Lighting Design Basics      Based on the Book by Mark       Karlen and James Benya,         Wiley and Sons, 2004          ...
No Handouts?!?!?•Get the book  – www.wiley.com•Download this presentation at www.benyalighting.com•Questions? Send a messa...
What are lighting designbasics? 1.   Introduction 2.   Light Sources 3.   Luminaires 4.   Switching and Dimming 5.   Dayli...
What are lighting designbasics? 10. Residential Lighting Design 11. Office and Corporate Lighting     Design 12. Hospitali...
What are lighting designbasics? 16. The Professional Process of     Lighting Design 17. Collaborating with Lighting     De...
1 IntroductionA GOOD LIGHTING DESIGN SHOULD• Look good!• Provide the proper amount of light in every  room.• Be built and ...
2 Light Sources• Incandescent• Halogen• Fluorescent• Compact  Fluorescent Lamps• LED’s• Fiber Optic Sources               ...
Incandescent Lamps•Appealing•Warm, attractive color (2600-2900K)•Dimmable•Wide variety•Not energy efficient            ©20...
Low Voltage IncandescentLamps                                          PAR36 Long• Usually low                            ...
Halogen Lamps•Appealing                                 Halogen PAR 20, PAR 30•Crisp warm, attractive          and PAR 38 ...
Small halogen lamps for                                      task lights, sconces, etc. Low Voltage Halogen• Compact, brig...
Linear Fluorescent                            T-12   T-8   T-5   T-2•T-12 “fat tubes” no longer a good choice•Use T-8 lamp...
Compact Fluorescent•7,9, and 13 watt twin tubes (“PL” lamps) for step lights, low level lighting•Triple tube, Circuline an...
Color temperature                                       Range of                                       Daylight          W...
Recommended FluorescentLamps for Common UseDesired Lamp               Lamp Color  Color                      Designation• ...
Fluorescent Ballast Technology  •Non-dimming   electronic ballasts    – Quieter    – Instant starting  •Dimming   electron...
New Technologies         •Fiberoptics         •LED         ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Fiberoptics as Special Effect•End-emitting fiber  – twinkle effects (star    fields)  – in-water effects    (ponds and wat...
Fiberoptics as DisplayLighting• Uses special optical  elements (small lenses)• Each fiber emits a very small  amount of li...
LED Lights• Promising  technology• Used for traffic  signals and exit  signs• New products  include sconces,  step lights ...
For the Kitchen and BathMy favoritesKitchen                    Bath• PAR38 halogen            • Halogen or  work area     ...
Urban Living Trends•Smaller, higher quality spaces•Green design             ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Challenges of Green Design              • Too much emphasis on                compact fluorescent                lighting ...
For the Kitchen and BathMy green favoritesLook for US EPA Energy Star but be picky!Kitchen                    Bath• Compac...
3 Luminaires• “Architectural”   – Recessed cans   – Track   – Coves and undercabinet lights• Decorative   –   Chandeliers ...
Recessed Lighting• Generally inexpensive• Very popular• Aesthetically “neutral”• Good for task lighting• OK for general li...
Recessed Lighting• The “Housing”  – For most residential    use, fixtures are at    most about 7” tall for    2x8 construc...
Standard Housings      • Incandescent non-IC           • Incandescent IC  • Incandescent air tight IC        • Low voltage...
Remodeler Housings•Designed to fit through a single hole in the ceiling•Usually not IC             ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Premium Housings                   •Superior quality                   •Interchangeable                    lamp capability...
Choosing Trims• Is the trim suitable for your needs  – Adjustable?  – Right style?  – Right color or material?• Is the tri...
Standard trims• Downlight  – Baffle  – Cone• Accent light  – Gimbal  – Eyeball  – Pull down• Wallwash  – Eyelid           ...
Using StandardRecessed Lighting• Choose trims tastefully• Use halogen lamps   – 4” family use PAR20   – 5” and 6” family u...
AdjustableLine VoltageRecessedTrims  ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Low Voltage MR-16 Lighting• Typically used in a 3” or 4”  recessed can• Can be used (with the right  trim) in a 5” or 6” c...
