Guide to Information Overload
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Guide to Information Overload

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A guide to help you manage your information consumption, produced by a student of library and information science for other fellow information addicts.

A guide to help you manage your information consumption, produced by a student of library and information science for other fellow information addicts.

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  • 1. A Library Student’s Guide toInformation Overload Hope Harms December 2012
  • 2. Whether you’re researching something specific…
  • 3. … or generallygoing aboutyour day …
  • 4. You may feel like you’re being bombardedwith information.
  • 5. “We suffer frominformationoverconsumption.”Clay A. JohnsonAuthor of The Information Diet
  • 6. “Information overload is asymptom of our desire notto focus on what’simportant. …”
  • 7. “It’s achoice.” Brian Solis Industry Analyst
  • 8. Need help makingbetter choices?
  • 9. Here are 5 simple steps…
  • 10. Observe
  • 11. Pause
  • 12. Look. Whatinformation is in front of you?
  • 13. Seem familiar?
  • 14. What is it about?
  • 15. Who is the source?
  • 16. Who is the source? Experts?
  • 17. Who is the source? Entertainers?
  • 18. Who is the source? Friends and family?
  • 19. Who is the source? Joe Shmoe
  • 20. Who is the source? Joe Shmoe and his dog?
  • 21. How often is it produced?
  • 22. Evaluate
  • 23. Is itreliable?
  • 24. Is ittime sensitive?
  • 25. Is ituseful?
  • 26. Is itentertaining?
  • 27. Organize
  • 28. Group similar types ofinformation …
  • 29. … to give context to the content.
  • 30. Context adds meaning and helps us process information faster.
  • 31. Set limits Cloud storage for yourself Filters Tools are at your fingertips! Note-taking DashboardsFolders Calendars Lists OnlineVoicemail archiving RSS feeds
  • 32. Check out a few of these: Diigo Dropbox Evernote Google Reader Instapaper
  • 33. And don’t forgetthe Delete button.(Because you can probably use your awesome searchskills if you really need that information later.)
  • 34. Prioritize
  • 35. Which informationis mostrelevant?
  • 36. Which informationis mostauthoritative?
  • 37. Which informationmostcontributesto yourunderstanding?
  • 38. Is iturgent?
  • 39. Is itimportant?
  • 40. Can itwait?
  • 41. Do youneed itnow?
  • 42. Plan what and when you’llconsume your information.Maybe some morning news over coffee. An audiobook during the work commute. Pass the afternoon break with Facebook. Perhaps some homework after dinner.
  • 43. Consume
  • 44. Followyour plan…
  • 45. … but set asidetime to explore.
  • 46. No need to plunge intoan ocean of information…
  • 47. …just skimthe surface.
  • 48. Take timeto unplug.
  • 49. And …
  • 50. And …make time for people, too.
  • 51. Find abalance
  • 52. that works for you. Find abalance
  • 53. Observe
  • 54. Evaluate
  • 55. Organize
  • 56. Prioritize
  • 57. Consume
  • 58. So easy, you can do it onone hand.
  • 59. For more information…Braum, H. (2012, October 16). Managing professional information overload.Retrieved from http://nekls.libguides.com/info-overloadHoughton-Jan, S. (2008, July 29). Being wired or being tired: 10 ways to cope withinformation overload. Adriadne, 56. Retrieved fromhttp://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/houghton-janJohnson, C. A. (2012). The information diet. Retrieved fromhttp://www.informationdiet.comKirkpatrick, M. (2009, May 25). Groups: Turn information overload into an asset.ReadWrite. Retrieved fromhttp://readwrite.com/2009/05/25/groups_turn_information_overload_into_an_assetMind Tools. (2012). The urgent/important matrix. Retrieved fromhttp://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newHTE_91.htmPurdue University. (2012). Evaluation. Retrieved fromhttp://www.lib.purdue.edu/rguides/studentinstruction/evaluationSolis, B. (2012, May 15). The fallacy of information overload. Retrieved fromhttp://www.briansolis.com/2012/05/the-fallacy-of-information-overload
  • 60. Image creditsFlickr – A Conversation (Khalid Albaih)freerangestock.com – Plug (Chance Agrella)openclipart.com – Balanza (Enhy), Book (Janisroznieks), Dog (Drunken_Duck),Family2 (Papapishu), Juggler Clown (sammo241), Man (AK), Pac-Man, Pause,Woman Doctor (Gerald_G)stockfreeimages.com – Blank note (Brentmelissa), Business woman in office(Amaxim), Cake vs. apple (Qtrix), Calculator (Podfoto), Calendar (Miszmasz ),Compass on the map (Photooiasson ), Delete (Lostbear), Friends sitting on the grass(Lykovata), Graduation cap on top of book pile (Jarenwicklund), Green target andred dart (Ghen), Hour Glass (Palto), Idea (Monika3stepsahead ), Isolated Colosseum(Frenchmen77), Lying royal flush cards (Golovanov), Old binoculars (Kvkirillov), Seticons - 23A. Tools (Markov), Snorkeling man (Veredinka), Stopwatch in hand(GeoffreyWhiteway), Sunset Puzzle (Frenchmen77), Target background (Tamilsma),Underwater reef (connelld)Unpublished – Hands (Tyler Harms), Twitter Blur (Hope Harms)Wikimedia Commons – Duct-tape (Evan-Amos)
  • 61. Thank you and good luck!