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Bsi leadership for student success what matters_most_2010
 

Bsi leadership for student success what matters_most_2010

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  • Nearly a third (32%) of entering students report that they turned in at least one assignment late, 25% say they failed to turn in one or more assignments, 47% report that they came to class unprepared, 29% say that they skipped class, and 10% report skipping class multiple times — all during the first three weeks of their first academic term. If these negative behaviors are not addressed, they too often become habits.
  • And, among developmental students the number is higher with more than 47% of entering students reporting that no one counseled them about their outside commitments.
  • The Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (CCFSSE) , which is aligned with CCSSE , elicits information from faculty about their teaching practices, the ways they spend time both in and out of class, and their perceptions regarding students’ educational experiences. CCFSSE now is in its second year, and this year, all CCFSSE analyses use a two-year cohort of participating colleges. This year’s cohort — called the 2006 CCFSSE Cohort — includes all colleges that participated in CCFSSE in 2005 and 2006 (each college’s most recent year of participation). Next year, CCFSSE results will be reported in terms of a three-year cohort and will include faculty survey data from 2005 through 2007.
  • Like CCSSE results, CCFSSE responses can help a college recognize its strengths, identify issues of concern, and zero in on areas of focus for faculty development. Many colleges compare faculty perceptions with student responses. While this exercise can lead to productive conversations, it is important to note that these comparisons are not always equivalent. Students report their experiences throughout the current academic year, while faculty members are asked to describe their practices in a specific, randomly selected course and also to indicate their perceptions of student experiences in the college more generally. Nonetheless, the student and faculty responses provide a useful starting point for discussion, particularly where faculty and students have differing perceptions. Overall, faculty members perceive higher levels of student engagement than students report. This difference is not unexpected. In part, it shows the difference between personal data (what each person personally observes and experiences) and systematically collected data, which show what typically is happening to students on campus. For example, an instructor may work closely with the students who participate in a particular campus student organization. That faculty member personally experiences a high level of student-faculty interaction, but he or she is interacting with only a small percentage of the college’s students.
  • Like CCSSE results, CCFSSE responses can help a college recognize its strengths, identify issues of concern, and zero in on areas of focus for faculty development. Many colleges compare faculty perceptions with student responses. While this exercise can lead to productive conversations, it is important to note that these comparisons are not always equivalent. Students report their experiences throughout the current academic year, while faculty members are asked to describe their practices in a specific, randomly selected course and also to indicate their perceptions of student experiences in the college more generally. Nonetheless, the student and faculty responses provide a useful starting point for discussion, particularly where faculty and students have differing perceptions. Overall, faculty members perceive higher levels of student engagement than students report. This difference is not unexpected. In part, it shows the difference between personal data (what each person personally observes and experiences) and systematically collected data, which show what typically is happening to students on campus. For example, an instructor may work closely with the students who participate in a particular campus student organization. That faculty member personally experiences a high level of student-faculty interaction, but he or she is interacting with only a small percentage of the college’s students.

