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Digital Advertising Agencies 2013 Digital Advertising Agencies 2013 Document Transcript

  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013:A Buyer’s GuideA Digital Marketing Depot Research Report
  • Search DelivereD Smarter Search and social solutions that increase your brand IQPassion. Innovation. Partnership.As the leading global search marketing agency, our staff has a passion for delivering great results. We have theexpertise to create innovative search, social media and content marketing programs. And most importantly, ourteam strives to create long-lasting, solid partnerships that make it all happen.That’s why we’ve taken great care to build an award winning, world-class team of digital advertising professionalswho know how to drive ROI for the world’s largest advertisers while managing diverse, intricate and holistic SEO,SEM and social marketing programs. That’s why in the search and social media arena, we’re the eyes and theears for our clients, which enable us to help advertisers identify opportunities, increase performance and improvereturn on ad spend.That’s Covario. Search delivered smarter.For more information visit covario.com or call 858.397.1500
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideScope and MethodologyThis report was written for marketers and advertisers who are looking for an agency to manage some or all of their digitalmarketing initiatives. The goal is to help the audience navigate the many choices available and make a more informeddecision within the current agency market, including what digital marketing capabilities and services are most important totheir organizations. This report answers the following questions: • What trends are influencing the digital agency landscape? • How can I determine if my company needs a digital agency? • What type of agency is the best fit for my organization? • What is the process for choosing a digital agency? • What questions do I need to include in an RFI or an RFP?The report draws from Wikipedia’s definition of an interactive agency, to define digital agencies as companies that providespecialized advertising and marketing services for the digital space. They are independent from the client and provide anoutside point of view to the effort of selling the client’s products or services.Digital agencies may provide some or all of the following capabilities: digital lead generation, digital brand development,interactive marketing and communications strategy, rich media campaigns, interactive video brand experiences, websitedesign and development, e-learning tools, email marketing, public relations, SEO/PPC services, social media marketing,mobile campaign development and management, content creation and management services, and data mining and ROIassessment.If you are considering hiring an agency for one or more digital advertising channels, this report will help you decide whetheror not you need to. It will give you an overview of the current state of the market, including key trends, as well as in-depthinformation about the process of choosing a digital agency.The report was prepared by conducting numerous in-depth interviews with leading digital agency executives, advertisers,and industry experts from March through October 2012. These interviews, in addition to third party research, form the basisfor this report. In particular, Digital Marketing Depot would like to thank the following industry executives for their time andprofessional insights:Marty Weintraub, CEO, aimClearBruce Clay, Founder & President, Bruce Clay, Inc.Seth Besmertnik, CEO, ConductorMike Gullaksen, SVP, Managing Director, and Jeff Johnson, SVP, Managing Director, CovarioKen Dobell, President, DAC GroupKevin Lee, CEO, DiditAaron Baker, CEO, Digital Net Agency (DNA)Rob Garner, VP, Strategy, iCrossingRob Eleveld, CEO, OptifyDana Todd, SVP, Marketing, and Sarna Goldenberg, VP, Marketing, PerformicsElliott Easterling, CEO, RBMGeorge Michie, CEO, and Ryan Gibson, VP, Marketing, RKGJason Tabeling, Associate Partner, Search & Media, RosettaJane Bedford, Principal & Founder, Kerry Kielb, Senior Consultant, and Dan Plachta, Engagement Manager, The BedfordGroupResearch/Writer: Karen BurkaEditor: Claire Schoen, Digital Marketing Depot (http://digitalmarketingdepot.com)© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 1 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideTable of ContentsDigital Agency Capabilities and Services..................................................................................................................................... 3 Table 1: Selected Digital Agency Capabilities................................................................................................................... 4 Lines blur Between Paid, Owned, and Earned Media.......................................................................................................... 5 Table 2: The Lines Blur between Paid, Owned & Earned Media...................................................................................... 5Digital Advertising Agency Market Trends................................................................................................................................... 6 Trend #1: Digital Advertising’s Increasing Share of Overall Agency Revenue ..................................................................... 6 Table 3: Digital Services Share of Overall Agency Revenue, 2010 vs. 2011..................................................................... 6 Table 4: Digital Revenue Share Growth for WPP and Publicis Groupe, 2010 vs. 2011................................................... 6 Table 5: 2011 Internet Advertising Revenue (in $ millions)............................................................................................... 7 Trend #2: Holding Companies and Agencies Use Mergers and Acquisitions to Meet Advertiser Demand for Digital Expertise................................................................................................................................................. 7 Table 6: Selected Holding and Media Company Acquisitions of Digital Agencies.......................................................... 7 Table 7: Most Active Strategic Buyers, 2011..................................................................................................................... 8 Table 8: Selected Digital Agency Acquisitions.................................................................................................................. 8 Trend #3: Traditional Fee Structures Evolve to Include Performance-based Compensation............................................... 9 Table 9: 2011 Share of Internet Ad Revenue by Fee Structure......................................................................................... 9Choosing a Digital Advertising Agency..................................................................................................................................... 10 Step One: Company Self Assessment – Do You Need a Digital Agency?.......................................................................... 10 Step Two: Understand Agency Fee Structures ................................................................................................................... 10 Table 10: Selected Digital Agency Fee Structures.......................................................................................................... 11 Step Three: Begin the Selection Process: Phone Calls, RFIs and RFPs............................................................................... 12 Table 11: Business Information to Provide in an Agency RFP......................................................................................... 13 Table 12: Questions to ask an Agency in an RFP............................................................................................................ 14 Step Four: Choosing the Right Agency .............................................................................................................................. 