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Protein

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GCSE food technology

GCSE food technology


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Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Why do we need Protein?
    • Protein is used by our bodies for growth and repair.
    • Our bodies will use protein as an energy source if there is nothing else to use.
  • 3. What’s in a Protein?
      • Protein molecules are long chains of
      • AMINO ACIDS
      • There are two different types of
      • amino acids.
  • 4. Essential Amino Acids
    • We can only get these by eating them in our food. We cannot make them in our bodies. There are eight essential amino acids.
      • Non - Essential Amino Acids
    These can be made in the body.
  • 5.
    • Meat and Fish have a
    • High biological
    • value
    • This means that they contain all
    • the amino acids your body
    • needs to make the proteins it
    • requires.
  • 6. Who may have to choose their foods carefully to get all their high biological value proteins?
    • Vegetables do not usually contain all the necessary amino acids (low biological value). Vegetarians and Vegans must eat a wide variety of foods (e.g. plant proteins, beans and pulses) to make sure they are getting all the amino acids.
  • 7. How much is enough?
    • E stimated A verage R equirement
    • EAR (protein) = 0.6 X Body Mass (kg)
    • Eg A woman who weighs 60kg would need
    • 0.6 x 60 = 36g of Protein a day.
  • 8. Serving Size
    • You should eat two to three servings of protein every day from both plant and animal sources. Here are some examples of one serving (about the size of a standard pack of playing cards):
    • 100g boneless meat (eg lean beef, lamb or pork)
    • 100g boneless poultry (eg chicken or turkey breast)
    • 100g fish (eg salmon, sardines or tuna)
    • 2 medium eggs
    • 3 tablespoons of seeds (eg sunflower or pumpkin seeds)
    • 3 tablespoons of nuts (eg almonds or walnuts)
  • 9. Meat Analogue
    • Some people choose not to eat meat for a variety of reasons and obtain all their protein from other sources. In recent years manufacturers have produced many meat-like products, called ‘meat analogues’, which mimic the sensory properties of meat and can be used to replace meat.
    • Why might people choose not to have meat??!
  • 10. Examples
    • TVP – textured vegetable protein made from soya bean
    • Quorn – mycoprotein which is related to the mushroom
    • Tivall – wheat and vegetable protein , it has a texture similar to meat
    • Tofu and bean curd – soya bean
    • Meat analogues are often:
    • Enriched with vitamins and minerals
    • Low in fat
    • Have a similar nutritional value to meat
  • 11. Advantages vs Disadvantages
    • Advantages:
        • they are versatile
        • they are easy to store
        • they are cheap
    • Disadvantages:
        • they can be bland
        • they can be colourless
        • they can be quite dry
  • 12. Types of non meat eaters Plant based products Any animal product Vegan Eggs, milk, cheese, butter, cream, yoghurt Meat, fish, poultry, Lacto-ovo vegetarian Milk, cheese, butter, cream, yoghurt Meat, fish, poultry, eggs Lacto vegetarian Will eat: Will not eat:
  • 13. Key terms
    • Amino acids : smallest unit of a protein
    • Essential amino acids : can not be made by the body
    • HBV : contain essential amino acids
    • LBV : do not contain essential amino acids
    • Alternative protein foods: foods used instead of meat
    • Meat analogues: foods that are used in a similar way as meat
  • 14. Homework for
    • 1. What are the differences between meat and meat analogues? (5 marks)
    • -nutritional info
    • -taste, texture, aroma, appearance (discuss what you did in the lesson)
    • -cost
    • -ease of purchase, availability
    • 2. How can you recognise a meat analogue product? (2 marks)
    • -symbols –look them up on the internet or on packaging
    • 3. What meat analogue products are available? (3 marks)
    • -list of products, cost, where available
    • 4. Why might someone chose to become vegetarian or use meat analogue
    • products? (5 marks)
    • -religious reasons -meat scares
    • -health reasons -cost
    • Complete your own research using the internet or in a supermarkets to answer the majority of these questions