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Push_Mail
Push_Mail
Push_Mail
Push_Mail
Push_Mail
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Push_Mail
Push_Mail
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Push_Mail

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Presentation for my article on push mail. …

Presentation for my article on push mail.

For my article on Push Mail visit : http://www.slideshare.net/hardeep4u/push-mail

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  • 1. PUSH MAIL By,Hardeep Singh Bhurji
  • 2. CONTENTSWHAT IS PUSH EMAILPROTOCAL USED IN PUSH MAIL TECHNOLOGYSOME POPULAR PUSH MAIL SETUPSDIFFERENT PUSH MAIL PROVIDERS
  • 3. WHAT IS A PUSH MAIL ?Push email is a method of pushing content (email in this case) over theinternet to your targeted audience.Technically Push Mail can be defined as a e-mail systems that provide an always-on capability, in which new e-mail is actively transferred (pushed) as it arrives bythe mail delivery agent (MDA) (commonly called mail server) to the mail useragent (MUA), also called the e-mail client. E-mail clients include smartphonesand, less strictly, IMAP personal computer mail applications.Push email utilizes a mail delivery system with real-time capability to “push”email through to the client as soon as it arrives, rather than requiring the client topoll and collect or pull mail manually. With a push email smartphone, for example,the client’s mailbox is constantly updated with arriving email without userintervention. Smartphones announce new mail arrival with an alert.
  • 4. WHAT IS A PUSH MAIL ?Push email can be especially crucial to field reporters, stock marketbusinessmen, military personal and other professionals for whom time isof the essence. A one-minute delay can make all the difference in breaking astory, losing money, or making a crucial sale.
  • 5. START OF PUSH MAILAlthough push e-mail had existed in wired-based systems for many years,one of the first uses of the system with a portable, "always on" wirelessdevice outside of Asia was the BlackBerry service from Research InMotion. In Japan, "push e-mail" has been standard in cell phones since2000.BlackBerry was the first personal digital assistant (PDA) to offer pushemail and gained near-instant success as a result. Today, many deviceshave incorporated push email, and its popularity continues to grow. Someof the products that have incorporated push email include Chatteremailfor Treo, Nokia Intellisync Wireless Email, Roadsync, and SonyEricsson phones.
  • 6. PROTOCAL USED IN PUSH MAIL TECHNOLOGYThe different protocols used in Push Mail technology are as follows : RIM’s standards for BlackBerry. Push-IMAP SyncML IETF Lemonade (Its an extension to IMAP and SMTP) Microsoft Exchange 2003 standards.
  • 7. SOME POPULAR PUSH MAIL SETUPS  Microsoft’s Direct Push  The IMAP IDLE Push  RIM BlackBerry Push
  • 8. Microsoft’s Direct Push The smartphone sends an HTTP request to the Exchange server, asking to be notified when something changes on the server. This request lasts for the shorter of (a) a timeout period and (b) a change on the server. If there is a change, the Exchange server responds to the smartphone with details of the folders in which the changes have occurred. Upon receiving this response, the smartphone sends a synchronization request in respect of each of the folders notified by the server, and the server delivers the details of the changes – depending on signal strength / connection speed.
  • 9. Microsoft’s Direct Push
  • 10. Microsoft’s Direct Push If there is no change within the timeout period, the Exchange server sends an empty response to the smartphone. In either case, when the smartphone receives the Exchange response, it reissues the HTTP request – essentially, this is a looping process, and the issue / receive loop is often referred to as the “heartbeat”. Each heartbeat is 309 bytes, and, by default, a heartbeat is issued every 15 minutes.
  • 11. The IMAP IDLE Push IMAP system works by notifying the smartphone of any changes in the folders on the server when the user is actively monitoring the server. This only works when the mail client on the smartphone is active, and thus notifications stop when a user stops using the mail application or puts the smartphone away. IMAP IDLE issues a “NOOP” (“No Operation”) command to the IMAP server at a regular interval, usually every 15 minutes. By sending this command, the connection is kept active, and thus the user is notified of any changes.
  • 12. The IMAP IDLE Push
  • 13. RIM BlackBerry Push To receive data RIM uses a Network Operating Centre (NOC). Here the email is forwarded to your BlackBerry by the RIM-operated NOC only when there is email. Only the first chunk of email is sent. The data is sent via normal UDP packets that are encrypted at the data level. To find out if there is a mail or not the NOC constantly polls the inbox. Once there is a mail the NOC encrypts the data and sends it to the device immediately where ever it is located. In the absence of email, nothing at all happens, and your BlackBerry behaves much like a normal mobile phone.
  • 14. RIM BlackBerry Push
  • 15. DIFFERENT PUSH MAIL PROVIDERS Apple iPhone and iPod Touch Google Android Microsoft Windows Mobile and Windows Phone Nokia Symbian Series 60 Nokia Messaging Research In Motion BlackBerry SEVEN Networks Sony Ericsson
  • 16. THANKS

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