14 Table 13: Sample Agency Decision Matrix...................................................................................................................... 15 Step Five: Negotiate Contract Terms.................................................................................................................................. 17Conclusion.................................................................................................................................................................................. 18Resources.................................................................................................................................................................................... 19Agency Resources....................................................................................................................................................................... 19© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 2 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideDigital Agency Capabilities and ServicesA proliferation of channels has made digital marketing more complex than ever before. Search advertising models ofpay-per-click (PPC) are now available on social media networks. Whereas social marketing once meant a Facebook brandpage, advertisers are now allocating budget among a growing array of major social media including Pinterest, LinkedIn,Google+, YouTube, and Twitter. Search engine optimization (SEO) has spawned a new channel of content marketing, asmarketers compete to generate traffic and attract customers. Digital maps and applications for local markets such as Yelpor Foursquare have changed marketing at the local level, both for small companies as well as national brands. Mobilemarketing has become its own discipline, with unique design, development, and distribution requirements.Faced with this emerging digital marketing landscape, as well as limitedresources, and higher C-level expectations, advertisers and marketers are More than half – or 58%increasingly using digital agencies. More than half – or 58% – of marketers – of marketers surveyedsurveyed by digital technology firm PulsePoint said they expect to increase theirrelationships with digital agencies in the next twelve months. by digital technology firm PulsePoint saidDigital agencies come in all shapes and sizes. At the high end, for global brands,are the agency holding companies with full-service digital agencies around the they expect to increaseworld. There are also boutique and specialty agencies (two terms that are usedinterchangeably in this report) that provide channel-specific digital marketing their relationships withservices such as mobile messaging programs, social media marketing, or SEO digital agencies in thelink-building campaigns. Like any organization, each type of agency has its ownstrengths, weaknesses, and culture. next twelve months.Agencies owned by large media or holding companies can provide the following benefits: • Diversity of capabilities from co-owned media properties; • Built-in sister agency relationships and priority referrals; and • In-network efficiencies.Most full-service digital agencies manage a brand’s presence on many channels, manage a brand’s advertising technology/analytics platforms, and provide professional services. Technology offered to clients, such as bid management software orsocial media listening tools, is usually sourced from third parties. Client account management and support are largely basedon client size and spend. Agencies owned by holding companies generally require minimum monthly spends in the six-to-eight figure range. That level of investment typically buys a dedicated account staff, an “agency-within-an agency” that canmanage the brand across the entire holding company.Working with a specialty or boutique agency offers unique benefits as well, including: • More granular channel strategy and tactical expertise; • Client access to agency decision makers and top personnel; and • Lower spending minimums.Specialty agencies offer a subset of the services provided by full-service agencies. These services may be channel specific,such as social media or SEO, or media specific such as display advertising or email marketing programs.Dozens of specialty agencies have launched over the past five years, a market dynamic called the “agency long tail” bysome industry executives. Prompted by the mid-market opportunity created by holding company agencies with hugeminimum spends, and wireless technologies that have made it easier to start up small businesses, many large agencyexecutives with strong client relationships have left their firms after an acquisition and opened specialty agencies.Table 1 illustrates the broad range of services that digital agencies provide. A full-service agency offers breadth ofprofessional and channel services, while specialty agencies can provide depth within a channel, including proprietary PPC orSEO platforms and extensive client training in software use, integration, and customization.© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 3 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com Table 1: Selected Digital Agency Capabilities Selected Digital Agency Capabilities Professional Channel Services ServicesDigital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s Guide Search Social Public Website Mobile Email Display Strategy Branding Media Relations Media Planning 4 Customer Research Benchmarking Best Practices SEO Paid Reputation Blogging/content Design & Program Program Media planning Customer Support management creation development development & development & & buying Search Content creation/ Online publicity Content creation execution execution Creative Onboarding management SEO/link-building Ecommerce Bluetooth apps List/database Branding Reports/Deliverables Brand compliance Online brand CSEs Website audits development Display retargeting Influencer outreach monitoring Microsites App & game Lead generation © 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com Keyword research Bid management Community building development Content creation & & optimization Global programs Video/commercial optimization Landing page Sentiment analysis design Link analysis optimization Video design/ Local/geo-search Affiliate marketing development Mobile programs Search retargeting Social display/ International tracking Campaign retargeting Campaign management management Source: Third Door Media
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideLines Blur between Paid, Owned, and Earned MediaAdvertisers and agencies have traditionally classified media as either paid, owned, or earned. Paid media refers toadvertising that is purchased, such as print, web, or broadcast advertising. Owned media belongs to the brand, such asprint brochures or website content, while earned media encompasses public relations and reputation management.Driven largely by social media and user-generated content, the lines are blurring between these previously separate mediatypes (see Table 2). For example, Twitter is a social media channel, which can be considered ‘owned’ media, but the brandbounce that occurs from retweeting becomes ‘earned’ media because it furthers brand awareness. ‘Paid’ media now includescontent marketing campaigns or sponsored messages on social media channels -- as well as the more traditional display or PPCsearch advertising. Social strategy and mobile programs are closely linked, as are website and social or mobile app creativedevelopment. The media are converging.The result is that the lines are blurring for agencies and their clients, as well. Many agencies are evolving their serviceofferings and fee structures to meet client demand for more integrated campaigns that cross those lines, and clearly definedfees that better reflect the work involved. Table 2: The Lines Blur between Paid, Owned & Earned Media Paid/Earned Media: Paid/Owned Media: Social media ads, shares, Paid Media Mobile ads, apps, games likes, reputation management Paid search Social ads, Twitter content, Mobile ads, shares, reviews blogs Display Social (FB ads/sponsored tweets) Mobile (ads) Email lists Earned/Owned/Paid Media Social ads, blogs, shares, sponsored content Mobile apps, shares, ads Earned Media Owned Media SEO Mobile (apps/games) Social (retweets/likes/shares) Website content reputation management) Email Mobile (shares/reviews) Social (FB pages, CSEs blogs/ Twitter accts.) Earned/Owned Media: Social likes, shares, retweets Mobile ads, shares, reviews Source: Third Door Media© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 5 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideDigital Advertising Agency Market TrendsThere are several important trends driving digital Table 3: Digital Services Share of Overallagency market growth and change, including: Agency Revenue, 2010 vs. 2011 2010 2011 1. Digital advertising’s increasing share of overall agency revenue. 