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Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010
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Classroom video in pre-service teacher training TESOL 2010

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Presentation at TESOL 2010

Presentation at TESOL 2010

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  • I thought we could open with “Why use video?” in order to frame the presentation, and then could give the details of what we do (the video data and the classroom applications)
  • Feel free to reword or add to some of this! I’m thinking orally we can point out (1) video provides many students (especially those with no teaching experience) with a chance to see what an ESL classroom can be like [we could work in your point from another slide: “Our usual experience is with scripted, rehearsed, filmed and edited video”; (2) In classroom observations pre-service teachers focus on the teacher, and it is takes experience and guidance for pre-service teachers to see students, their orientation to the pedagogical design and evidence of learning (3) allows us to contextualize the readings students do in intro to methods type classes; and (4) helps us break students of the habit of negatively evaluating teacher actions.
  • The video that we used came from the Lab school
  • Video from the lab school is compiled in the multimedia adult English learner corpus Adult ESOL Lab School at Portland State University large corpus of video-recorded classroom interaction recorded 2001-2005 (4000 hours) adult learners of English, local community college integrated-skills classes collaboration between local university and local community college satellite site for ESL classes at the university setting almost 700 students participated in the lab school during those 4 years
  • We teach in programs for pre-service and in-service teachers with a variety of professional goals and experiences One of the struggles in pre-service teacher training is helping our trainees learn to see what is going on when they are in the classroom doing observations as part of their TESOL training. We’ve read observation reports written by our trainee students about what they see and have come to understand that they can describe a classroom in only a very general way. It limits what they can learn from doing observations. In addition, we’ve talked with teachers who are being observed and have had conversations with their observers and report that the class (just viewed) had an activity that “bombed” but in the conversation, it became clear that the observer didn’t recognize it. We have worked together to determine some ways to use video in these contexts.
  • Today we’ll be talking about three areas of focus in which we’ve used video from the lab school Classroom observation Lesson plan design To understand student participation in classroom tasks In each of the focus areas we’ve been able to use shared viewing and repeated viewing in ways that are not possible in real-time observation nor in scripted “model” classrooms
  • We’ve used video in many different ways since we began the lab school project one of the things that we’ve experienced REPEATEDLY is that when students (or professionals for that matter) see the video, they immediately start to criticize the teacher even though they have no knowledge of what the class has done in the moments and weeks before the video, they don’t know the students, the teacher nor the course goals plus, they are pre-service teachers without a lot of experience in classrooms In short, they don’t have justification to be critical it may be a function of our experience with video in other contexts Regardless, we wanted to be able to help students see past their criticisms to what is in the video, to be able to describe what they were seeing and to learn from it. In our experience, once students move past the evaluation and stay in the description, they see many different things that the ESOL students are doing. For example, one of my groups of TESOL students identified 20 different strategies that the ESOL students were using in the clip to try to establish joint understanding. e.g. negotiation, asking friends, asking the teacher, writing it down, using L1 (Chinese and Spanish), electronic dictionaries
  • Watch the clip once with the focal question “What did I see?” Individual free-write, 5 minutes Whole class discussion View clip again “What new things did I see?” Pair discussion Whole group discussion of description, reframe all evaluation into description**can do in a powerful but sneaky way or in a more gentle way Homework: assign each student a topic to focus on for individual media viewing This is a view of students that teacher trainees don’t usually get **Watch video** at 17:08 Cam reaches for an electronic dictionary In this clip, the teacher has asked the student to “tell your partner what you did this weekend.” They do this every week and the teacher encourages them to try to do it themselves. http://www.labschool.pdx.edu/Viewer/viewer.php?Methods%20clips%201%20pairs
  • Topics Topic 1: Are the students engaged in the activity / interaction? What evidence can you see or hear that makes you think that? Topic 2: What is the teacher doing? What was the task / activity? How did the teacher set up the activity? Topic 3: What are the students doing (talking, reading, listening, writing, …)? What materials are the students using? Topic 4: What are the problems that students encounter? What strategies / resources do the students use to resolve it?
