develop new content High  Percussion’s Community Manager provides blogging capabilities.  Though user research didn’t show  Set Up: Low  Policy & government  Increase awareness high numbers of link sharing usage, we can predict higherBookmarks  Ongoing:  Media  Promote existing usage in the future as “Share Low  General public content This” has been rolled out on the site.  Monitoring any one medium is relatively easy; each additional  Set Up: medium adds to level of effort  Manage reputationBrand Medium  Policy & government  Enhance customer  Possible to use automated searchmonitoring  Ongoing:  General public service tools to monitor multiple media Medium  Include government and advocacy websites  Healthcare  Increase awareness  Set Up: professionals  Manage reputation  Sponsoring a discussion board or Medium Healthcare forum requires a high level ofDiscussion   Enhance customer administrators effort in content creation,boards  Ongoing: service comment monitoring, and High  Healthcare students  Promote content community building  General public  Develop content3/29/10 12
  • Primary Audiences Tool Type Level of Effort Goals Advanced Comments Served  Images put a face on an  Set Up: Low  Policy & government organization, humanizing it andImage  Increase awareness  Ongoing:  Media enhancing trustsharing  Develop content Low  General public  Content easily repurposed into other social media technologies  Healthcare students  Reach users on many platforms—  Increase awareness  Healthcare computer, phone, etc.—through  Set Up: Low administrators  Manage reputation one interfaceMicroblog  Ongoing:  Enhance customer  Policy & government  Enables rapid information Medium service  Media dissemination in crisis or  Promote content mutable situations  General public  Helps users with auditory learning styles  Set Up: High  Users can digest long-form  Healthcare students  Increase awarenessPodcasts  Ongoing: content while away from their  General public  Develop content computers Medium  Procuring quality recording equipment may be prohibitive  Healthcare students  Built in to Percussion’s  Set Up: Low  Increase awareness Community Manager  Policy & governmentRSS  Ongoing:  Manage reputation  Users access content through  Media Low  Promote content their personal choice of  General public interface  Set Up: Low  Healthcare  Increase awareness  Creating content for multiple professionals social networks is time-Social  Ongoing:  Manage reputation intensive, but content can benetworks Medium—  Healthcare  Enhance customer repurposed for other social High administrators service networks and media3/29/10 13
  • Primary Audiences Tool Type Level of Effort Goals Advanced Comments Served  Healthcare students  Promote content  Tailor content to audiences—e.g.  Policy & government post all job opportunities to professional networks like  Media LinkedIn, but perhaps not to  General public disease support forums  Healthcare providers  Built in to Percussion’s  Increase awareness  Set Up: Low  Healthcare Community Manager administrators  Enhance customerUser ratings  Ongoing:  Feedback can be displayed on the service Low  Health care students website, or just relayed to  Develop content content owners  General public  Healthcare students  Images put a face on an  Set Up: Low organization, humanizing it andVideo  Policy & government  Increase awareness  Ongoing: enhancing trust.sharing  Media  Develop content Low  Helps users with auditory and  General public visual learning styles  High level of effort to establish  Policy &  Increase awareness and maintain presence; do not  Set Up: High government recommend unless furtherVirtual  Enhance customer  Ongoing: research shows large pool ofworlds  Media service High HRSA-interested users wanting  General public  Develop content virtual world interaction with HRSA  Healthcare  Set up level of effort varies for  Set Up:  Increase awareness professionals each widget depending on the Medium—  Enhance customer  Healthcare widget’s functionality.Widgets High service administrators  Ongoing level of effort for any  Ongoing:  Promote content  Healthcare students one widget is low; LoE increases Medium  Create content  General public with each subsequent widget3/29/10 14
  • Primary AudiencesTool Type Level of Effort Goals Advanced Comments Served  Healthcare professionals  Increase awareness  Set Up: High  Healthcare  Manage reputation  Organization and usersWikis  Ongoing: administrators  Enhance customer collaboratively create and edit Medium  Healthcare students service content  Policy &  Develop content Government3/29/10 15