Low Voltage Trims     ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Other Low Voltage Trims                     •Glass trim,                      gasketed for                      wet       ...
Be Careful with CompactFluorescent Downlights• Square: not IC or  AT but looks nice• Round IC – way  tall• To get an airti...
Track• Still used in museums for good reason• Permits maximum flexibility• Luminaires equipped easily with  spread lenses ...
Track• Standard 120 volt  track  – Low cost general    purpose  – High cost “museum    grade”• Low voltage track• Low volt...
Low VoltageLighting•Most recessed low voltage lights have a transformer in the housing•Most low voltage strips and some re...
Accent Lighting Using LowVoltage           ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Beam QualityAn unfiltered lamp tends  to have• Striation  – lines and harsh edges• Halation  – rings sometimes with    rai...
Taming the (MR16) Beast• Smooth the Beam  – Softening Lens (Halo    L111 or “solite”)  – Spread Lens  – Linear Lens• Shiel...
Accent Lighting Technique• Should be located at about  30 degrees off vertical  relative to focal point• Do not get too cl...
Accent Lighting                  Recessed accent light              Mounting Line             Track or monopoint          ...
Accent Lighting with PAR36                    For high ceilings use a low                    voltage 6” recessed luminaire...
Accent lighting          • Living room, great            room, family room          • Dining room          • Foyer        ...
The Layered Approach toLighting DesignBegin by thinking in layers                                  Decorative             ...
Layer #1 - The Ambient orGeneral Lighting Layer• Generally the relatively uniform lighting of the  space.• Tends to establ...
The Ambient Layer        Cove lighting          ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Layer #2 - The Task Layer•Generally limited to “task lighting” of the HORIZONTAL WORK SURFACE at work locations.•Tends to ...
Ambient and Task Lighting    Downlighting               ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Layer #3 - The Display orFocal Layer• Generally limited to accent lighting  and similar effects, primarily through  VERTIC...
Ambient, Task and FocalLighting                      Accent Lighting         ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Layer #4 - the Decorative orTraditional Layer• In general, adds the decorative  luminaires called for by the  architecture...
Ambient, Task, Focal andDecorative Lighting              Chandelier          ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Composition         ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Composition                        •Chandelier                         (ambient and                         decorative)   ...
Composition  •Cove (ambient)  •Recessed (task)  •Undercabinet   (task)  •Chandelier   (decorative)  •Sconce   (decorative)...
Composition and Planningfor Change                             •Recessed                              adjustable          ...
Remote transformers•Address Article 411 and 725 issues  – Class 1  – Class 2•Low noise, minimum heat              ©2005 JA...
WallwashingProduces a flat,even wash of lightfor a wall. You mayfind this is NOT whatyou wanted…                 ©2005 JAM...
Types of Wallwashers                                  Rececssed asymmetric styleEyelid styleRecessed lens style           ...
Principles of Wallwashing• Fixtures at least 24”  out from wall and  about 1/4 wall                                The hig...
UndercabinetLightingDON’T• Mount fixtures at  back of cabinet• Use luminous front  fixtures• Put short fixtures  under lon...
UndercabinetLightingDO• Use solid front fixtures• Use a lens to diffuse  the lamp image over  polished countertops• Choose...
Low Voltage SpecialtyLighting• Permits finely detailed lighting effects• Use inside and under cabinets and  similar locati...
Example: Bookcase        ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Example: Cabinet withPolished Countertop          ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Things to Remember: Roomby Room•Here is my basic list of lighting considerations•I use this with every client – we expand ...
