Yearbook photography

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My advice to High School yearbook photographers.

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Yearbook photography

  1. 1. Yearbook Photography
  2. 2. Get Up Close! Use a long-range lens. Put yourself in a position to get close shots.
  3. 3. Get Up Close! Use a long-range lens. Put yourself in a position to get close shots.
  4. 4. Get Up Close! Use a long-range lens. Put yourself in a position to get close shots.
  5. 5. Try different angles Bird’s Eye
  6. 6. Try different angles Worm’s Eye
  7. 7. Try different angles Worm’s Eye
  8. 8. Try different angles Tilted Something in the foreground
  9. 9. Try different angles Tilted Something in the foreground
  10. 10. Look out for weird or busy backgrounds Too much red/black against red/black. Even if Ms. Leake had been looking at the camera, we couldn’t use it. Change your angle so that the object has a neutral background. WAAAAY too busy.
  11. 11. Go for UNPOSED photos Not every photo can be people looking at the camera saying “cheese!” That’s boring. It’s OK to have a few…but not every photo. Let them say “cheese,” but then take another few shots when they’re done being cheesy. Posing!
  12. 12. Go for some UNPOSED photos Not every photo can be people looking at the camera saying “cheese!” That’s boring. Posing!
  13. 13. Photography Advice #1 Emotion is good. Sometimes we laugh, sometimes we cry or get angry. Capture those moments.
  14. 14. Backstage at the musical. Photography Advice #2 Try to find unusual shots. Sidelines at the game. What’s going on behind the scenes? Looking at his diploma for the first time.
  15. 15. SPORTS: try to picture every player at least once. You might need to follow a player with your lens while you wait for several good shots of him or her. And even though there are six shots of this guy…not one of them is a GREAT basketball action shot. Keep shooting!
  16. 16. SPORTS: Close-ups are usually better than long shots.
  17. 17. SPORTS: Close-ups are usually better than long shots. Too far away. Can’t even really tell which team is Heyworth!
  18. 18. SPORTS: Close-ups are usually better than long shots.
  19. 19. More Sports Advice 1 . I F Y O U C A N . . . G E T T H E B A L L I N T H E S H O T. 2. DURING TIME-OUTS, LOOK FOR I N T E R E S T I N G S I D E - L I N E S H O T S : P L AY E R S , C O A C H E S , C H E E R L E A D E R S , FA N S , B A N D , ETC. 3. IF YOU ARE GOING FOR A FULL -BODY PIC, DON’T CUT OFF THE HANDS AND/OR FEET!
  20. 20. Even MORE Sports Advice 1 . TA K E A P I C T U R E O F T H E S C O R E B O A R D AT T H E END. 2 . I F Y O U A R E R E A L LY W I T H I T, TA K E A P H O TO O F A P I E C E O F PA P E R W I T H T H E D AT E / E V E N T WRITTEN ON IT! 3 . Y O U N E E D TO G O TO AT L E A S T 3 G A M E S TO G E T A VA R I E T Y O F S H O T S , P L AY E R S , A N D OPPONENTS. 4 . S H O O T F R O M T H E V I S I TO R ’ S S I D E S O M E T I M E S S O T H AT T H E H O R N E T FA N S A R E I N T H E BACKGROUND.
  21. 21. SPORTS: Close-ups are usually better than long shots.
  22. 22. Rule of Thirds Definition: The Rule of Thirds says that an image should be imagined as divided into nine equal parts by two equally-spaced horizontal lines and two equally-spaced vertical lines, and that important elements should be placed along these lines or their intersections. People who use this technique say that aligning a subject with these points creates more tension, energy, and interest in the picture. Centering everything is BORING!!!
  23. 23. Rule of Thirds You can put the “main object” on the left, right or even upper or lower third. Horses in upper third.
  24. 24. Rule of Thirds Boys in the left third AND the right third. Cool. Just remember: DON’T CENTER EVERYTHING!!! Centering is boring.s Bird in the lower third…and the left third.
  25. 25. And Two More Things… 1. ARRIVE EARLY TO LOOK FOR GOOD PLACES TO STAND. BE PREPARED TO MOVE AROUND FOR DIFFERENT ANGLES. 2. ARRIVE EARLY SO THAT YOU CAN CHECK YOUR CAMERA SETTINGS AND FIX ANY PROBLEMS.
  26. 26. Preparing for a Photography Assignment Put the battery in the charger ahead of time!!! Check the batteries and be sure you are carrying a spare set. There is NOTHING worse than having your camera die! Lithium batteries last longer in cameras.
  27. 27. Preparing for a Photography Assignment Make sure the memory card is actually IN THE CAMERA!!! Don’t Assume! You’ll look like an idiot if it’s missing… trust me, I know.
  28. 28. Preparing for a Photography Assignment Talk to the person in charge to make sure you are OK to take pictures, and from where.
  29. 29. Last Words TAKE LOADS! You simply cannot take too many pictures. The more you take, the more we have to choose from. And you just might capture that perfect shot.
  30. 30. The Last, Last Word BE SURE TO DOWNLOAD YOUR PHOTOS FROM THE CAMERA INTO THE RIGHT PLACE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE! GET THEM OFF THE CAMERA TO FREE UP SPACE. LABEL THEM WHILE YOU STILL REMEMBER WHAT’S GOING ON.

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