  • 6.3 RecommendationsAquilent recommends HRSA focus on building its current social media presences, and adding to orenhancing the following social media tools: Table 11: Recommended Social Media Efforts Level of Effort: Recommended Tool Type Recommendation Set Up/Ongoing Technology AddThis bookmarking and link sharing tools have been added to some site content pages; Bookmarking/ Low/Low  AddThis future brand monitoring will likely discover link sharing other bookmarking and link sharing sites that should be added to the AddThis options. HRSA has a wealth of suitable content developed already, but it is not in any central repository. Sharing these images on Flickr— which has robust tagging capabilities—would Low/Low Image sharing  Flickr help HRSA staff locate appropriate images for online and traditional communications, as well as enhancing the visual offerings for the public. HRSA investment in Community Manager  Percussion allows roll-out of RSS for little additional Low/Low RSS Community expenditure. RSS feeds will let users customize Manager when and how they receive updated HRSA information. Community Manager will enable users to give  Percussion instant feedback to HRSA content owners. Low/Low User ratings Community Those owners can then create citizen-focused Manager content in response to user’s needs. HRSA’s initial YouTube efforts have been Low/Low Video sharing  YouTube successful, and should be continued. Policy advocates, government officials, and media use Twitter to generate leads and conversation, and even people who don’t tweet themselves read tweets that are repurposed on other sites. There is little effort Low/Medium Microblogging  Twitter needed to start a Twitter account, and maintaining it requires approximately the same level of effort as HRSA’s social networks. Research showed as many HRSA users use Twitter as do MySpace, Facebook, and LinkedIn.3/29/10 16
  • Level of Effort: Recommended Tool Type Recommendation Set Up/Ongoing Technology An ongoing brand monitoring initiative is Medium/ Brand necessary to ensure HRSA can react promptly  TBD Medium monitoring to issues and misinformation, and plan strategically for future efforts. Though widgets take a greater level of effort than the other recommended tools do, the Medium— benefits are great. Widgets give users a direct Widgets  TBD High/Medium path to tailored information, and allow other sites to repurpose authoritative HRSA content easily. HRSA’s Facebook efforts have been successful, and should be continued. Its MySpace presence is still in an early stage; more work on crafting content and building audience is necessary. Adding another social network to  Facebook HRSA’s offerings will require a greater level of Low/Medium— Social networks  MySpace effort to both set up and maintain than those High  LinkedIn tools mentioned above. However, LinkedIn is a popular site with health care administrators and providers, and a HRSA presence here can help those users form connections with their peers as well as learn about HRSA offerings and opportunities.Those tools and technologies with both a low level of effort to set up and maintain should be set up assoon as possible.As new tools gain popularity, they should be evaluated to see if they will enhance HRSA’s overall socialmedia presence by better addressing communication goals and user needs. Future iterations of thisdocument will chart the rewards of each type of engagement for user and for the organization. Whenstaff resources and Administration interest are in place, additional, more-collaborative social media maybe rolled out.7 Next Steps Review goals and messages Implement Percussion’s Community Manager, enabling RSS and user ratings Identify and train social media representatives Implement image sharing on Flickr Implement microblogging on Twitter Establish usage guidance for the new tools and technologies Establish metrics tracking system and procedures Define medium-specific goals for each technology implemented3/29/10 17
  • Appendix A:User Research ResultsResearch StudyAquilent conducted a research study of HRSA social media channels in March, 2010. The purpose of thisstudy was to assess which social media are used by people who are interested in HRSA. The results ofthis research will guide creation of social media goals, messages, and tools.During this study, eleven (11) individuals with declared interest in HRSA were tracked through aselection of social media channels and Google’s search engine. The purpose of this document is toreport the results of the research. This report includes a summary of participants and their social mediapresences.Test ParticipantsThe HRSA online user research study included eleven (11) subjects, who are representative users of theHRSA social media user population. Subjects were selected from four source sites:  Facebook  MySpace  LinkedIn  TwitterTo ensure a representative