Kitchen•Multiple layers permits multiple moods                ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Steps to Better Kitchen Lightingby LayersLayer #1 – Light  the Task               ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Steps to Better Kitchen Lightingby LayersLayer #2 – Ambient Light             ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Steps to Better Kitchen Lightingby LayersLayer #3 – Decorative Light              ©2005 JAMES BENYA
BathroomLayers•Multiple layers for mood and flexibility             ©2005 JAMES BENYA
BathroomLayer #1-TaskLight the Face             ©2005 JAMES BENYA
BathroomLayer #1-TaskLight the Face             ©2005 JAMES BENYA
BathroomLayer #2-TaskLight the Sink             ©2005 JAMES BENYA
BathroomLayer #3-TaskLight the  Shower or  Tub            ©2005 JAMES BENYA
BathroomLayer #4- Night Lights             ©2005 JAMES BENYA
Other Lighting Things toRemember• Dimmers and           • Controlled  controls laid out       daylight  well and kept     ...
Lighting Design BasicsPresented by BENYA LIGHTING           DESIGN  For a copy of these slides,   www.benyalighting.com   ...
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Energy Efficiency, Storage and Design

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Energy efficiency was given emphasize in this topic and its relation to environmental control system. Storage and design in energy signifies the importance to architecture especially in buildings and other structures.

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Transcript of "Energy Efficiency, Storage and Design "

  1. 1. Lighting Design Basics Based on the Book by Mark Karlen and James Benya, Wiley and Sons, 2004 Presented by NKBA and Benya Lighting James Robert Benya, PE, FIES, IALD, LC BENYA LIGHTING DESIGN Portland, OR©2005 JAMES BENYA
  2. 2. No Handouts?!?!?•Get the book – www.wiley.com•Download this presentation at www.benyalighting.com•Questions? Send a message to jbenya@benyalighting.com ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  3. 3. What are lighting designbasics? 1. Introduction 2. Light Sources 3. Luminaires 4. Switching and Dimming 5. Daylighting 6. Lighting Calculations 7. Documenting Lighting Design 8. The Layers Approach 9. A Basic Approach ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  4. 4. What are lighting designbasics? 10. Residential Lighting Design 11. Office and Corporate Lighting Design 12. Hospitality Lighting Design 13. Health Care/Institutional Lighting Design 14. Lighting for Stores 15. Lighting Common Spaces ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  5. 5. What are lighting designbasics? 16. The Professional Process of Lighting Design 17. Collaborating with Lighting Designers 18. Computers and Lighting Design 19. Developing Skills Beyond the Basics ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  6. 6. 1 IntroductionA GOOD LIGHTING DESIGN SHOULD• Look good!• Provide the proper amount of light in every room.• Be built and constructed within budget, code, and other constraints.• Be environmentally responsible.• Respond to the Architecture and Interior Design• Produce good color• Achieve the desired moods of each space• Be able to control the lights ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  7. 7. 2 Light Sources• Incandescent• Halogen• Fluorescent• Compact Fluorescent Lamps• LED’s• Fiber Optic Sources ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  8. 8. Incandescent Lamps•Appealing•Warm, attractive color (2600-2900K)•Dimmable•Wide variety•Not energy efficient ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  9. 9. Low Voltage IncandescentLamps PAR36 Long• Usually low throw display lamp 2700K wattage but not inherently energy efficient• Greatest Low advantage: size voltage strips and tubes 2400- 2600KXenon incandescent strip lights2800K ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  10. 10. Halogen Lamps•Appealing Halogen PAR 20, PAR 30•Crisp warm, attractive and PAR 38 lamps color (2800-3100K)•Dimmable•Wide variety•Longer life, slightly more energy efficient Halogen lamps for table lamps and chandeliers ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  11. 11. Small halogen lamps for task lights, sconces, etc. Low Voltage Halogen• Compact, bright lamps• A bit more energy efficient• Excellent reading, work PAR36 and and display light sources AR111 halogen• Color Temp: 2900-3100K long throw lamps• Long life MR16 ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  12. 12. Linear Fluorescent T-12 T-8 T-5 T-2•T-12 “fat tubes” no longer a good choice•Use T-8 lamps for most residential uses•Consider T-5 and T-2 lamps for undercabinet fixtures ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  13. 13. Compact Fluorescent•7,9, and 13 watt twin tubes (“PL” lamps) for step lights, low level lighting•Triple tube, Circuline and 2D lamps 18-58 watts for general lighting ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  14. 