2. The growth in agency mergers, acquisitions, and new launches to more quickly meet advertiser demand for digital expertise. 3. The evolution of traditional pricing models to include performance-based pricing.The following section discusses each of thesetrends in more detail.Trend #1: Digital Advertising’s Source: Ad Age DataCenterIncreasing Share of Overall Agency RevenueWhether trying to integrate cross-channel campaign data, more effectively use display ads to retarget website visitors,or develop a Pinterest page, more marketers and advertisers are using digital media to reach increasingly fragmentedaudiences. Agencies are benefiting from this growth, as marketers and advertisers seek greater digital media expertise andbottom-line impact from their efforts.Digital revenue grew 16.4% in 2011 to $10.1 billion, and represented 30.3% of all U.S. agency revenue, compared to 28.0%in 2010, according to Ad Age’s DataCenter, which compiles data on nearly 1,000 agencies and agency networks (see Table3). Digital agencies, which include pure plays, search, social media, and mobile marketing agencies, accounted for six ofevery ten dollars in digital spending, or $5.9 billion.Two international holding companies, Publicis Table 4: Digital Revenue Share Growth for WPPGroupe and WPP, which own numerous digital and and Publicis Groupe, 2010 vs. 2011traditional agency brands, reported similar 2011results. Digital accounted for 30.6% of PublicisGroupe’s 2011 worldwide revenue, up from 28.0% in2010; while WPP said direct, digital and interactiverevenue rose to 29.7% of 2011 revenue, comparedto 28.9% in 2010 (see Table 4).Advertiser adoption of digital media also droverecord revenue for online publishers and adnetworks, according to the Internet AdvertisingBureau (IAB). The 2011 IAB Internet AdvertisingRevenue Report found that overall U.S. Internetadvertising revenue reached $31.7 billion in2011, a 21.9% increase over $26.0 billion in 2010(see Table 5). The IAB’s total includes revenuefrom websites, ad networks, commercial onlineservices, mobile devices, email providers, andother companies selling online advertising. Thesenumbers represent a subset of all media servicesprovided by agencies, but demonstrate just how Source: Company data, Third Door Mediaquickly digital advertising continues to grow.© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 6 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
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  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideTrend #2: Holding Companies and Agencies Use Mergers and Acquisitions to Meet AdvertiserDemand for Digital ExpertiseMergers and acquisitions (M&A) are having a dramatic Table 5: 2011 Internet Advertising Revenue (in $ millions)impact on the size and scope of the digital advertisingagency market, as marketers increase their demand forexpertise and more integrated digital programs. Largeinternational holding companies such as Japan’s Dentsu andFrance’s Publicis Groupe have spent billions on acquisitionsover the past five years in an effort to create worldwide,full-service networks that provide a broad spectrum of digitalmarketing capabilities and services. Note: Display relatedIn July 2012, Dentsu announced a nearly $5 billion agreement includes digital video commercials, adto purchase London-based Aegis, which owns such brands banners/ display ads,as Carat, a large media buying agency, and Isobar, a digital sponsorships, andadvertising network of iProspect-branded agencies (see Table rich media.6). Just one month earlier, London-based WPP acquired Source: Internet Advertising Bureaudigital marketing agency AKQA for $550 million. Table 6: Selected Holding and Media Company Acquisitions of Digital Agencies Acquirer Acquired/Merged Date Notes Aegis Group plc Communicate 2 August 2012 India-based search agency I Spy Marketing August 2012 U.K.-based digital agency Catch Stone July 2012 Chinese digital agency bought for £55.2MM Roundarch February 2012 Purchased for $125MM iProspect December 2004 Purchased for $32MM with performance incentives; made part of Aegis’ Isobar network Dentsu Aegis July 2012 $4.9 billion purchase price Steak Group June 2011 U.K.-based digital media agency Firstborn February 2011 NY-based digital agency with animation and web development services Innovation Interactive (360i) January 2010 Included digital agency 360i and PPC platform IgnitionOne Epsilon Aspen Marketing Services April 2011 Purchased for $345MM Hearst Corp. iCrossing June 2010 Acquired for estimated $325MM Interpublic FUSE February 2012 U.K.-based digital agency Group CUBOCC March 2010 Brazilian digital marketing agency Reprise Media April 2007 Bolstered search marketing capabilities Merkle IMPAQT March 2011 Added search to existing CRM capabilities Publicis Groupe Big Fuel July 2011 Bought 51% of the social media agency Rosetta May 2011 $575MM acquisition to complement U.S. search & digital marketing brands Razorfish October 2009 Purchased for $530MM in cash and PG treasury shares; part of VivaKi Performics September 2008 Operates as part of VivaKi WPP Hungama Digital Services June 2012 India-based digital agency purchased by JWT Fortune Cookie August 2012 Acquired by WPP agency Posssible Worldwide AKQA June 2012 $550MM purchase price DTDigital January 2012 WPP subsidiary Ogilvy bought 33.3% stake in Australian digital agency Source: Third Door Media© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 7 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuidePublicis Groupe purchased Rosetta Marketing Table 7: Most Active Strategic Buyers, 2011Group, one of the largest independent digitalagencies, for about $575 million in May 2011.Rosetta became the fourth large digital agencyacquisition for Publicis, which bought Digitasfor $1.3 billion in December 2006, Performicsfor an undisclosed sum in September 2008, andRazorfish for $530 million in October 2009.Agency holding companies have been someof the most aggressive strategic buyersin the marketing, media, technology, andservice industries, according to investmentbanking firm PetskyPrunier, which specializesin marketing services industry mergers andacquisitions. Publicis Groupe, WPP, InterpublicGroup, and Omnicom Group, representedfour of the top ten strategic buyers in themarketing, media, technology, and service Source: PetskyPrunierindustries in 2011 with 56 acquisitions betweenthem (see Table 7). Agency holding companiescontinued their acquisition spree in the first half of 2012, as WPP, Publicis Groupe, Interpublic Group, and Omnicom Grouphad a combined 33 acquisitions in the first six months of the year.Magazine publisher Hearst Corporation entered the digital advertising agency space when it acquired leading independentagency iCrossing in June 2010. Hearst executives said the purchase would allow the company to offer a holistic set ofmarketing services to its clients and agency customers.At the same time, search marketing agencies looking to strengthen core competencies and expand their digital channelservices have responded with mergers and acquisitions of their own (see Table 8). In June 2010, four search marketingagencies – 