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Patriot or loyalist
Patriot or loyalist
Patriot or loyalist
Patriot or loyalist
Patriot or loyalist
Patriot or loyalist
Patriot or loyalist
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Patriot or loyalist

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  • 1. PATRIOTS A person who supported breaking away from England and making a new country.
  • 2. LOYALISTS A person who believed that the colonies should remain part of England and stay loyal to the King of England.
  • 3. PROPAGANDA Information that is presented in a way that is meant to influence an audience’s behaviors or opinions. Often used by governmental groups or the governments themselves
  • 4. ADVERTISING TECHNIQUES THE FOLLOWING PERSUASIVE TECHNIQUES ARE OFTEN USED TO GET PEOPLE TO BUY PRODUCTS Loaded words: Words with strong associations such as “home,” “family,” “dishonest” and “wasteful.” Transference: Attempts to make the audience associate positive words, images, and ideas with a product and its users. Name calling: Comparing one product to another and saying it is weaker or inferior in quality or taste. Glittering generality: Using words that are positive and appealing, but too vague to have any real meaning, like “pure and natural.” Testimonial: A product is endorsed by a celebrity or by an expert. Bandwagon: The advertiser tries to make you feel like everyone else has the product and if you don’t have it too, you’ll be left out. Snob appeal: The opposite of the bandwagon technique, snob appeal makes the case that using the product means the consumer is better/smarter/richer than everyone else. Repetition: A product’s name or catchphrase is repeated over and over, with the goal of having it stick in the viewer or listener’s mind. Flattery: The advertiser appeals to the audience’s vanity by implying that smart/popular/rich people buy the product. Plain folks: The advertiser says or implies that people just like you use a product. (This often takes the form of a testimonial.) Emotional appeals: The advertiser appeals to people’s fears, joys, sense of nostalgia, etc. Facts and figures: Using statistics, research, or other data to make the product appear to be better than its competitors. Special offer: The advertiser offers a discount, coupon, free gift, or other enticement to get people to buy a product. Urgency: The advertiser makes you feel like you need the product right away.
  • 5. PLANNING SHEET Planning sheet due on Tuesday Ad due on Thursday 11/4/10

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