14. Color temperature Range of Daylight Warm Neutral Cool Cold 1800K 2800K 3500K 5000K 7500K 10000K 2200K 3000K 4100K 6500K 9000KSetting North Range ofSun Fluorescent Sky Range Range of of Incandescent Flame and Halogen ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  15. 15. Recommended FluorescentLamps for Common UseDesired Lamp Lamp Color Color Designation• Warm 2700K • “827”• Warm 3000K • “830” or “930”• Neutral 3500K • “835”• Cool 4100K • “841”• Cold 5000K • “850” or “950”Example: F32T8/830 is a 3000K, 32 watt tubularfluorescent lamp 8/8” in diameter ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  16. 16. Fluorescent Ballast Technology •Non-dimming electronic ballasts – Quieter – Instant starting •Dimming electronic ballasts – Two wire versions now available – Standard 3 wire and 4 wire versions also available ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  17. 17. New Technologies •Fiberoptics •LED ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  18. 18. Fiberoptics as Special Effect•End-emitting fiber – twinkle effects (star fields) – in-water effects (ponds and water features)•Side Emitting fiber – outlining – shapes ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  19. 19. Fiberoptics as DisplayLighting• Uses special optical elements (small lenses)• Each fiber emits a very small amount of light• Maximum bundle is about 300 cd at 30 degree• Virtually no UV or IR• Requires a low ambient light space like a fine museum ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  20. 20. LED Lights• Promising technology• Used for traffic signals and exit signs• New products include sconces, step lights and marker lights ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  21. 21. For the Kitchen and BathMy favoritesKitchen Bath• PAR38 halogen • Halogen or work area fluorescent vanity downlights lights• MR16 low voltage • MR16 vanity accent lights downlight and• Low voltage xenon accent lights or fluorescent • MR16 shower light undercabinet lights• Fluorescent cove lights ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  22. 22. Urban Living Trends•Smaller, higher quality spaces•Green design ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  23. 23. Challenges of Green Design • Too much emphasis on compact fluorescent lighting • Little understanding of lighting design by utility and energy efficiency advocates • Not many good choices of luminaires embodying green principles • Poor design sensitivity in the green community ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  24. 24. For the Kitchen and BathMy green favoritesLook for US EPA Energy Star but be picky!Kitchen Bath• Compact • Fluorescent vanity fluorescent work lights area downlights • MR16 vanity• MR16 low voltage downlight and accent lights accent lights• Low voltage • MR16 shower light fluorescent undercabinet lights• Fluorescent cove lights ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  25. 25. 3 Luminaires• “Architectural” – Recessed cans – Track – Coves and undercabinet lights• Decorative – Chandeliers – Sconces – Pendants – Lamps• Utility – Drums – Closet lights ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  26. 26. Recessed Lighting• Generally inexpensive• Very popular• Aesthetically “neutral”• Good for task lighting• OK for general lighting• If chosen correctly, excellent for display lighting and a number of special applications ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  27. 27. Recessed Lighting• The “Housing” – For most residential use, fixtures are at most about 7” tall for 2x8 construction• The “Trim” – 4”, 5” and 6” incandescent – 3”, 4”, 5” and 6” low voltage – 4”, 5” and 6” compact fluorescent ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  28. 28. Standard Housings • Incandescent non-IC • Incandescent IC • Incandescent air tight IC • Low voltage non-IC • Low voltage IC • Low voltage airtight IC• Compact fluorescent non- IC • Compact fluorescent IC • Compact fluorescent airtight IC ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  29. 29. Remodeler Housings•Designed to fit through a single hole in the ceiling•Usually not IC ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  30. 30. Premium Housings •Superior quality •Interchangeable lamp capability – Incandescent – Low voltage – Compact fluorescent •High quality interchangeable trims ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  31. 31. Choosing Trims• Is the trim suitable for your needs – Adjustable? – Right style? – Right color or material?• Is the trim LISTED for the application? – Kitchen: indoor, dry location – Bathroom: indoor, dry location – Over shower or tub: Spa or shower rated – Steam shower: wet label, gasketed – Indoor pool or hot tub: wet label, non conductive trim, at least 7.5’ above water level ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  32. 