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See through Biometrics

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This is a student presentation given in the MBS MSc course Innovation and Knowledge Economy taught by Prof. Andrew for group assignment in 2009.

This is a student presentation given in the MBS MSc course Innovation and Knowledge Economy taught by Prof. Andrew for group assignment in 2009.


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  • 1. 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011SEE THROUGHBIOMETRICS Prepared by Group 5 Winnie Cheung, Zeyu Zhao, Stefan Mihai Preoteasa, Hsuan-Yi Wu2009 INNOVATION ANDCheng-Yu HuangNOV. 26, 2009 (Jen), and KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 1
  • 2. OUTLINE  INTRODUCTION OF BIOMETRICS BIOMETRICS / TECHNOLOGY SYSTEM / TYPES  SOCIAL SHAPING OF BIOMETRICS SCOT / ISSUES / PERFORMANCE  ETHICS & SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION ARGUMENTS / DISCUSSIONS / ACTOR NETWORK  DIFFUSION, ADOPTION AND CONSUMPTION  CONCLUSION & THE FUTURENOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 2
  • 3. WHAT IS BIOMETRICS? “the automatic personal recognition based on physiological or behavioural characteristics” Jain, A, et al. (1999)  Properties  Universal  Collectable  Distinctive  PermanenceNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 3
  • 4. TECHNOLOGY SYSTEM Enrolment Template Stored on Scan/Capture Database Created Database Identification VerificationNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 4
  • 5. TYPES Physiological Behavioural  Fingerprint  Iris  Gait  Face  Retina  Speech  Vascular Patterns  DNA  SignatureNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 5
  • 6. SCOT  Interpretative flexibility – Variation – Selection  Closure mechanisms  Relevant Social groups – Society – Economy – Organization – IndividualNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 6
  • 7. ISSUES  Liveness testing- Real person or some kind of simulation?  Large-scale system- Which bio-tech to use and by what level?  Biometric standards- International, national or regional? Hardware and software  Testing and evaluationNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 7
  • 8. PERFORMANCE  Efficiency- How much time biometric needs and how much time it can save?  Security- compare to traditional technologies?  Accuracy- what kind of fault might happen and faulty rate?  Interoperability and cost  Data maintenance- usage, storage, update, transmissionNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 8
  • 9. ARGUMENTS Arguments and counter-arguments for biometrics:  Technical limits  Balkanization  Cooperation  Security  The debate over privacy: psychological comfort zone, self-esteem, the objectification of the body, loss of anonymityNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 9
  • 10. ETHICS & SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION • Function creep and interoperability: – stored biometric data could be used for purposes that were not originally foreseen, especially with the advances in system interoperability – The temptation to function creep will grow along with the number of companies and organizations that will have access to biometric information – Strict separation of government and commercial databases needed • Potential for extreme and covert surveillance through more advanced technologies. Can lead to a feeling of discrimination and lack of trust for the government among the citizenry. • Limiting individual rights vs. the Common Good: is sliding too far either way dangerous? • The technology and it surrounding institutions need to be transparent and trusted in order for biometrics to be adopted and ethical. • Conclusion: from the point of view of ethics, the social construction of biometrics can be best described by the ANT modelNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 10
  • 11. ACTOR NETWORK IN BIOMETRICS Ethical Governments Concerns Citizenry Biometrics Technology Commercial Companies Industry Standards Criminals/ TerroristsNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 11
  • 12. DIFFUSION & ADOPTION From government to citizens, from organization to consumers  Government Sector  Financial Sector  Healthcare and Biotechnology Sector  Travel & Immigration Sector  Private Sector / Consumer MarketsNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 12
  • 13. REVENUES OF BIOMETRICSNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 13
  • 14. USES OF BIOMETRICSNOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 14
  • 15. CONCLUSION  Biometrics as a technology……… (evolution point of view)  What biometrics needs is greater transparency and trust from the users among the population.  There is a large potential for biometrics in consumer market.  Future application and scenario will be human-centric focusing on not only security but also convenience, health, satisfaction and interaction.NOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 15
  • 16. FUTURE SCENARIO Biometrics will not only about itself. It is about the combined and integrated application in all sectors, especially with IT. - RFID - Flexible Electronics - Simulation - Interactive Design - …………………NOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 16
  • 17. FUTURE SCENARIONOV. 26, 2009 2009 INNOVATION AND KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 17
  • 18. Thanks for your attention. Questions are welcome! SEE THROUGH BIOMETRICS Prepared by Group 5 Winnie Cheung, Zeyu Zhao, Stefan Mihai Preoteasa, Hsuan-Yi Wu 2009 INNOVATION ANDCheng-Yu HuangNOV. 26, 2009 (Jen), and KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY BMAN 61011 18

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