10e20, Search and Social, Brent Csutoras and SecondStep Search – merged to form BlueGlass Interactive toprovide a broad array of search and social marketing services. Charlottesville, VA-based RKG, formerly known as Rimm-Kaufman Group, acquired AudetteMedia in August 2011 to enhance its SEO technology and services. Table 8: Selected Digital Agency Acquisitions Acquirer Acquired/Merged Date Notes BlueGlass Interactive 3 Dog Media October 2012 Search marketing agency 10e20, Search & Social, June 2010 Four agencies merged to form BlueGlass Interactive Brent Csutoras Inc., and SecondStep Search Covario Top Local Search May 2012 Location-based traffic and optimization NetConcepts January 2010 Acquired GravityStream technology for fully automated SEO Didit Inceptor August 2012 Added SEO, CSE and social media capabilities iCrossing Wallaby Group September 2011 Expanded presence into Latin America and Europe iProspect ICUC Moderation June 2011 Global online content and community moderation services Services Range Online Media September 2008 Search agency with strong retail clientele RKG AudetteMedia August 2011 Added SEO capabilities to PPC, social, and display (Rimm-Kaufman Group) Rosetta Level Studios September 2010 West coast mobile agency Wishbone January 2010 Healthcare marketing agency Source: Third Door Media© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 8 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideCovario made two acquisitions since January 2010. The agency purchased NetConcepts in January 2010 to furtherautomate its SEO offerings, and added Top Local Search in May 2012 to provide its clients with location-based trafficand optimization capabilities. The company’s goal with these moves was to create a point-solution approach for specificSEO and social media software tools that can stand alone from its agency services as well as add to its list of offerings toagency clients.Trend #3: Traditional Fee Structures Evolve to Include Performance-based CompensationTraditional agency fee structures, namely time-based and percentage of spend, are evolving to include more retainer-based deals, as well as performance-based hybrids that link client fees to measurable campaign results, such as clicks,impressions, conversions or sales. With tighter advertising budgets and increasing scrutiny on bottom-line results, thegoal is for clients and agencies to share the risk when trying new campaign strategies or tactics, yet fairly compensate theagency for its time and work.Many agencies are using a performance-based Table 9: 2011 Share of Internet Ad Revenue by Fee Structurecompensation hybrid that includes a time-based,fixed-fee, or percentage-of-spend component,along with a performance-based bonus or incentiveon paid media programs. Some industry expertscaution that performance-based models can actuallydiscourage innovation precisely because of therisk involved. (See page 11 for further discussion ofpricing and fee structures.)As a result, the fixed-fee or retainer-based feemodel, which provides predictable revenueand expenses for agencies and their clients, isalso gaining traction. Retainers may do moreto encourage agencies to test new campaignstrategies and tactics, knowing that they will becompensated for their time regardless of results. Source: Internet Advertising BureauPerformance-based revenue represented nearly two-thirds of all Internet advertising revenue for the year; more thandouble the revenue for impression-based digital revenue, according to the 2011 IAB Internet Advertising Revenue Report(see Table 9). Performance-based revenue totaled $20.5 billion in 2011, a 26.5% increase over $16.2 billion in 2010. TheIAB defines impression-based revenue as any non-measurable ad revenue, such as digital display ads. Performance-basedrevenue represents ad revenue derived from a user action, such as clicks on a sponsored search result. All of the revenuerefers to paid media only, and does not include revenue generated from earned or owned media.More advertisers and marketers are planning Many agencies are using ato increase their performance-based agencyrelationships. Nearly half of the marketers responding performance-based compensationto a 2012 PulsePoint survey said they expect toincrease performance-based compensation based hybrid that includes a time-based,on sales in the next twelve months. Forty percent of fixed-fee, or percentage-of-spendrespondents said they expect to increase performance-based compensation based on marketing metrics. component, along with a performance- based bonus or incentive on paid media programs.© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 9 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideChoosing a Digital Advertising AgencyUltimately, the decision to hire a digital agency is a significant investment that requires a rigorous evaluation of yourbusiness’s and any potential agency partner’s needs, resources, and cultures. The following sections discuss five stepsinvolved in making a more informed and successful choice.Step One: Company Self Assessment – Do You Need a Digital Agency?Deciding whether or not your company needs to hire a digital advertising agency calls for the same evaluative stepsinvolved in any significant investment, including a comprehensive self-assessment of your organization’s internal strengths,challenges, and needs from a business, staffing, and technology perspective. This includes answering questions such as: • What are the primary objectives we want to achieve? Working with an agency can help advertisers that are looking to scale their digital initiatives but lack enough in-house resources to do so. Find clarity and consensus on what you’re looking to achieve. If your digital programs are falling short of management’s ROI goals, an agency’s expertise may be able to help you improve campaign or channel results. • Do we need a full-service agency or boutique? Traditionally, advertisers have hired an agency of record (AOR) to handle all of their advertising needs. But one-stop advertising shops may not represent best-of-breed expertise in every digital channel. Many advertisers hire both AORs and boutique agencies with expertise in SEO or social media, for example. If managing multiple agencies is too cumbersome or expensive, a full-service digital agency may be the right choice. • Who will manage the agency relationship? Every successful partnership needs a champion who is invested in that partnership’s success and can pull together the disparate groups that have a stake in the outcome or a role to play. For example, marketers may voice different wants and needs than an IT department, but both may be important to campaign development and execution. By designating a “point person” within the business even before you send out an RFP, you will ensure the steady flow of information throughout the process so that expectations are met.It is also vital to assess your own business’s culture and priorities before beginning the selection process. For example, isgood creative more important than reporting capabilities? If so, you’ll need to target agencies with those strengths. If not,you’ll want to speak to more agencies with strong analytical capabilities. Here are several other factors to consider:Accountability: Digital campaigns have many moving parts, and in-house marketers can often be too busy to micromanageevery detail. Think about how much you’ll need to rely on your agency to stay on top of every deliverable and howproactive you’ll want them to be regarding any campaigns that aren’t going according to plan.Flexibility: How flexible and accommodating do you need an agency to be? In-house marketing teams often experiencescope creep, which can create missed deadlines and budget overruns for their agencies. Not all agencies have thestaff or inclination to switch gears mid campaign when clients request changes. If it’s important to you that an agencyaccommodates your wishes, even if it costs time and money, make sure to say so up front.Communication: How much communication do you want or need? How important is the geographic location of youragency? You may be the type to ask a lot of questions or want to have periodic in-person meetings. If so, look for anagency that has an office close to your location and welcomes the frequent interaction. If you’re looking for a more turn-keyrelationship, location won’t be as important as the confidence and skill of the account team managing your business.Step Two: Understand Agency Fee StructuresAgency free structures vary widely, even within client accounts. It is not uncommon for a client to compensate their agencyusing different fee structures for different types of media campaigns. For example, one of the most common agencyfee models for paid media buying is percentage of spend. Typically, an agency will be paid 10 to 20 percent of a client’sdigital media spend on paid search or display advertising campaigns. Smaller clients may pay a higher percentage, whileenterprise clients may pay a smaller percentage due to the larger dollar volume of their accounts.© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 10 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideEach fee structure has advantages and challenges for different types ofmedia (see Table 10). Many agencies use time-based pricing, which is based Many agencies useon a set hourly fee to track all time spent on a client’s earned and owned time-based pricing,media accounts. In these types of arrangements, it is important for the clientand agency to discuss and negotiate minimums and perhaps maximums to which is based on a setfacilitate budget planning. Clients must also be vigilant about agency staff hourly fee to track allefficiency, since the agency is paid for an agreed-upon number of hours,regardless of how much work is accomplished. time spent on a client’sAlso gaining traction is the fixed-fee or retainer-based model, which provides earned and ownedpredictable expenses for marketers and advertisers, particularly on long-term media accounts.accounts that require ongoing maintenance, such as monitoring SEO rankingsor social media content. Retainers may also encourage agencies to test newcampaign strategies and tactics, knowing that they will be compensated for their time regardless of results.Increasingly, agencies are using performance-based hybrids that include a time-based, fixed-fee, or percentage-of-spendrate, as well as a smaller performance-based component for paid media work. The goal is for clients and agencies to sharethe risk when trying new campaign strategies or tactics, yet fairly compensate the agency for its time and work. This is also away for agencies to become more competitive in the base pricing; by adding in bonuses based on performance, the initialagency fee may be lowered.However, some industry experts caution that performance-based models can actually discourage innovation precisely becauseof the risk involved. Some agencies may not feel comfortable with taking on extra work with no guaranteed reward. Successfulperformance-based compensation arrangements that benefit both agency and client require trust, negotiation, and clarityabout campaign rules and ownership. For example, an agency might require implementation of all agency-recommendedlanding page changes or updates within a certain time frame to ensure the types of results needed to kick in the performancebonus. Table 10: Selected Digital Agency Fee Structures Fee Model Most Appropriate Media Advantages Challenges Percentage of spend Paid media (PPC, display) Expense predictability Agency goal to increase spending and media buys may result in higher costs but depress ROI. Time based Earned and owned media Negotiated hourly fee assures Less predictable expenses that (SEO, social, mobile) client is only paying for actual depend on campaigns being run on time put into account work. time or in a particular time frame. Questions may emerge about whether account staff is working efficiently. Retainer or fixed fee Owned and earned (SEO, Consistent, predictable Large spending or budget changes social, mobile) expenses. May encourage may necessitate renegotiating fees. more long-term, strategic Questions may emerge about whether thinking because agency is paid account staff is working efficiently or regardless of results. enough hours. Performance based Paid and earned media (Paid Agency shares risk with the client Frequent renegotiating due to over- or search, display, some social) on campaign performance. underperforming campaigns. Agency may stick to “tried and true” tactics to guarantee revenue, rather than look at long-term results, strategy. Source: Third Door Media© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 11 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
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  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuidePotential Add-on FeesThird-party software and campaign set-up fees are common agency add-on Search Agency Feecharges. Setting up digital marketing campaigns can be time consuming. StructuresOnce an advertiser’s goals are understood, an agency should openly discusswith the advertiser how long a campaign will take to set up. Depending on In addition to the more generalthe complexity of this set up, an advertiser may be charged a one-time fee digital agency billing options, searchor monthly installments. marketing agencies may offer the following fee models to potential PPCSome agencies will roll third-party software fees into a monthly clients:management fee, making them less transparent. It is important foradvertisers to understand what an agency is doing in house and what it is 1. Number of Keywords underoutsourcing, including why the function is being outsourced and what are Management. Now becoming lessthe costs associated with the software. In some instances, agencies provide popular, many search agenciesexcellent services but do not have the development team to write their own charge clients for the number ofapplications. Conversely, there are some excellent software solutions that do keywords being managed and hownot offer agency services and focus on providing the best software possible. many times per day the keywordsThe match of these two different teams can provide a complete solution to are updated. If you are an advertisermeet all of an advertiser’s needs. (Note: Many agencies also develop and being charged by keyword, theprovide proprietary software solutions in addition to their agency services.) ‘long tail’ keywords are generally unprofitable. While the long tail may not normally be the majority of yourStep Three: Begin the Selection Process: sales, in this pricing model, therePhone Calls, RFIs and RFPs is less experimentation that can be profitably implemented.Once you’ve decided to hire a digital agency, the next step is to develop alist of potential agency partners to contact – whether by phone, request for 2. Charge Per Click. In the earlyinformation (RFI), or request for proposal (RFP). days of PPC, click costs could vary dramatically. Advertisers would seeMany digital agency executives report that the majority of their new their clicks remain constant andbusiness comes from referrals rather than RFPs. Therefore, before – or yet their bills continued to rise.instead of – initiating a more formal RFP process, it may be wise to begin The charge-per-click billing modelby contacting some of your marketing peers to find out which agencies evolved from advertisers lookingthey are using and why they chose the partners they did. Then call any to ensure that their agencies wererecommended agencies to discuss your business needs and whether or not doing enough keyword research tothey might be an appropriate fit. This step serves three purposes: ensure that higher click volume didn’t lower conversion. The key to this 1) It allows any agency that doesn’t want to respond to your RFP to opt billing method is ensuring that all out of the process right away; clicks, if not equal, are relevant. 