32. Standard trims• Downlight – Baffle – Cone• Accent light – Gimbal – Eyeball – Pull down• Wallwash – Eyelid ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  33. 33. Using StandardRecessed Lighting• Choose trims tastefully• Use halogen lamps – 4” family use PAR20 – 5” and 6” family use PAR30 – 6” family also consider the PAR38 – Avoid so called line voltage MR16 and PAR16 ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  34. 34. AdjustableLine VoltageRecessedTrims ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  35. 35. Low Voltage MR-16 Lighting• Typically used in a 3” or 4” recessed can• Can be used (with the right trim) in a 5” or 6” can• Use good quality MR16 lamps• ALWAYS use a soft focus spread lens (Halo L111)• Current Favorite: Sylvania 37MR16/IR ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  36. 36. Low Voltage Trims ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  37. 37. Other Low Voltage Trims •Glass trim, gasketed for wet environments •Low cost spa and shower light for tubs and shower stalls ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  38. 38. Be Careful with CompactFluorescent Downlights• Square: not IC or AT but looks nice• Round IC – way tall• To get an airtight IC you are limited to 13 watts• In the kitchen downlight you need 32 watts ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  39. 39. Track• Still used in museums for good reason• Permits maximum flexibility• Luminaires equipped easily with spread lenses and UV filters for artwork lighting• Attaches to surface, permits dramatic lighting in condos ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  40. 40. Track• Standard 120 volt track – Low cost general purpose – High cost “museum grade”• Low voltage track• Low voltage specialty systems – Two cable systems – Two rail systems – Two conductor “bars”, “rods”, and ribbons ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  41. 41. Low VoltageLighting•Most recessed low voltage lights have a transformer in the housing•Most low voltage strips and some recessed housings can be connected to a remote transformer ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  42. 42. Accent Lighting Using LowVoltage ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  43. 43. Beam QualityAn unfiltered lamp tends to have• Striation – lines and harsh edges• Halation – rings sometimes with rainbowing• Sharp edges and rapid change – well defined round or elliptical beams ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  44. 44. Taming the (MR16) Beast• Smooth the Beam – Softening Lens (Halo L111 or “solite”) – Spread Lens – Linear Lens• Shield the Source – Baffle or snoot – Louver ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  45. 45. Accent Lighting Technique• Should be located at about 30 degrees off vertical relative to focal point• Do not get too close to wall - normally 24” minimum away• Use 30-60-90 triangle to determine optimum position• Only use lighting systems capable of hitting above 40 degrees (off vertical) in special situations. ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  46. 46. Accent Lighting Recessed accent light Mounting Line Track or monopoint 30-60-90 triangle The distance from the fixture to the artwork Artwork will determine beam angle and candlepower ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  47. 47. Accent Lighting with PAR36 For high ceilings use a low voltage 6” recessed luminaire and a 50 watt PAR36 low voltage lamp ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  48. 48. Accent lighting • Living room, great room, family room • Dining room • Foyer • Hallways/prime art locations • Art niches • Master bedroom reading and art lights • Powder rooms©2005 JAMES BENYA
  49. 49. The Layered Approach toLighting DesignBegin by thinking in layers Decorative Focal Task Ambient ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  50. 50. Layer #1 - The Ambient orGeneral Lighting Layer• Generally the relatively uniform lighting of the space.• Tends to establish mood.• Includes uniform downlighting, indirect lighting (uplighting and wallwashing), and some special techniques, but can also be the decorative lighting• Called “general lighting” if at task levels (30-50 fc or more).• Called “ambient lighting” if lower than task levels ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  51. 51. The Ambient Layer Cove lighting ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  52. 52. Layer #2 - The Task Layer•Generally limited to “task lighting” of the HORIZONTAL WORK SURFACE at work locations.•Tends to help create drama.•Usually produces 50 fc or more within a small area. ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  53. 53. Ambient and Task Lighting Downlighting ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  54. 54. Layer #3 - The Display orFocal Layer• Generally limited to accent lighting and similar effects, primarily through VERTICAL AND OTHER NON- HORIZONTAL SURFACE ILLUMINATION.