mix of users, the eleven participants were divided into four (4) sub-groups.The following are brief descriptions of each of the subject sub-groups.General requirements for all subjects:  self-identifies as a friend, fan, or follower of HRSA on a social media site; or mentions HRSA in a social media post  does not self identify as a HRSA employee or contractor in profile data  is a “real person,” not an organization, agency, or news feedPrivacyEach subject is represented in our reports and notes by a pseudonym; e.g. User 1, User 2. Allinformation collected is in the public sphere, and available to any holder of a basic, free account on thesocial media sites. Privacy restrictions put in place by the subject or the sites have been respected. Noneof the subjects were known to the researcher, nor affiliated with the researcher in any way on socialmedia.No live, in-person research was conducted. All data is publicly available.MethodAfter identifying a subject on a source site, the researcher searched for the subjects on the other studiedsites as well as three (3) link sharing services. Basic user characteristics were captured, including sex,age, geographic location, and profession.Next, each subject was searched for in Google, to gauge that subject’s online presence andpossible participation in other social media sites. The top fifty (50) search results for each wereanalyzed to determine if link could be reasonably attributed to that subject. This is scored asAttributable Hits in the tables below. In some cases, there were fewer than 50 search results for asubject; the Attributable Hits for those subjects reflect the actual number of search results, and3/29/10 18
  • have not been adjusted. Some subjects had very common names, or posted little uniqueinformation about themselves, and initial search results could not be attributed. When possible,additional data about those subjects were used to produce a more-targeted search result. Thesecases have been identified in the tables below.Any additional social media participation discovered through profile or search analysis wascaptured.FacebookThis group includes four (4) subjects who have self-identified as fans of HRSA.  Sex breakdown: 2 female, 2 male  Age range: late teens to late thirtiesMySpaceThis group includes two (2) subjects who have self-identified as friends of HRSA.  Sex breakdown: 2 female  Age range: mid 20s to early 40sLinkedInThis group includes three (3) subjects who participated in the Answers forum, and provided informationabout HRSA or HRSA programs.  Sex breakdown: 2 female, 1 male  Age range: late 40s to early 50sTwitterThis group includes two (2) subjects who tweeted about HRSA or HRSA programs.  Sex breakdown: 1 female, 1 male  Age range: late 30s to late 50s Table 12: User 1Source SiteFacebookConnection to HRSAFan of HRSA; physician’s assistant.Sex AgeFemale Early 20sGeographic Location Attributable HitsSan Pedro, CA 4/50Social Media Presence Facebook: 359 friends; protected profile; displays sex, location, networks, and pages; fan of 46 pages. PA-Link.com: Presumed to be a member, as is a fan of it on Facebook. This is a P.A.-only community, so her participation can not be evaluated. PA-Link has a social media poll on its public home page, and of 6 respondents, all used Facebook, and none used other3/29/10 19
  • social media sites.Comments User 1 is a graduate of a Hawaiian college or university. User is a Facebook fan of Learning Radiology, Association of Family Practice Physician Assistants, and Physician Assistants Web Community www.pa-link.com. Her Attributable Hits was calculated using her name, presumed title/profession, and state as search terms. Table 13: User 2Source SiteFacebookConnection to HRSAFan of HRSA; college studentSex AgeMale Late teens—early 20sGeographic Location Attributable HitsIthaca, NY 4/50Social Media Presence Facebook: 1,466 friends; protected profile shows networks & pages; fan of 72 pages. Twitter: possible account holder; however, if User 2 is the account holder, he has only tweeted once, and that was over a year ago.Comments User 2 includes a Hebrew word in his Facebook profile name; when that word is included in searches, his Attributable Hits is 4/7. He has created Facebook groups, and posts questions to organization pages. No direct connection with HRSA or HRSA programs and activities can be drawn from his Facebook pages. He is, however, a fan of the President. Table 14: User 3Source SiteFacebookConnection to HRSAFan of HRSA; MBA in Health Care AdministrationSex AgeMale 39Geographic Location Attributable HitsAtlanta, Georgia 4/50Social Media Presence Facebook: 279 friends; protected profile shows detailed personal information, education & work history, and pages; fan of 17 pages, including U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. Posts to oragization pages. LinkedIn: possible account holder; however, if User 3 is the account holder, he is not3/29/10 20