2) It enables you to speak directly to an appropriate individual at the agency and establish a rapport; and 3) It assures that you will be sending your RFP to the right person at the agency.Some clients begin the selection process using a broad-based RFI to cast a wide net to between ten and 15 agenciesbefore homing in on a more targeted group of potential partners through an RFP. The RFI should query agencies abouttheir size, management team, organizational and operating structures, target customer, and digital capabilities. Include keybusiness terms upfront, for example, competitive conflicts or non-compete requirements, travel policies, and minority hiringand green commitments. The result should be a streamlined two-page document with a deadline of two to three weeks foragency responses.An RFP follows through on the process to gather and assess targeted information from the agencies that seem mostinterested in your business and would be the best fit for your advertising needs and culture. It should include tangiblefactors such as the agency’s ability to provide scalability, proven results, and an acceptable fee model; as well as intangiblessuch as common goals, cultural fit, and chemistry. Industry experts recommend sending out no fewer than three and nomore than six to eight RFPs with a two-to-three week deadline for responses.© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 12 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideDeveloping an effective RFP can be complicated and should include all relevant stakeholders within your business. Manyenterprises must solicit bids through the RFP process due to accounting or procurement requirements. All staff from eachrelevant department should meet to develop the RFP and sign off on it before it is sent out. It will be frustrating for boththe agencies involved and your staff to have to redo the RFP because a key individual on your end wasn’t consulted, or youdidn’t ask the right questions, or clearly identify your objectives.Some enterprise-level advertisers engage the services of a marketing management firm that can objectively guide themthrough the RFI and RFP process. These types of firms can help break down corporate silos, bring together the appropriatestakeholders within the business, and identify its digital advertising needs and strategic goals.The most effective RFPs only request relevant information from the agency, and provide ample information about yourbusiness and its digital advertising needs. It should reflect high-level strategic goals and key performance indicators (KPIs),rather than drill-down data geared toward IT or procurement. For example, mention your company’s most important KPIsand how you will evaluate the success of your digital campaigns. When written properly, an RFP will facilitate the salesprocess and ensure that everyone involved on both sides comes to a shared understanding of the purpose, requirements,scope, and structure of the intended engagement.Table 11 illustrates some of the information that is important to provide in an effective RFP to attract the types of responsesthat will enable you to make the right choice. Table 11: Business Information to Provide in an Agency RFP Industry • Industry structure and stage (early vs. mature; fragmented vs. Overview consolidated) • Market size ($) • Customer/Buyer characteristics Company • Company size (number of employees and/or revenue) Background • Years in business, industry position • Product/service information including unique value propositions (USPs) • Sales/distribution channels and technology platforms Objectives • Scope of work: digital channels for which you are seeking work and Goals • Goals/KPIs: Higher conversion? More leads? Brand awareness? • Say whether you are looking for a short- or long-term relationship • If project oriented, detailed specs to enable more accurate bids Decision Makers • State who will be involved in the agency evaluation and Processes • Clarify the decision-making process • Mention the most important criteria. i.e., price, location • Say who will manage the relationship once a contract is signed Deadlines • Clear due date for a response (Two to three weeks is sufficient) and Legal • NDA • Legal terms/ownership of deliverables Source: Third Door Media© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 13 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideConversely, there are many questions that you’ll need to ask an agency inan RFP. The key is to ask the right questions, and respect the agency’s timeand resources by avoiding questions that can be answered by a quick look Sample RFP Outlineat its website. If procurement has driven the RFP process or been integrally I. Summary and Overviewinvolved, make sure that the questions are relevant and appropriate for the a. An “Executive Summary” ofadvertising industry. Focus on questions that are specific to your business the RFP highlights without thesituation and digital initiatives, with the goal of gathering the data you’ll technical details. Introduceneed to make the most informed decision possible. Table 12 lists some of the challenge your company isthe relevant agency questions that are most appropriate in an RFP. Agencies having and provide the agencythat are truly interested in winning your business will take the time to answer with an overview of the rest ofthese questions. the RFP. II. Technical SummaryStep Four: Choosing the Right Agency a. Provide key pieces of information relevant to your project,When you have received your RFP responses, arrange for face-to-face i.e., technical requirements,presentations from each of the “finalists.” During these meetings, consider description of the project’squantitative factors including pricing, channel expertise, and analytics/ technical issues, your site’sreporting capabilities; as well as qualitative – or intuitive – considerations such current platform, etc. Thisas the agency’s culture, and the chemistry between your staff and the agency’s section may originate from yourteam. Decide which of these factors are most important to your business goals. IT department and targets the agency’s programmers and delivery team. Table 12: Questions to ask an Agency in an RFP III. Administration and Management a. Describe who will be involved Agency • Agency history and expertise (years in business) in the project from your end Background • Agency size (number of employees and billings) and what the timeline is for • Specific vertical industry experience/expertise completion. Finalize the • Target customer (by $ and vertical market) framework of the work. IV. Project Expectations and Agency • Biographies of key executives Delivery • Potential members of your account team and their a. Outline your evaluation criteria, Staffing experience monthly deliverables, and • Internal resources vs. agency use of subcontractors or training you expect to receive to outsourcing assess your goals and KPIs. This • Employee churn rates and average tenure will help the agency determine their cost to complete your work, Client • Average tenure and retention rate of agency clients as well as their suitability. References • Relevant client contact information V. Deadlines and Budgets • Case studies with results a. Provide projected deadlines and Work • Examples of the agency’s work in vertical markets or and budgets to avoid confusion digital channels over when a project should be completed and how much it Pricing and • Agency billing policies and terms might cost. Contract Terms • Pricing structure for the account (i.e., retainer, b. Assess your budget based on the commission, time, spend, or performance based) “range” of services you’ll need. • Add-on fees For example, instead of saying the project absolutely has to cost Customer • SLA terms and costs for technology platforms “X” amount, you are willing to Support • Training and onboarding services included in fees spend within a range from “$X • Availability of key personnel (24/7 vs. business hours) to $Y”. • Frequency of team phone calls, on-site visits, and reports Source: Stephan Spencer, Search Engine Land Source: Third Door