• Tends to create drama, with greater drama the result of greater contrast between the brightness created by Focal Lighting and Ambient Lighting.• Usually involves key displays at 100 fc or more. ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  55. 55. Ambient, Task and FocalLighting Accent Lighting ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  56. 56. Layer #4 - the Decorative orTraditional Layer• In general, adds the decorative luminaires called for by the architecture/interior design style, period, motif.• Is usually expected to contribute to the ambient illumination. In many designs, the decorative lighting will BE the ambient lighting.• Usually reduces contrast (drama). ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  57. 57. Ambient, Task, Focal andDecorative Lighting Chandelier ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  58. 58. Composition ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  59. 59. Composition •Chandelier (ambient and decorative) •Recessed (task) •Recessed (focal) •Sconce (decorative) ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  60. 60. Composition •Cove (ambient) •Recessed (task) •Undercabinet (task) •Chandelier (decorative) •Sconce (decorative) ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  61. 61. Composition and Planningfor Change •Recessed adjustable lighting •Combined with fixed predictable lighting ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  62. 62. Remote transformers•Address Article 411 and 725 issues – Class 1 – Class 2•Low noise, minimum heat ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  63. 63. WallwashingProduces a flat,even wash of lightfor a wall. You mayfind this is NOT whatyou wanted… ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  64. 64. Types of Wallwashers Rececssed asymmetric styleEyelid styleRecessed lens style Track and surface lens and asymmetric style Semi-recessed lens and open asymmetric style ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  65. 65. Principles of Wallwashing• Fixtures at least 24” out from wall and about 1/4 wall The higher the wall the further height out from wall out to locate wallwashers• Fixtures apart 1 to 1.5 times the distance from the wall• If you don’t need at least three - you At least 2’ shouldn’t be wallwashing ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  66. 66. UndercabinetLightingDON’T• Mount fixtures at back of cabinet• Use luminous front fixtures• Put short fixtures under long cabinets• Put in cheap cool white or daylight lamps ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  67. 67. UndercabinetLightingDO• Use solid front fixtures• Use a lens to diffuse the lamp image over polished countertops• Choose fixtures to be as continuous as possible and wrap around corners ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  68. 68. Low Voltage SpecialtyLighting• Permits finely detailed lighting effects• Use inside and under cabinets and similar locations ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  69. 69. Example: Bookcase ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  70. 70. Example: Cabinet withPolished Countertop ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  71. 71. Things to Remember: Roomby Room•Here is my basic list of lighting considerations•I use this with every client – we expand from there ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  72. 72. Kitchen•Multiple layers permits multiple moods ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  73. 73. Steps to Better Kitchen Lightingby LayersLayer #1 – Light the Task ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  74. 74. Steps to Better Kitchen Lightingby LayersLayer #2 – Ambient Light ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  75. 75. Steps to Better Kitchen Lightingby LayersLayer #3 – Decorative Light ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  76. 76. BathroomLayers•Multiple layers for mood and flexibility ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  77. 77. BathroomLayer #1-TaskLight the Face ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  78. 78. BathroomLayer #1-TaskLight the Face ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  79. 79. BathroomLayer #2-TaskLight the Sink ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  80. 80. BathroomLayer #3-TaskLight the Shower or Tub ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  81. 81. BathroomLayer #4- Night Lights ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  82. 82. Other Lighting Things toRemember• Dimmers and • Controlled controls laid out daylight well and kept • Lens, focus and simple other• Layers in every adjustments must space even be done closets • Good lighting• Built in night lights extends outdoors ©2005 JAMES BENYA
  83. 83. Lighting Design BasicsPresented by BENYA LIGHTING DESIGN For a copy of these slides, www.benyalighting.com ©2005 JAMES BENYA

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