  • One week later, students have each focused on one area Jigsaw Activity 15 minutes—get into groups that all have the SAME topic questions Share your descriptions (what you saw) 15 minutes—get into groups of 1 person per topic question (groups of 4 people) Each share your description, based on your topic questions 15 minutes—whole class Each group share one or two of the things that you discussed Opportunity to ask questions Homework: A two-page synthesis of your insights gained from repeated observations, individual reflections, and classroom discussions At this point, the observations are rich. Each student has learned how to “see” the student interaction and negotiation and has begun their ability to put aside their immediate evaluation so that they can see what is happening in the classroom
  • Orally: Explain how hard it is for Ss to understand Brown’s discussion of goals/terminal objectives/enabling objectives-- How can you explain this without seeing an actual lesson? It is often easier for Ss to start by identifying activities/procedures-- they can articulate these. Shared viewing & discussion allows them to talk through _why_ a teacher might have chosen to do certain activities. Seeing student responses is also important. When writing lesson plans in isolation, Ss tend to forget about how their students might respond-- what questions they might have, how comfortable/uncomfortable they might feel doing certain things, but seeing the students in the video keeps student needs/preferences at the forefront, and encourages them to anticipate difficulties.
  • I could use the warm-up clip to show how this works.
  • I could use the warm-up clip to show how this works.
  • Explain how Ss take notes on the template. Show video clip after this slide.
  • Explain how Ss take notes on the template. Show video clip after this slide.
  • Explain that procedures come first-- what did you see the teacher do? The students? Brainstorm on board, later type up in this format.
  • After procedures are mapped out, we brainstorm what we think the purpose behind the activity is.
  • I can provide a copy of the fully typed lesson plan, and talk through how we make connections between each separate activity and the goals of the lesson.
  • I can provide a copy of the fully typed lesson plan, and talk through how we make connections between each separate activity and the goals of the lesson.
  • Kumaravadivelu, B. (2003). Chapter 5: Facilitation negotiated interaction. In Beyond Methods: Macrostrategies for Language Teaching . New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Purpose To focus on students in a way that is difficult in classrooms**teacher presence always alters the interaction To view video repeatedly, which allows for analysis of student language **in more depth than is usually possible To connect classroom language to potential second language acquisition **negotiation for form, meaning, discuss what role that may play in second language acquisition To see that student pairs enact the same activity somewhat differently **each pair focused on a little bit different aspect in their negotiations To identify students as agents in their own learning **it is the students whose needs & goals drove the differences in focus of their negotiations
  • Procedures Introduce the value of pair activities and student interaction Watch video clip on Chyou and Domingo -excited Watch again, but with transcript in hand It is important to first SEE the student interaction first, use gesture, facial expressions, etc. then the transcript can be used to look at the language Teacher model the activity by describing what she saw, answer these questions: What kind of interactions did the students have? What was the focus of their negotiation? What strategies did they use? What learning may have taken place? Discuss as a class Watch the first clip Lowest level in the program http://www.labschool.pdx.edu/Viewer/viewer.php?pair_interaction
  • In the second clip, a 2 nd pair of ESL students are doing the same exact activity at the same exact time This time the teacher trainees do the activity themselves they watch the clip, once without transcript, once with they discuss the answers to the same questions they have a large group discussion
  • Procedures Last, show two more clips of two student pairs doing the same activity Chyou and Domingo-nervous Jin and Zoya-nervous The students go through the same process this time focus on the ways in which the two pairs enact the pair activity in similar ways different waysA My answer: The focus was slightly different for each The strategies used were slightly different both were doing the activity as designed Large group discussion **I didn’t actually do this part but I will when I do this activity again in a month Homework: write up the answers to the questions, may view video at home in this way the students have encountered the information in increasing independent ways—they are now ready to go through the process and review it, writing it up
  • Why we use video (revisit) From slide #3 To provide pre-service teachers with opportunities to view “live” ESL classroom interaction. To allow discussions of TESOL theory, research, and methodology to be situated within actual teaching and learning contexts. To help pre-service teachers see students in classrooms, rather than just teachers. To help students develop the ability to describe and interpret, rather than simply evaluate, what they see in the classroom. As we’ve used video with our students we reflect on how this has helped us to see teacher training in a different way just as our students see classrooms in a different way. using video in teacher training has changed how we “see” teaching and learning in our own classrooms as well as in ESOL classrooms Relationship between teaching and learning -- not just what teachers design, but also what students bring to the classroom
  • Add references: TQ piece FOB Jen’s thesis
  • Transcript

    • 1. Classroom video in pre-service teacher training <ul><li>Kathy Harris </li></ul><ul><li>Casey Keck </li></ul>
    • 2. Overview of our presentation <ul><li>Why use classroom video in teacher training? </li></ul><ul><li>Multimedia Adult English Learner Corpus </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher training applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Classroom observation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lesson plan design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding student participation in classroom tasks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Conclusion and next steps </li></ul>