Media© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 14 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideThe following section discusses some of these considerations in moredepth. Create a Decision MatrixBrand/Reputation Are you ready to start the decision-making process? It may help to create a decisionAgency brands are important and provide a sense of the agency’s matrix, which is simply a chart listing thehistory and values. How long has the agency been in business? Is attributes you are looking for in a digitalit profitable? Does it have a business plan? Funding? What kind of agency, a weighting factor for each attribute,employee turnover does it have? How about client retention? These a score from 0 to 10 for each, and theare questions you must have answers to through the RFP process. weighted score (e.g., the score multiplied byThey will also provide clues to the agency’s future and its vision. the weighting factor). Remember to include both quantitative and qualitative judgingAgency Expertise criteria. You will add the weighted scores together to arrive at a total score that canStep one of the digital agency selection process was to do a thorough self- help to differentiate some seemingly similarevaluation of your business’s needs. Now it is time to decide: Is the right competitors (see Table 13).agency a channel specialist or a full-service shop that can service all of yourdigital advertising needs?If you choose a specialist because the bulk of your digital work is in SEO and email marketing, for example, can theagency service any future social marketing or PPC campaigns that you begin? Similarly, as your business grows, can aboutique or specialist handle larger, more complex campaigns? On the other hand, a full-service agency may offer abroad swath of channel services, but not have the depth of experience in SEO or PPC that your business requires. Manytimes such agencies will be very strong in one area, and only moderately knowledgeable in others.Do the finalists know your industry? Is that important to you? Some industry experts argue that channel expertise is morevaluable than vertical market experience. In other words, it is easier to get up to speed on retail, travel, or healthcare digitalsuccess strategies than it is to learn how to run an effective Twitter campaign. However, many advertisers believe that strongvertical knowledge is an advantage for their campaign work. If that is the case, find out if the agency follows your verticalindustry’s best practices to decide which strategic and tactical activities to undertake. Table 13: Sample Agency Decision Matrix Attribute Agency X Agency X Agency Y Agency Y Agency Z Agency Z (Weighting Score Weighted Score Score Weighted Score Score Weighted Score factor) Creative (2) 5 10 6 12 8 16 Deliverables (2) 8 16 6 12 7 14 Agency expertise (4) 8 32 7 28 7 28 Staff/Talent (3) 7 21 8 24 9 27 Client references (4) 7 28 7 28 7 28 Client support (3) 6 18 8 24 8 24 Fee structure (1) 8 8 7 7 5 5 Total Weighted Score 133 135 142 Source: Third Door Media© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 15 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideCulture One of the best waysThe core values of an agency will foretell the kind of relationship you are likely to to get a true sense ofhave. Choose an agency that is collaborative, innovative, and proactive. Avoidagencies that tolerate fiefdoms. If possible, do a tour of its office, which often an agency’s capabilitieswill tell you a lot about its culture, efficiency, and stability. The mark of a good is to speak to its clientsagency is often in the cheerfulness and energy in its corridors. and see case studiesStaff/Talent and samples of itsOne of the most important criteria in selecting an agency is the agency’s work. Ask for and calltalent – particularly of the staff that will manage your account. These people’sskills, dedication, and passion for your business will determine the success agency references andof your digital campaigns. Make sure you understand who’s going to be onyour team, what their roles are, and how much time they will devote to your ask specifically aboutaccount. Agency turnover is a legitimate concern for clients. Ask to see the their satisfaction withagency’s turnover rate. Find out how the agency hires, promotes, and rewards itstalent. How does the agency keep current with the rapidly changing landscape the agency relationship.of digital marketing? Does staff go to seminars and conventions? Does themanagement encourage ongoing educational efforts? Find out what formaltraining agency personnel has received, and who specifically has been credentialed and trained.Does the agency do all the work in-house, or does it rely on subcontractors for key functions? The more of your work thatgets farmed out, the less it is under the agency’s control – and your control. Subcontracting arrangements can lead toserious execution problems including miscommunication, missed deadlines, and cost overruns.Client ReferencesOne of the best ways to get a true sense of an agency’s capabilities is to speak to its clients and see case studies andsamples of its work. Ask for and call agency references and ask specifically about their satisfaction with the agencyrelationship. Does the agency consistently meet timelines? Does it adhere to its quoted prices? Is the account staff easy towork with? What results have been achieved?Ask the agency to prepare sample work for you based on your website by the people who would be assigned the everydaytasks on your account. This isn’t to get free advice, but rather to see the quality of the work that will be done on youraccount.Client SupportMost agencies work on a model of overlapping time, meaning you do not have a dedicated resource assigned to youraccount, despite what you might otherwise be told by an account representative. Your goal should be to understandhow many hours will be applied each week to your account’s work by actual subject matter experts (SMEs) in PPC, socialmedia, or SEO. Make sure the agency is willing to assign a relationship manager to your business to serve as a conduit forcommunication.Fee StructureYou need to be comfortable with an agency’s fee structure. If not, you’ll second guess whether or not you’re beingovercharged or underserviced. While pricing is important, it shouldn’t be the most important factor in making your decision.Agencies are businesses hired to help your company achieve its goals on time and on budget. Make sure you understandand agree on a fee structure that will leave both client and agency feeling served and fairly compensated.© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 16 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideDeliverablesMake sure that you and the agency you select define RFPs: 20 Questionsobjectives and evaluation criteria before signing acontract. You don’t want to be left wondering, month after to Askmonth, whether the agency is producing results. Your There are many ways to write an RFP. Here is one inagency should be able to show you analytics on a regular question format.basis and make suggestions and adjustments on the fly.How can you know what’s working and not working if you 1. Provide an overview of your company includingaren’t analyzing reports on a consistent basis? Focus not history, key leaders and locations.only on statistics, but also on consumer sentiment. For 2. What is your core offering? What distinguishes yourexample, what are fans of your brand saying and doing offering from your main competitors?in relation to the social media campaign? This type of 3. How many employees does your companyfeedback will allow you to address concerns, initiate have? How many employees focus on accountcourse corrections, and better estimate your next moves. management, development and innovation? 4. Have you made any significant acquisitions within the last two years? If so, describe your firm’s strategicStep Five: Negotiate Contract Terms integration roadmap for your solution suite. 