  • active with the site, having only one connection and no identifying information on a public profile.Comments User 3 is a recent MBA recipient, and is seeking employment in the public health field. He has posted to the HRSA Facebook page. Table 15: User 4Source SiteFacebookConnection to HRSAFan of HRSA; MD; medical school faculty memberSex AgeFemale Late 30sGeographic Location Attributable HitsIndianapolis, IN 39/50Social Media Presence Facebook: 296 friends; protected profile shows networks, sex, current city, and pages. Fan of 27 pages, including CDC and AIDS.gov. LinkedIn: 6 connections; basic profile information.Comments User 4’s full name, as shown on Facebook, gives a Attributable Hits of 4/4. Other physician HRSA Facebook fans also seem to use Facebook and LinkedIn as their social media tools. Table 16: User 5Source SiteLinkedInConnection to HRSAAnswered question about health care; health care management professionalSex AgeFemale Early 50sGeographic Location Attributable HitsRochester, NY 4/50Social Media Presence LinkedIn: detailed profile; active in forums. Twitter: limited participation; follows the Whitehouse, CNN, NPR, and a relative. Is followed by two people. Has not tweeted. Has marked one tweet as a Favorite.Comments User 5 advocates for low-cost health care professionally. She is very familiar with health center programs, Medicaid and Medicare. Table 17: User 63/29/10 21
  • Source SiteLinkedInConnection to HRSAAnswered question about health centers; health care grants managerSex AgeFemale 51Geographic Location Attributable HitsReading, MA 38/50Social Media Presence LinkedIn: detailed profile; has recommended other users. Twitter: has two accounts; one seems to have been abandoned in 2009. Now tweets extensively on health-related issues, with a high percentage of tweets being conversations with other Twitter users. Boston.com: has commented on articles from The Boston Globe.Comments User 6 is active in her community (church, politics, library, etc.). She has a strong interest in heal th care reform, as well as the grants writing process for health care providers; her social media presence is focused on these topics. Table 18: User 7Source SiteLinkedInConnection to HRSAAnswered question about nursing scholarships; college admissions professionalSex AgeMale 42Geographic Location Attributable HitsNampa, ID 4/50Social Media Presence LinkedIn: basic profile information; participates in Answers forum MySpace: not active; has very basic profile, hasn’t logged on since 2008.Comments Table 19: User 8Source SiteMySpaceConnection to HRSAFriend of HRSASex AgeFemale 42Geographic Location Attributable Hits3/29/10 22
  • St. John, VI 0/10Social Media Presence MySpace: last logged in this month, but last posted content 11 months ago; has shared vacation photos and playlists.Comments User 8’s Attributable Hits number is not a mistake—she does not have a Google presence. Adding in her location returns 1 good result: her MySpace profile. Table 20: User 9Source SiteMySpaceConnection to HRSAFriend of HRSASex AgeFemale 24Geographic Location Attributable HitsStroudsburg, PA 2/50Social Media Presence Facebook: 252 friends; protected profile with moderately detailed information revealed; fan of 5 pages, including Breast Cancer Awareness MySpace: private profile; has logged on this month.Comments Table 21: User 10Source SiteTwitterConnection to HRSARetweeted mention of Dr. Wakefield; health centers advocateSex AgeMale 59Geographic Location Attributable HitsLyndhurst, VA 43/50Social Media Presence Facebook: protected profile, but shares detailed information and all wall posts. 219 friends; fan of 64 pages, most of which are health centers or health policy-related. LinkedIn: detailed profile, with 72 connections. Twitter: following 98, followed by 161. 274 tweets in total. Digg: no recent activity. Mr. Tweet: recommended by one user. Topsy: posted 273 links. Blogs: blogs about health center advocacy issues for an association.3/29/10 23
  • Comments User 10’s social media presence is sharply focused on health centers advocacy. Table 22: User 11Source SiteTwitterConnection to HRSATweeted about Stop Bullying Now; natural health consultantSex AgeFemale 37Geographic Location Attributable HitsMarblehead, MA 4/100Social Media Presence Facebook: protected profile, but shares her wall content. 296 friends, fan of 11 pages. LinkedIn: detailed profile; 44 connections. Twitter: following 64, followed by 53; mix of original posts, retweets, and conversations, focused on women’s health and empowerment.Comments3/29/10 24