    • 3. Why classroom video? <ul><li>To provide pre-service teachers with opportunities to view “live” ESL classroom interaction. </li></ul><ul><li>To allow discussions of TESOL theory, research, and methodology to be situated within actual teaching and learning contexts. </li></ul><ul><li>To help pre-service teachers see students in classrooms, rather than just teachers. </li></ul><ul><li>To help students develop the ability to describe and interpret, rather than simply evaluate, what they see in the classroom. </li></ul>
    • 4. The Lab School: A National Labsite for Adult ESOL Grant R309B6002 from the Institute for Education Science, U.S. Dept. of Education, to the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy
    • 5. Multimedia Adult English Learner Corpus (MAELC) <ul><li>Adult ESOL Lab School at Portland State University </li></ul><ul><li>large corpus of video-recorded classroom interaction recorded 2001-2005 (4000 hours) </li></ul><ul><li>adult learners of English, local community college integrated-skills classes </li></ul><ul><li>collaboration between local university and local community college </li></ul><ul><ul><li>satellite site for ESL classes at the university setting </li></ul></ul><ul><li>almost 700 students participated in the lab school during those 4 years </li></ul>
    • 6. Our experience with video <ul><li>PSU & SFSU MA TESL Programs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-service & In-service teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Variety of professional goals and experiences </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Collaborative design of teacher-training activities that involve repeated, shared viewing of ESL classroom video data. </li></ul>
    • 7. Three areas of focus: <ul><ul><li>Classroom observation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lesson plan design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding student participation in classroom tasks </li></ul></ul>
    • 8. Classroom Observation: Learning how to “see” classrooms <ul><li>Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>To provide an opportunity for pre-service teachers to watch ESOL students through repeated, shared viewing </li></ul><ul><li>To help pre-service teachers identify when they are being evaluative and help them move toward description </li></ul><ul><li>To help pre-service ESOL teachers identify the strategies that the students are using to make meaning </li></ul>
    • 9. Classroom observation assignment Procedures, Session 1 <ul><li>Watch the clip once with the focal question “What did I see?” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual free-write, 5 minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Whole class discussion </li></ul></ul><ul><li>View clip again “What new things did I see?” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pair discussion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Whole group discussion of description, reframe all evaluation into description </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Homework: assign each student a topic to focus on for individual media viewing </li></ul>
    • 10. Classroom observation assignment Topics <ul><li>Topic 1: Engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Topic 2: Teacher </li></ul><ul><li>Topic 3: Students </li></ul><ul><li>Topic 4: Problems/strategies </li></ul>
    • 11. Classroom observation assignment Procedures, Session 2 <ul><li>Jigsaw Activity </li></ul><ul><li>15 minutes—get into groups that all have the SAME topic questions </li></ul><ul><li>Share your descriptions (what you saw) </li></ul><ul><li>15 minutes—get into groups of 1 person per topic question (groups of 4 people) </li></ul><ul><li>Each share your description, based on your topic questions </li></ul><ul><li>15 minutes—whole class </li></ul><ul><li>Each group share one or two of the things that you discussed </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity to ask questions </li></ul><ul><li>Homework: A two-page synthesis of your insights gained from repeated observations, individual reflections, and classroom discussions </li></ul>
    • 12. Lesson plan design Purpose <ul><li>To help students to identify the major components of a lesson as it unfolds. </li></ul><ul><li>To help students understand how lesson components work together to accomplish lesson goals & objectives. </li></ul><ul><li>To raise students’ awareness of considering student needs, experiences, and engagement when making lesson plan design choices. </li></ul>
    • 13. Lesson plan design Procedures <ul><li>Brief discussion of course reading on lesson plan design - What questions do you have? </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to the teaching context of the classroom video </li></ul><ul><li>Video viewing - one component at a time </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Warm-up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First activity (whole class) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Second activity (pair work) </li></ul></ul>
    • 14. Lesson plan design Procedures <ul><li>Students watch one component and take notes on the procedures. </li></ul><ul><li>As a class, we discuss what we saw and write procedures on the board, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of the board, overhead, handouts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Techniques for giving instructions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time devoted to the activity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>We then discuss what we think is the purpose behind the activity. </li></ul>
    • 15. Lesson plan design Procedures <ul><li>Lesson Plan Template </li></ul><ul><li>Overall goal(s) of lesson: </li></ul><ul><li>Terminal lesson objectives: </li></ul><ul><li>Enabling objectives: </li></ul><ul><li>Materials and Equipment: </li></ul>
    • 16. Lesson plan design Procedures <ul><li>Lesson Plan Template </li></ul><ul><li>Warm-up Activity: (start & end time) </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Procedures: </li></ul><ul><li>Activity 1: (start & end time) </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Procedures: </li></ul>
    • 17. Lesson plan design Procedures <ul><li>Context for the video clips </li></ul><ul><li>Beginner/High Beginner Community College ESL </li></ul><ul><li>One month into the semester </li></ul><ul><li>Lesson focus: How often do you _________? Questions and responses </li></ul>