5. What awards has your company received in the pastContract length can often be a sticking point in 18 months?negotiations. Before signing any contract, you should 6. How many clients do you have? What percentage ofclearly understand the pricing, contract length, and your client base is international?renewal status. Many advertisers want the flexibility of a 7. Who are your top 5 clients and what year did youmonth-to-month contract. However, agencies usually want begin the relationship?longer contracts to ensure revenue flow. One factor to 8. How have you grown your long term clientconsider is that many digital campaigns, particularly PPC engagements? Provide examples.and SEO programs, take several months to build results. 9. How does your agency stay abreast of industry trendsIf an agency is offering bundled services with additional and educate your clients?built-in costs (i.e., website design, domain name 10. How do you strategically approach the convergenceprocurement, call-tracking numbers, etc.) then an annual of paid, owned and earned media?contract may be necessary. Sometimes annual contracts 11. Who leads the strategy development process in yourcan include a three-month opt-out provision. organization? 12. What steps are taken by your agency to deliver onDecide if you want an “evergreen” contract, also known ROI goals for performance marketing campaigns?as an auto-renewal contract. In this scenario, the initial 13. How does your agency proactively mine competitivecontract is automatically renewed if neither party takes data, intelligence for clients?action. The benefit of an auto-renewal contract is that 14. What strategies do you find strongest for driving &neither side has to do additional paperwork after the measuring offline conversions via online advertising?contract is signed. The downside is that it doesn’t force 15. Describe any recent experience your agency has hadeither side to periodically evaluate an account’s progress in working seamlessly with other agencies in a client’sor performance. Signing a month-to-month contract also agency network.has advantages and disadvantages. The disadvantage 16. What types of analytical tools do you use with clients?is that there is additional paperwork each month for 17. Describe your standard testing process andboth the client and agency. The upside is that it enables technology that assists in testing setup, execution,advertisers to more frequently evaluate their agency post-launch optimization, and analysisrelationship and campaign results. 18. What types of reporting and business intelligence insights do you provide clients? 19. Describe your global experience including case studies relevant to our business. How is your approach different than management of US-only campaigns? 20. Describe your team’s language and localization capabilities. Source: Performics© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 17 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideConclusionThe process of choosing a digital advertising agency can be daunting and complex. From full-service agencies ownedby holding companies with global networks, to regional agencies serving the needs of a few large, local advertisers, toboutique channel specialists that delve deeply into digital strategies such as SEO link building or Facebook conversions,there is no “one size fits all” approach to hiring a digital agency partner.Yet making the right selection can also begin a long and prosperous relationship for both advertiser and agency, in whichthe client’s digital advertising programs more efficiently scale and mature. Digital advertising is playing a more integral rolein overall advertising budgets and strategies. Harnessing its power can positively transform a business’s brand and sales.Each advertiser’s situation and needs are unique. The key to making a successful decision begins internally with acomprehensive self-assessment of your organization’s internal strengths, challenges, and needs from a business, staffing,and technology perspective. From there, you will begin to look outward and evaluate the type of agency or agencies thatwill provide the best fit, and then question and meet the agencies that fall into that category. Pricing is important, butshouldn’t be the most important factor in making your decision. Ultimately, an agency’s core values, talent, and dedicationto your business will determine the success of your relationship and your digital campaigns. n© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 18 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s GuideResourcesANA/4A’s Guidelines for Agency Search. Association of National Advertisers and the American Association of AdvertisingAgencies. http://www.aaaa.org/news/bulletins/Documents/agency_search_white_paper.pdfFive Ways to Get More Out of Your Digital Agency. Author David Murdico, Managing Partner, Supercool Creative.http://adage.com/article/digitalnext/ways-digital-agency/232856/How to Choose a Marketing Agency. Author Tom Pick, Webbiquity blog.http://webbiquity.com/outsourced-marketing-services/how-to-choose-a-marketing-agency-ad-agency/How to Select an Interactive Marketing Agency. Author Bradd Shorr, Director of Content & Social Media, Straight North.http://www.techipedia.com/2012/interactive-marketing-agency-selection/How to Write an Ad Agency RFP. Author Tom Pick, Webbiquity blog.http://webbiquity.com/outsourced-marketing-services/how-to-write-an-ad-agency-rfp/How to Write a Killer RFP for Hiring an SEO Firm. Author Stephan Spencer, Founder, NetConcepts.http://searchengineland.com/how-to-write-a-killer-rfp-request-for-proposal-for-hiring-an-seo-firm-13417PPC Management Options – Are Your Fees Inline With The Advertiser’s Goals? Author Brad Geddes, Founder, CertifiedKnowledge. http://searchengineland.com/ppc-management-options-are-your-fees-inline-with-the-advertisers-goals-14077RFP Basics for Procuring Disruptive Technology and Services. Author Dustin Engel, Elegant Disruption blog.http://www.elegantdisruption.com/blog/2011/11/7/rfp-basics-for-procuring-disruptive-technology-and-services.htmlVetting an Agency: Protecting the Family Jewels. Author Duane Forrester, In-house SEM, Microsoft.ttp://searchengineland.com/vetting-an-agency-protecting-the-family-jewels-12219What to Expect From an SEO/SEM Agency. Author Duane Forrester, In-house SEM, Microsoft.http://searchengineland.com/what-to-expect-from-an-seosem-agency-40361What Matters Most When Selecting an Agency. Author Avi Dan, President, Avidan Strategies.http://adage.com/article/cmo-strategy/marketing-matters-selecting-agency/145554/Agency ResourcesBelow is contact information for agencies that have advertised in this report.aimClear DNA - Digital Net Agency RKGwww.aimclear.com http://digitalnetagency.com http://www.rimmkaufman.com(218) 727-4325 (866) DNA-1275 (434) 220-5210Covario Page One Powerhttp://covario.com http://pageonepower.com(858) 397-1500 (208) 229-7046The DAC Group Performicshttp://dacgroup.com http://performics.com(866) 329-1884 (800) 615-6126© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 19 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com
  • Digital Advertising Agencies 2013: A Buyer’s Guide Stop paying agencies for the wrong behaviors. Start paying us for the right results. The leading performance-based digital agency n Search Engine Optimization n Search Engine Marketing n Social Media Marketing n Affiliate Management dna_11_2012.indd 4 11/15/12 10:52 PM BIG PROBLEMS SOLVED: How Do You Get LOCAL 35,000 Locations to DOMINATION Show Up in Local Search? Our client challenged us to manage visibility for 35,000 of their neighborhood locations. We created a solution that not only overcame SEO and data integrity issues, but ultimately dominated maps, local search and mobile local. In most US markets now, you can search for their category on any device and find a nearby location. We solve problems others cannot — at scale! performics.com @performics +1 312 739 0222 Global Performance Marketing Agency marketing@performics.com© 2013 Third Door Media, Inc. • http://digitalmarketingdepot.com 20 Email: whitepapers@digitalmarketingdepot.com