Bsi leadership for student success what matters_most_2010 Bsi leadership for student success what matters_most_2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Leadership for Student Success: WHAT MATTERS MOST Basic Skills Initiative Leadership Institute, 2010
  • Eastfield College WHAT ARE YOU LEADING FOR?
  • Eastfield College WHAT WE’RE LEARNING ABOUT WHAT MATTERS MOST
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • #1 Engagement matters
    • … for community college students
    BSILI 2010
  • Emphasis on Student Engagement
    • 20 Years of Research on Undergraduate Student Learning, Persistence and Success
    • 3 Years of Important Research on Students in Community and Technical Colleges
    BSILI 2010
  • Engagement Matters – furthermore…
    • In community colleges, engagement is unlikely to happen by accident.
    • It has to happen by design.
    BSILI 2010
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • #2 We must engage students early and often.
    • Thus…
    • … the Survey of Entering Student Engagement (SENSE)
    BSILI 2010
  • Support for Learners
    • Most
    • Important
    • Service?
    BSILI 2010
  • Support for Learners: Most Important Service?
    • National: very or somewhat important
    • 90% Academic Planning and Advising
    • 85% Computer Labs
    • 79% Career Counseling
    • 78% Financial Aid
    BSILI 2010
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • In focus groups with students, what do they typically report as the most important factor in keeping them in school, persisting toward their goals?
    • #3 Relationships matter
    • “ The compensatory effect”
    • i.e., where there are differences in engagement between “high-risk” groups and their comparison groups (academically under-prepared students, students of color, first generation students, nontraditional college age students) --- the high-risk students are more engaged.
    BSILI 2010
  • Relationships: Active and Collaborative Learning
    • Worked with other students on projects during class:
    • National (2008):
    • 47% often or very often (13% never)
    BSILI 2010
  • Relationships: Active and Collaborative Learning
    • Worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments:
    • National:
    • 21% often or very often (41% never )
    BSILI 2010
  • Relationships: Student-Faculty Interaction
    • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with instructors outside of class:
    • National:
    • 16% often or very often
    • 47% never
    BSILI 2010
  • Eastfield College ENGAGED LEARNING
  • ENGAGED LEARNING
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • #4 High (and clear) expectations matter…
    • … As does frequent feedback on students’ academic performance.
    • “ The compensatory effect”
    • i.e., where there are differences in engagement between “high-risk” groups and their comparison groups (academically under-prepared students, students of color, first generation students, nontraditional college age students) --- the high-risk students are more engaged.
    BSILI 2010
  • Eastfield College HIGH EXPECTATIONS AND ASPIRATIONS
  • High Expectations and Aspirations
    • Percent of entering students who strongly or somewhat agree that they have the motivation to do what it takes to succeed in college:
    • 90%
    • Percent of entering students who strongly or somewhat agree that they are prepared academically to succeed in college:
    • 84%
  • Percentage of students who, at least once during their first three weeks of college: High Expectations and Aspirations
  • Academic Challenge
    • Full-time students who wrote 4 or fewer papers or reports of any length during the academic year:
    • National: 30%
    BSILI 2010
  • Eastfield College MOST IMPORTANT SERVICE?
  • A Plan and a Pathway
  • A PLAN AND A PATHWAY An advisor helped identify the courses I needed to take during my first semester/quarter (69% Agree or Strongly Agree)
  • A PLAN AND A PATHWAY An advisor helped me to set academic goals and to create a plan for achieving them (31% Agree or Strongly Agree)
  • A Plan and A Pathway
  • A PLAN AND A PATHWAY A college staff member talked with me about my commitments outside of school to help me figure out the number of courses to take (22% Agree or Strongly Agree – 58% Disagree or Strongly Disagree)
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • #5 Effective Developmental/ Basic Skills Education Matters Hugely
    • Data points
    • Academic policy and support services
    • How we teach
    • ->-> Effective practice
    • State policy matters
    • “ The compensatory effect”
    • i.e., where there are differences in engagement between “high-risk” groups and their comparison groups (academically under-prepared students, students of color, first generation students, nontraditional college age students) --- the high-risk students are more engaged.
    BSILI 2010
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • # 6 Focused , sustained efforts, targeted to significant numbers of students, can produce real improvements in student engagement, learning, persistence, and academic attainment.
    • “ The compensatory effect”
    • i.e., where there are differences in engagement between “high-risk” groups and their comparison groups (academically under-prepared students, students of color, first generation students, nontraditional college age students) --- the high-risk students are more engaged.
    BSILI 2010
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • #7 Student Success By Design
    • Richland College/San Antonio
    • Houston Community College
    • Kingsborough Community College
    • Valencia Community College
    • All Florida Community Colleges
    • “ The compensatory effect”
    • i.e., where there are differences in engagement between “high-risk” groups and their comparison groups (academically under-prepared students, students of color, first generation students, nontraditional college age students) --- the high-risk students are more engaged.
    BSILI 2010
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • #8 Building a Culture of Inquiry and Evidence
    • “ Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There’s no better rule.”
    • — Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) Great Expectations
    • “ The compensatory effect”
    • i.e., where there are differences in engagement between “high-risk” groups and their comparison groups (academically under-prepared students, students of color, first generation students, nontraditional college age students) --- the high-risk students are more engaged.
    BSILI 2010
  • Student Progress and Success in the Community Colleges
    • What’s the denominator? Who is being counted, and when does the counting start? ALL? FIRST-TIME FULL-TIME? DEGREE-SEEKING? COLLEGE-READY? XX CREDIT HOURS EARNED?
    • What are the key performance measures at THIS college? How are you doing?
    • Is the “choice to complete” or the “failure to complete” equitably distributed across groups of students?
    What You should Ask about Success Rates
  • The Courage to See… BSILI 2010
  • Eastfield College FACULTY SURVEY FINDINGS
  • CCFSSE Findings
    • CCFSSE :
      • Elicits information from faculty about their teaching practices, the ways they spend their professional time both in and out of class, and their perceptions regarding students’ educational experiences
      • Is aligned with CCSSE to allow colleges to contrast student and faculty perceptions
    BSILI 2010
    • CCFSSE data are based on results from all colleges in the 2007 CCFSSE Cohort. When student (CCSSE) and faculty (CCFSSE) views are shown side-by-side in this presentation, the student responses include data only from colleges that participated in the faculty survey. It also is important to note that while CCSSE results are expressed in terms of benchmarks, which are created through a complex statistical analysis and peer review, there are no benchmarks for CCFSSE. For this presentation, CCFSSE results are presented in groupings of survey items that correspond to the CCSSE benchmarks.
    BSILI 2010 Source: 2009 CCSSE and CCFSSE Cohort data. A Tale of Two Perspectives Effective Educational Practices: Student and Faculty Responses
    • Faculty giving prompt feedback:
    • 93% often/very often
    • Students receiving prompt feedback:
    • 53% often/very often
    BSILI 2010 Source: 2009 CCSSE and CCFSSE Cohort data. A Tale of Two Perspectives Effective Educational Practices: Student and Faculty Responses
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • #9 Getting Beyond Projects
    • “ The compensatory effect”
    • i.e., where there are differences in engagement between “high-risk” groups and their comparison groups (academically under-prepared students, students of color, first generation students, nontraditional college age students) --- the high-risk students are more engaged.
    BSILI 2010
  • WHAT MATTERS MOST
    • #10
    • Resisting the Average/
    • Reaching for Excellence
    • “ The compensatory effect”
    • i.e., where there are differences in engagement between “high-risk” groups and their comparison groups (academically under-prepared students, students of color, first generation students, nontraditional college age students) --- the high-risk students are more engaged.
    BSILI 2010
  • Eastfield College Kay McClenney, Ph. D. Director, Center for Community College Student Engagement [email_address]