    • 18. Lesson plan design Procedures <ul><li>Example notes </li></ul><ul><li>Activity 1: Textbook activity, whole class (15 min) </li></ul><ul><li>Procedures: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show the “How often do you” activity on the overhead. Make sure Ss have their books open to this activity. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show Ss that they will start each question with “How often do you” and then will finish the question by saying what is shown in the picture. For example, if the picture shows people dancing, they will say “How often do you go dancing?” </li></ul></ul>
    • 19. Lesson plan design Procedures <ul><li>Example notes </li></ul><ul><li>Activity 1: Textbook activity, whole class (15 min) </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To model how to do the “How often do you” activity, so that students can eventually work together in pairs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To give Ss more opportunities to both ask and respond to “how often” questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To give students my feedback on their use of “how often” questions and responses </li></ul></ul>
    • 20. Lesson plan design Procedures <ul><li>Example notes </li></ul><ul><li>Overall Goal: To review and provide extensive practice with“How often do you” questions and responses </li></ul><ul><li>Terminal lesson objective: Students will be able to both ask and respond to a variety of “how often do you” questions. </li></ul>
    • 21. Lesson plan design Procedures <ul><li>Example notes </li></ul><ul><li>Enabling objectives: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students will hear, and have opportunities to produce, several examples of “How often do you” questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students will hear, and have opportunities to produce, a common set of “how often” responses. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students will receive feedback from the teacher on their use of “how often” questions and responses. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students will receive feedback from their classmates on their use of “how often” questions and responses. </li></ul></ul>
    • 22. Understanding student participation in classroom tasks <ul><li>Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>To focus on students in a way that is difficult in classrooms </li></ul><ul><li>To view video repeatedly, which allows for analysis of student language </li></ul><ul><li>To connect classroom language to potential second language acquisition </li></ul><ul><li>To see that student pairs enact the same activity somewhat differently </li></ul><ul><li>To identify students as agents in their own learning </li></ul>
    • 23. Understanding student participation in classroom tasks <ul><li>Procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Introduce the value of pair activities and student interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Watch video clip on Chyou and Domingo -excited </li></ul><ul><li>Watch again, but with transcript in hand </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher model the activity by describing what she saw, answer these questions: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What kind of interactions did the students have? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What was the focus of their negotiation? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What strategies did they use? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What learning may have taken place? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Discuss as a class </li></ul>
    • 24. Understanding student participation in classroom tasks <ul><li>Procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Watch the second clip on Jin and Zoya- excited </li></ul><ul><li>Watch again, transcript in hand </li></ul><ul><li>In small groups the students describe what they saw, answering the same questions </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss in the large group </li></ul>
    • 25. Understanding student participation in classroom tasks <ul><li>Procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Last, show two more clips of two student pairs doing the same activity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chyou and Domingo- nervous </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jin and Zoya- nervous </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The students go through the same process </li></ul><ul><li>this time focus on the ways in which </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the two pairs enact the pair activity in similar ways </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>different ways </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Large group discussion </li></ul><ul><li>Homework: write up the answers to the questions, may view video at home </li></ul>
    • 26. Why use classroom video? <ul><li>Using classroom video has helped our teacher trainees to see language students, not just teachers. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In the classroom </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When designing lessons and curricula </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Using classroom video has also helped us to see teacher training in a new way. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When explaining concepts, theories, methodologies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When carrying out teacher-training activities </li></ul></ul>
    • 27. Thank you for your time today <ul><li>Kathy Harris </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Casey Keck </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>For links to our teaching materials, links to video clips, and our references, go to: http://classroomvideoharriskeck.pbworks.com
    • 28. References <ul><li>Garland, J. N. (2002). Co-Construction of language and activity in low-level ESL Pair interactions. Unpublished MA Thesis, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon. </li></ul><ul><li>Harris, K. A. (2005). Same activity, different focus. Focus On Basics: Connecting Research and Practice, 8 (A). http:// www.labschool.pdx.edu/Viewer/viewer.php?pair_interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Kumaravadivelu, B. (2003). Chapter 5: Facilitation negotiated interaction. In Beyond Methods: Macrostrategies for Language Teaching . New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Reder, S., Harris, K., & Setzler, K. (2003). The Multimedia Adult ESL Learner Corpus. TESOL Quarterly, 37 (3), 546-557. www.labschool.pdx.edu </li></ul>

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